Missouri Releases Another Prisoner
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
24-10-2015, 08:01 AM (This post was last modified: 24-10-2015 01:35 PM by yakherder.)
RE: Missouri Releases Another Prisoner
Yes

Some states will pay a predetermined amount of money after an extended wrongful conviction. Beyond that, if you can't demonstrate that the state basically committed a crime themselves in the process of that wrongful conviction, the extent of your options is to accept that shit happens and move on.

'Murican Canadian
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes yakherder's post
24-10-2015, 01:27 PM
RE: Missouri Releases Another Prisoner
(24-10-2015 08:01 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Yes

Some states will pay a predetermined amount of money after an extended wrongful conviction. Beyond that, if you can't demonstrate that the state basically committed a crime themselves in the process of that wrongfully conviction, the extent of your options is to accept that shit happens and move on.

Ouch Undecided

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
24-10-2015, 05:42 PM
RE: Missouri Releases Another Prisoner
(23-10-2015 07:45 AM)itsnotmeitsyou Wrote:  
(23-10-2015 07:29 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  Yeap. And all I did (allegedly) was develop an electronic in-home growth system for AIDS patients who wanted to be able to not have to go to a drug dealer to get their medicine. Wasn't even caught with any actual weed; they only had testimony by my ex-GF, whom I had just dumped after catching her cheating, that told them I was some kind of major player in the local weed market. It was enough to get me 30 years for manufacturing, as if I was making meth or something. They had none of the people I allegedly supplied to, and basically buried me because they were convinced I was part of a supplier network (I wasn't) and I refused to give them names. They kept me in dungeon-like isolation wards, surrounded by people screaming like they were being stabbed 23-hours-a-day, smearing poop, etc, because they wanted to "break" me so I'd give them names and wouldn't make them take me to trial. They would actually come by every week with the jail's psychologist, who was required to "sign off" on me being held in that unit, and ask me if I was ready to talk. When I said no, he'd say not a word, but would sign the paper standing right behind them.

When I was finally (and illegally) convicted, they stuck me into Maximum security facilities because of the length of my sentence, with murderers and rapists, etc. By comparison to the isolation cells in the crazy wards, it was a cake-walk, especially since by then I had gotten very good at jailhouse lawyering-- nothing else to do in that isolation cell but read law books, really.

Thankfully, they also prevented me from producing potentially exonerating evidence at trial, and they allowed some evidence that should not have been admitted, which got my case (eventually) reviewed by the higher courts, after seemingly-endless delays by the prosecution (at one point, they even claimed a lawyer quit ON THE DAY a reply was due to one of my appeals, which bought them another four months to get a reply in, via the new attorney). They did not establish in trial the required elements for such conviction, so the judge had simply removed the elements they could not prove to the jury from the jury instructions, and thus the conviction was baseless. Nine years of my life for nothing.

I'm glad you didn't have to do the full 30 years. You shouldn't have done 30 days, though.

It really disgusts me when I talk to many people about drug convictions. They've been so brainwashed by D.A.R.E. and all the other propaganda that they can't see the plain truth of the abuses that take place. They try to justify things with circular logic "It's illegal because it's bad. How do I know it's bad? Because it's illegal!" and they actually believe the bullshit they are fed about how horrible ALL drug users and anyone involved with them are.

I once was told that marijuana causes people to "rage out" and kill people at random. I had to laugh at the stupidity, especially because I was high out of my mind at the time and just wanted some Fritos and a nap.

The only crime I ever committed after smoking out was mugging my refrigerator.

Oh, and writing some really bad poetry.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Thumpalumpacus's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: