Matthew and the Great Zombie Walk
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10-09-2017, 12:50 AM
Matthew and the Great Zombie Walk
Sounds like the title of a great movie. Laugh out load

Anyway, I'd like to post this link to this great little website I just came across. It's kinda funny.

Here's the topic of the web page:

"Why is Matthew the only to mention that people rose from the dead after Christ's resurrection?"

So the person goes into logical details that seem to pass over deluded believers.

"Imagine you witnessed a car accident near a graveyard. After the accident, some graves opened up and several people rose from the dead. Do you think this might be something you’d mention when retelling the story? Sure, because it’s an extremely unusual event. People don’t just rise up out of the grave every day (well, not nearly as often as they used to).

But what if several other people witnessed the same accident, but didn’t mention any dead people rising from the grave? Perhaps they all just had a minor lapse in memory. Or perhaps they all didn’t feel it was relevant to the story. Or perhaps they all would later recall “Oh yes, I forgot the bit about the zombies. Now that you mention it, I definitely saw some zombies.”


But what had me rolling on the floor laughing was this little gem.

"So did the other gospel writers just think Matthew was full of crap? Maybe they thought the story would steal Jesus’s thunder. After all, if everyone else is rising from the dead, maybe it’s not such a big deal. (“You say Jesus rose from the dead and appeared to many? So did my uncle Joe!”) "

Laugh out load Laugh out load Laugh out load

OMG that's funny.

Anyway, here's the link.

https://500questions.wordpress.com/2011/...urrection/

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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10-09-2017, 03:57 AM
RE: Matthew and the Great Zombie Walk
I like this....... Matthew doesn't go into much detail Big Grin

Get your own bleeding hymn book
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10-09-2017, 06:49 AM
RE: Matthew and the Great Zombie Walk
(10-09-2017 12:50 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  Sounds like the title of a great movie. Laugh out load

Anyway, I'd like to post this link to this great little website I just came across. It's kinda funny.

Here's the topic of the web page:

"Why is Matthew the only to mention that people rose from the dead after Christ's resurrection?"

So the person goes into logical details that seem to pass over deluded believers.

"Imagine you witnessed a car accident near a graveyard. After the accident, some graves opened up and several people rose from the dead. Do you think this might be something you’d mention when retelling the story? Sure, because it’s an extremely unusual event. People don’t just rise up out of the grave every day (well, not nearly as often as they used to).

But what if several other people witnessed the same accident, but didn’t mention any dead people rising from the grave? Perhaps they all just had a minor lapse in memory. Or perhaps they all didn’t feel it was relevant to the story. Or perhaps they all would later recall “Oh yes, I forgot the bit about the zombies. Now that you mention it, I definitely saw some zombies.”


But what had me rolling on the floor laughing was this little gem.

"So did the other gospel writers just think Matthew was full of crap? Maybe they thought the story would steal Jesus’s thunder. After all, if everyone else is rising from the dead, maybe it’s not such a big deal. (“You say Jesus rose from the dead and appeared to many? So did my uncle Joe!”) "

Laugh out load Laugh out load Laugh out load

OMG that's funny.

Anyway, here's the link.

https://500questions.wordpress.com/2011/...urrection/

The gospel of Nicodemus was about a couple of the zombies alleged testimony. Charinus and Lenthius relate their story of how they saw Jesus in hell where Satan and the "prince of hell" discussed what to do with Jesus. The "prince of hell" was simply the Greek god of the underworld Hades in the original Greek translation.

You can understand why they weren't too thrilled with considering this book as part of biblical canon. Laugh out load

I've seen Christian apologists simply dismiss this book as fiction that was so abundant at that time without being the least bit introspective about those other books of fiction. (The canonical gospels) Facepalm

Gods derive their power from post-hoc rationalizations. -The Inquisition

Using the supernatural to explain events in your life is a failure of the intellect to comprehend the world around you. -The Inquisition
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10-09-2017, 10:08 AM
Matthew and the Great Zombie Walk
Resurrections are not such a big deal in the Bible. There are at least nine resurrections in the Bible in addition to Jesus’: a young boy (1 Kings 17:17-24); another young boy (2 Kings 4:32-37); a grown man (2 Kings 13: 20-21); a young girl (Mark 5:42); Lazarus (John 11); a young man (Luke 7:14); A number of people at the moment of the death of Christ (Matthew 27:51-53); a man after he fell out of a third-floor window (Acts 20:9-12); and another young girl (Acts 9:36-43).

Furthermore, many pagan gods were resurrected before the time of Christ, about whom Justin Martyr said:

"And when we say also that the Word, who is the first-birth of God, was produced without sexual union, and that He, Jesus Christ, our Teacher, was crucified and died, and rose again, and ascended into heaven, we propound nothing different from what you believe regarding those whom you esteem sons of Jupiter." Apology 21

Some of the gods to which Justin may have referred are as follows:
Achilles, after his death, was taken from his funeral pyre by his mother Thetis and resurrected. Memnon, who was killed by Achilles, was similarly resurrected to become immortal. Asclepius, a minor Greek god, raised Hippolytus from the dead, and later was resurrected himself and transformed into a major deity. Other Greek figures said to have undergone resurrection include Heracles and Melicertes. Furthermore, according to Herodotus, the sage Aristeas of Proconnesus (7th century BC) died and his body later disappeared from a locked room. Later he was discovered to have resurrected, and was seen living, but later disappeared again (notice any parallels with Christ?). Similarly, in Plutarch's chapter on Romulus he gives an account of this man's mysterious disappearance and subsequent deification, comparing it to the resurrection of Aristeas.

Attis is another famous dying and resurrecting god. His death and resurrection were celebrated on the same day of the year that Christians later celebrated Easter. The rite involved tying an effigy of Attis to a tree trunk and burying it in a tomb. Three days later, at dawn, his resurrection from the dead was celebrated. The worship of Attis was imported to Rome around 200 BC, but existed long before that time as a prominent cult in Phyrgia. Roman writers who mentioned the cult of Attis include: Lucretius (lived 98 - 54 BC), Catullus (86 -40 BC), Varro (116 - 28 BC), and Dionysus Halicarnasensis (first century BC). The Festival of Joy, celebrating Attis' death and rebirth, was celebrated yearly in Rome from the reign of Claudius (AD 41 - 54).

Osiris likewise, according to Plutarch, descended to hell and then resurrected on the third day (op. cit. 39 and 42). Plutarch also states that Osiris, like Jesus, was wrapped in linen and anointed with myrrh before burial (Plutarch, Issis and Osiris, 16). Even Pythagoras was said to have descended into hell after his death, reappeared to his disciples and then ascended to heaven (MacMullen, 1966).

In the Jewish War (Book 7 Ch.2:1) Josephus relates the feigned resurrection of one Simon b. Giora (aka Simon the Tyrant): he went down into an underground cavern that wasn't visible from above ground, put on graveclothes, and then put in his appearance.

Buddhism is also the source of a famous resurrection - that of Bodhidharma, an Indian Buddhist master, the founder of Chan Buddhism. Three years after Bodhidharma's death he was seen by Ambassador Songyun of northern Wei, walking and carrying a shoe in the Himalayas.

In addition, Apollonius of Tyana (a contemporary of Christ) resurrected from the dead. Philostratus Book 8:31

Sai Baba (a living Hindu guru) resurrected two people. http://www.saibaba.ws/miracles/resurrect...rishna.htm

Paramahansa Yogananda recounts the resurrection of his own spiritual master in Autobiography of a Yogi. http://www.crystalclarity.com/yogananda/chap43.html

This comprises a total of at least 26 resurrections, not including the feigned resurrection related by Josephus. This figure would be larger, depending on how many saints crawled out of their graves and strolled through Jerusalem at Christ's death (an event only Matthew noticed, and he failed to tell us how many saints were involved. We only know there was more than one).

In other words, it would appear that resurrection is a fairly common trick among wannabe gods and holy men.
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10-09-2017, 11:00 AM
RE: Matthew and the Great Zombie Walk
That reminds me, the Fear the Walking Dead fall tv premiere is on tonight. Smile

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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