Moving faster than "instantly"?
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01-09-2013, 07:11 PM
 
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(01-09-2013 04:41 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Two entangled quantum states can come to an agreement "instantly" despite being a distance apart that light speed cannot cross in the measured time. No one can really say why Smile

Faster than instantly, though? Well, Feynman diagrams[2] need to account for uncertainty in time and particles travelling backwards in time with similar spooky effects on causality... so perhaps? Wink

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_entanglement
[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram

Thanks for the response. If something moves at infinite speed, is it still considered moving faster than instantly? How about if something, say positron moving at zero time is it considered as faster than "instantly"?
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01-09-2013, 10:40 PM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(30-08-2013 06:59 PM)Mike Wrote:  Are there anything in our observable universe move faster than instantly? A few years ago in a forum IIRC a positron which are moving backward in time are certainly can move faster than instantly. That's mean it's million times faster than light-speed because it's even move faster than instantly.

an 'instant' would indicate a time period, not a speed. Anything can move 'instantaneously' - it just depends on the distances covered during that time.

An infintesimal ETE would by default mean you were traveling at an infinite velocity and able to occupy any point in the known universe at any given time. To our best understanding of the space-time continuum this is impossible.

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01-09-2013, 11:11 PM
 
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(01-09-2013 10:40 PM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  
(30-08-2013 06:59 PM)Mike Wrote:  Are there anything in our observable universe move faster than instantly? A few years ago in a forum IIRC a positron which are moving backward in time are certainly can move faster than instantly. That's mean it's million times faster than light-speed because it's even move faster than instantly.

an 'instant' would indicate a time period, not a speed. Anything can move 'instantaneously' - it just depends on the distances covered during that time.

An infintesimal ETE would by default mean you were traveling at an infinite velocity and able to occupy any point in the known universe at any given time. To our best understanding of the space-time continuum this is impossible.

Can an infinitesimal ETE travels at zero time or moving faster than "instantly"?
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02-09-2013, 06:35 AM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
Is this topic going somewhere, or is that all there is to the question?

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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02-09-2013, 07:55 AM
 
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(02-09-2013 06:35 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Is this topic going somewhere, or is that all there is to the question?

No, I just want the answers to my question. But seeing the majority of the comments, I think moving faster than instantly is impossible, at least in this observable universe. Perhaps.
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06-09-2013, 06:15 PM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(01-09-2013 11:11 PM)Mike Wrote:  
(01-09-2013 10:40 PM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  an 'instant' would indicate a time period, not a speed. Anything can move 'instantaneously' - it just depends on the distances covered during that time.

An infintesimal ETE would by default mean you were traveling at an infinite velocity and able to occupy any point in the known universe at any given time. To our best understanding of the space-time continuum this is impossible.

Can an infinitesimal ETE travels at zero time or moving faster than "instantly"?

...........uh, wow..........I..............I................You really don't understand my answer at all, do you?

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06-09-2013, 08:07 PM
 
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(06-09-2013 06:15 PM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  
(01-09-2013 11:11 PM)Mike Wrote:  Can an infinitesimal ETE travels at zero time or moving faster than "instantly"?

...........uh, wow..........I..............I................You really don't understand my answer at all, do you?

I understand. But actually you said "An infinitesimal ETE would by default mean you were travelling at an infinite velocity and able to occupy any point in the known universe at any given time". If I'm not mistaken, if something moving faster than "instantly" there are no time involved, or zero time. Corrected me if I'm wrong.
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06-09-2013, 08:55 PM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(06-09-2013 08:07 PM)Mike Wrote:  I understand. But actually you said "An infinitesimal ETE would by default mean you were travelling at an infinite velocity and able to occupy any point in the known universe at any given time". If I'm not mistaken, if something moving faster than "instantly" there are no time involved, or zero time. Corrected me if I'm wrong.

As an analogy: relative velocity cannot be less than zero. "Moving slower than stationary" is not a coherent question.

Relative velocity cannot be greater than infinite - it actually cannot be greater than c, but pretending it can be, it couldn't be faster than infinite. This is a consequence of how time and velocity are defined.

I'm not sure you understand the question you're asking.

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10-09-2013, 03:40 AM
RE: Moving faster than "instantly"?
(06-09-2013 08:55 PM)cjlr Wrote:  As an analogy: relative velocity cannot be less than zero. "Moving slower than stationary" is not a coherent question.

As an aside, zero velocity is the measurement of absolute zero. Temperature is, at base, the measurement of energy of moving particles. The more energetic the particle, the greater the movement, the greater the temperature. The lowest temperature you can have then is absolute zero, measured as the complete cessation of all movement of particles being measured. You can't have a lower temperature than absolute zero, because you can't have less motion than none. Thumbsup

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