Meeting with my psychiatrist
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03-11-2015, 02:19 PM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
I can empathise with you MrKrispy, having been in the military many years ago (Australian army) and having had negative experiences with army medical personnel back in the day. I'm sorry that the military apparently still haven't updated their clinical protocols as far as troops suffering from unavoidable mental disorders goes. That your psychiatrist has a confrontational approach—if you see it that way—means she's not assessing your state of mind at all accurately, regardless of what she thinks she's doing.

Her prime course of action should be—in my non-qualified opinion—to ascertain what specific, ongoing problems have beset you; their catalyst, your responses (correct or inappropriate), and a solution—"talk" therapy, medication, CBT, or a combination of them all.

Personally, I don't believe that one needs to present with a self-determined "game plan" or even an idea of what triggers(ed) your PTSD. The psychiatrist needs to work all this out by questioning you in a manner that's definitely non-confrontational, and build up a picture of the causes and effect of your distress. There's really no point in her expecting you to know what the various issues are in advance. If you did, well then you'd have already achieved at least some peace of mind.

I'm suffering from clinical depression and an anxiety disorder, and I've been taking medication for around 15 years, with no untoward physical or mental side-effects. I know that some folks are very "anti-drugs"—which is perfectly okay—but without my medication I'd gradually slip into a very depressive state of mind.

Re the 1st/sgt's joke about your beard; totally, absolutely inappropriate. It's amazing just how ignorant of mental health issues are many of the population—including the military apparently. I'm not sure of your situation, but is it possible to see a civvy psychiatrist on your own time, and choose one that you feel comfortable opening up to? I'm just a bit concerned that a military psychiatrist is—literally—acting under orders from above to minimise any mental health issues amongst the troops. All the medicos I came across in the army were there because they apparently couldn't make it in civvy street.

I know it's only words in cyberspace, but I'll wish you all the best for a more positive outcome in the very near future, and please know that there's people here thinking of you.

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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03-11-2015, 02:27 PM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
(03-11-2015 02:19 PM)SYZ Wrote:  I can empathise with you MrKrispy, having been in the military many years ago (Australian army) and having had negative experiences with army medical personnel back in the day. I'm sorry that the military apparently still haven't updated their clinical protocols as far as troops suffering from unavoidable mental disorders goes. That your psychiatrist has a confrontational approach—if you see it that way—means she's not assessing your state of mind at all accurately, regardless of what she thinks she's doing.

Her prime course of action should be—in my non-qualified opinion—to ascertain what specific, ongoing problems have beset you; their catalyst, your responses (correct or inappropriate), and a solution—"talk" therapy, medication, CBT, or a combination of them all.

Personally, I don't believe that one needs to present with a self-determined "game plan" or even an idea of what triggers(ed) your PTSD. The psychiatrist needs to work all this out by questioning you in a manner that's definitely non-confrontational, and build up a picture of the causes and effect of your distress. There's really no point in her expecting you to know what the various issues are in advance. If you did, well then you'd have already achieved at least some peace of mind.

I'm suffering from clinical depression and an anxiety disorder, and I've been taking medication for around 15 years, with no untoward physical or mental side-effects. I know that some folks are very "anti-drugs"—which is perfectly okay—but without my medication I'd gradually slip into a very depressive state of mind.

Re the 1st/sgt's joke about your beard; totally, absolutely inappropriate. It's amazing just how ignorant of mental health issues are many of the population—including the military apparently. I'm not sure of your situation, but is it possible to see a civvy psychiatrist on your own time, and choose one that you feel comfortable opening up to? I'm just a bit concerned that a military psychiatrist is—literally—acting under orders from above to minimise any mental health issues amongst the troops. All the medicos I came across in the army were there because they apparently couldn't make it in civvy street.

I know it's only words in cyberspace, but I'll wish you all the best for a more positive outcome in the very near future, and please know that there's people here thinking of you.

Thanks for your support. It's good to see that I'm not the only one who has been brought through the ringer. Just wish it wasn't even an issue though. It's like they actively try to ignore something that is a huge issue. We've been in a war for 14 years....i'm only 23. So more than half of my life. Plus we just put boots on the ground in syria in big numbers. We haven't even had time for us to pick up the pieces....it just keeps creating more and more problems.
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03-11-2015, 02:52 PM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
Aren't psychiatrists for the drugs and psychologists for the talking stuff?

I don't really like going outside.
It's too damn "peopley" out there....
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03-11-2015, 03:33 PM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
(03-11-2015 12:46 PM)MrKrispy601 Wrote:  
(03-11-2015 12:43 PM)ohio_drg Wrote:  Was this a military or a civilian doctor?

It was a military doctor.

Not fucking surprised. Have you looked into what the proper protocols are for going outside to a civilian doctor?
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03-11-2015, 05:33 PM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
(03-11-2015 12:59 PM)MrKrispy601 Wrote:  For those who aren't familiar with the military or haven't been in for the last 10+ years when that happens you're suppose to at least go see a damn Chaplin or something or at least talk to them then and get a feel.

I would go to a Chaplain myself KrispyKritter. If you let them know you are suicidal and feel helpless and abandoned pretty sure they will make shit start to happen. Much quicker than the IG could.

#sigh
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07-11-2015, 11:41 PM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
It sounds like the psychiatrist and you are not a good match. If he is convinced you need medication, and you won't take it, he needs to be able to tell you in a professional way that you need to find another doctor who will be a better match.

That said, why the adamant refusal of medications? They have a place, just as medications do in other conditions. Would you tell a neurologist you refuse to take medication for seizures? Or a cardiologist you refuse to take medication for heart failure? There is such a stigma to psychiatric medications, even among psychiatric patients, and I don't get it. I'm not saying your condition requires medication. Maybe it doesn't, and your doctor is an asshole. But if it is a crucial part of your treatment and you refuse, your doctor is likely frustrated.
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08-11-2015, 08:14 AM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
(07-11-2015 11:41 PM)beeglez Wrote:  It sounds like the psychiatrist and you are not a good match. If he is convinced you need medication, and you won't take it, he needs to be able to tell you in a professional way that you need to find another doctor who will be a better match.

That said, why the adamant refusal of medications? They have a place, just as medications do in other conditions. Would you tell a neurologist you refuse to take medication for seizures? Or a cardiologist you refuse to take medication for heart failure? There is such a stigma to psychiatric medications, even among psychiatric patients, and I don't get it. I'm not saying your condition requires medication. Maybe it doesn't, and your doctor is an asshole. But if it is a crucial part of your treatment and you refuse, your doctor is likely frustrated.

I'm sorry if I didn't specify that correctly but I did try the meds before and I was open to them this time. The reason I stopped was due to it causing me more problems instead of helping.
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08-11-2015, 09:41 AM
RE: Meeting with my psychiatrist
(08-11-2015 08:14 AM)MrKrispy601 Wrote:  
(07-11-2015 11:41 PM)beeglez Wrote:  It sounds like the psychiatrist and you are not a good match. If he is convinced you need medication, and you won't take it, he needs to be able to tell you in a professional way that you need to find another doctor who will be a better match.

That said, why the adamant refusal of medications? They have a place, just as medications do in other conditions. Would you tell a neurologist you refuse to take medication for seizures? Or a cardiologist you refuse to take medication for heart failure? There is such a stigma to psychiatric medications, even among psychiatric patients, and I don't get it. I'm not saying your condition requires medication. Maybe it doesn't, and your doctor is an asshole. But if it is a crucial part of your treatment and you refuse, your doctor is likely frustrated.

I'm sorry if I didn't specify that correctly but I did try the meds before and I was open to them this time. The reason I stopped was due to it causing me more problems instead of helping.

I don't have problems with depression, never have, or suicidal thoughts so I cannot say, "I know how you feel". I have been diagnosed with severe insomnia (been tracking my sleep for years, I average under 3 hours of sleep out of 9 hours in bed w/o meds, and under 5 hours on meds), and as an added bonus, severe ADHD. Because I have an "exceptionally gifted" high IQ I have been able to leverage that to create self control mechanisms to be successful in my professional career. But after battling insomnia for over 18 years, and self medicating for the last 4 years, I finally started recognizing the long term affects.....low focus, no memory, inattentiveness, exhausted, losing my normally extremely high appetite, loss 25 lbs in the last 4 months which is wrecking my self confidence...so I finally went to my doctor (military of course) and said I need help.

4 sleep studies proved that I get less then 30 mins of REM in sleep, and average 3 hours or less in sleep without meds...with meds, not much better. Guess what? They sent me to a clinical psychiatrist. This is because all physical issues (Obstructive sleep apnea) had been corrected, and that leaves neurological/emotional. I didnt show to the appointment....I walked up to the window of the mental health clinic of the navy hospital, looked in and saw almost every seat filled with young sailors, and was too proud to walk in. This was further enforced by when I stand Assistant Command Duty Officer on my duty days, EVERY SINGLE duty day, we have at least one SI (suicidal ideation). It is like the little boy crying wolf....we privately roll our eyes, shrug it off, then take the sailor to the hospital for a three day evaluation...we have to, we are not doctors, and have no place in trying to figure out if it is just a sailor trying to get out of duty or an unpleasant work assignment, or a legitimate need....so they all go....every day, someone goes. I often think about how the "greatest generation" piled into troop transports, and stormed the beaches in the face of horrific gunfire during WWII, and our current generation becomes "suicidal" because someone unfriended them on facebook.....but I realize everyone deals with stress differently.

So I pulled up my big boy panties, and asked for another referral....I did a battery of tests, and talked to her for an hour...the results showed that I was in no way depressed, not in anyway unusually stressed or anxious, just tired....tired of being tired. She put me on specific meds for insomnia, and adderral for ADHD....havent felt this good in years, so focused, so sharp, and much more rested. I hate taking meds, and they are affecting me negatively in some ways....loss of appetite is even worse, desire to workout is minimal....but she said my body should adjust.

The point of this TL : DR is not to whine about my issues, but to point out that we ALL have issues. I have always said if you dig in hard enough into everyone's DNA, you can find an acronym. It takes true strength and courage to say..."I need help". In the military, the tendency (especially in the Army from my experience) is to shrug off and dismiss soldiers reporting "stress"..."PTSD"...."depression" as they assume they are making shit up to get out of deployment, assignment or duty. A lot are unfortunately, but that doesn't help those who truly need some help. I sat next to a woman in one of my classes at Fort Eustis (Saint Leo University has a campus site there) and during class introductions she was bragging about how she was 24 yo and had just got out of the Army last year, and got 100% disability...During break, I looked at her and said, "if it isnt too personal, what was it for?" she replied, "stress, headaches and a bad back." I was like oh wow, did some time in country then huh? She said "No, I was in Supply, but getting diagnosed for PTSD is easy, and they cant disprove headaches and back pain". I was disgusted, I wanted to just slap her. There are thousands of vets who truly have those issues, and pieces of shit like her make it hard for them to get what they need because the government is cracking down on the PTSD VA benefit payouts.

If you need help; be polite, professional, and insistent. In the end, the only one who truly has your best interests as a priority is you. Don't rattle the cage too hard to soon, but if Medical is blowing you off, go up the chain of command. If this psychiatrist isn't working well for you, ask for another one, or a referral for a civilian one. Get the help you need, your life depends on it. I think you said you are 23 yo? You have WAY too much life ahead of you to live to do it feeling miserable. Worse case they may medically discharge you under unsuitability for combat/service, but if they do they have to provide you the after care to get you straight.

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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