Moving faster than "instantly"?
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30-08-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Moving faster than "instantly"?
Are there anything in our observable universe move faster than instantly? A few years ago in a forum IIRC a positron which are moving backward in time are certainly can move faster than instantly. That's mean it's million times faster than light-speed because it's even move faster than instantly.
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30-08-2013, 07:34 PM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
Can you please give me a numeric value for an 'instant'?

Instant Drinking Beverage is not made instantly.

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30-08-2013, 08:07 PM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(30-08-2013 07:34 PM)DLJ Wrote:  Can you please give me a numeric value for an 'instant'?

Instant Drinking Beverage is not made instantly.

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Well a Moment is 90 seconds (medieval phrase)

The attosecond, also known as a quintillionth of a second, is the timescale of atomic events.

But his problem is he is mixing laymans terms with science (again) as such an instant is not a real measure of time.

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30-08-2013, 08:12 PM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
First of all,never heard of instant in time or speed
second, lightspeed*10^6 dafuq?
Third,cite source

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30-08-2013, 10:51 PM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
I think I recall something in a video about quantum physics the other day where they were talking about particles acting like they existed simultaneously in the past for a nanosecond mathematically or something like that. Maybe what he's talking about.

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31-08-2013, 04:06 AM
 
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
LOL Laugh out load

Of course I know this is an awkward nonsense question btw, but I really wanna know if there are something in our observable universe that can indeed move faster than "instantly" or zero time. About the positron move faster than "instantly", I found that info at Physics Forum a few years ago. I don't remember exactly what's the title of the thread though.
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31-08-2013, 07:30 AM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
Can you search it? Because from what i know,when an object reaches the speed of light,the mass becomes infinite and then requires infinite energy to keep moving

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It's too damn "peopley" out there....
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31-08-2013, 07:49 AM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(31-08-2013 07:30 AM)Lightvader Wrote:  Can you search it? Because from what i know,when an object reaches the speed of light,the mass becomes infinite and then requires infinite energy to keep moving

Not quite - infinite energy to accelerate.

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31-08-2013, 07:53 AM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
I stand corrected

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It's too damn "peopley" out there....
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31-08-2013, 08:03 AM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
Faster than 'instant' is by definition travelling back in time and violating causality (hell, faster than lightspeed is as well). This has never been observed.

However, travelling 'back in time' is one way of describing or conceptualising the behaviour of virtual anti/particle pairs. It's a useful conceit there, but it's not applicable to any other situation.

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