Music theory
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10-08-2016, 02:02 PM
RE: Music theory
This shit is my jam right here. I want this played at my funeral, but I'm requesting that the performer use my femur, strung with the hair from my head, as the violin bow. Shit, I'd better start growing my hair out now.
Does the performance count as part of the music?




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10-08-2016, 02:03 PM
RE: Music theory
(10-08-2016 01:27 PM)Peebothuhul Wrote:  At work.

Don't forget! You're just thinking in 'Western' terms and styles of music.

Google Japanese instruments and styles for a whole different world of sound.

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I was going to mention the music of India, with the same idea. They don't restrict themselves to 12 notes per octave. Also remember that melodies and melodic phrases can be any length, and the time values of notes can be varied as well as the pitches. Of course, not all combinations will be musically "beautiful", although that is subjective.
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10-08-2016, 04:24 PM
RE: Music theory
(10-08-2016 10:02 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  I'm curious about something. Is there a mathematical equation for how many different tunes can be created with the notes in music?

I'm no musician but from what I know there are 12 notes in an octave but then there are many octaves and so many different beats and chords and instruments that can be mixed up to make a piece of music.

The reason I asked is that there have recently been lawsuits against several musicians for copywriting infringement. Is there a finite number of songs and tunes one can make with the notes we have? I wonder if someone has tried to calculate this number or are there so many variables that it's impossible to come up with a number.

And did my question even make any sense?

There is more or less a mathematical / physical thing to it yes. It is about specific frequencies and how they relate to each other. This is pretty much how we come to an octave that has 12 tones. But it is not the only way of music. Go a bit into the asian direction for example and you get to Pentatonic, which would be pretty much if you played only the black keys on a piano.

The lawsuits of this kind usually have to do with very specific order of tones and their length etc. (simplyfied version coming) Let's say an exact octave with only full tone steps and all quarter tones and no breaks. If this is my song that I copyrighted, someone else comes along and just goes up a terz and plays exactly an octave with all full tone steps and all quarter tones and no breaks then he stole my song. If he changed something, maybe put a break somewhere or whatever, then it is not exactly the same song anymore.
So this happens A LOT in the music industry, that someone takes a successful song, changes the key a little, changes tiny bits and puts a new text on it and call it their own. So if you didn't change enough, then that is copyright enfringment.

I heard the question about the number of possible songs before. Basically there would be some definition missing. For example is any length of song acceptable for the calculation, is the same tunes with and without words then two songs? etc. But that aside, if we are relatively strict with out definition, yes there can be an end when all songs have been written. But that number of songs is so enormous that I don't think we will get there in our lifetime Wink or anytime soon for that matter.

I hope this helps.

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10-08-2016, 05:41 PM
RE: Music theory
(10-08-2016 04:24 PM)Leela Wrote:  
(10-08-2016 10:02 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  I'm curious about something. Is there a mathematical equation for how many different tunes can be created with the notes in music?

I'm no musician but from what I know there are 12 notes in an octave but then there are many octaves and so many different beats and chords and instruments that can be mixed up to make a piece of music.

The reason I asked is that there have recently been lawsuits against several musicians for copywriting infringement. Is there a finite number of songs and tunes one can make with the notes we have? I wonder if someone has tried to calculate this number or are there so many variables that it's impossible to come up with a number.

And did my question even make any sense?

There is more or less a mathematical / physical thing to it yes. It is about specific frequencies and how they relate to each other. This is pretty much how we come to an octave that has 12 tones. But it is not the only way of music. Go a bit into the asian direction for example and you get to Pentatonic, which would be pretty much if you played only the black keys on a piano.

The lawsuits of this kind usually have to do with very specific order of tones and their length etc. (simplyfied version coming) Let's say an exact octave with only full tone steps and all quarter tones and no breaks. If this is my song that I copyrighted, someone else comes along and just goes up a terz and plays exactly an octave with all full tone steps and all quarter tones and no breaks then he stole my song. If he changed something, maybe put a break somewhere or whatever, then it is not exactly the same song anymore.
So this happens A LOT in the music industry, that someone takes a successful song, changes the key a little, changes tiny bits and puts a new text on it and call it their own. So if you didn't change enough, then that is copyright enfringment.

I heard the question about the number of possible songs before. Basically there would be some definition missing. For example is any length of song acceptable for the calculation, is the same tunes with and without words then two songs? etc. But that aside, if we are relatively strict with out definition, yes there can be an end when all songs have been written. But that number of songs is so enormous that I don't think we will get there in our lifetime Wink or anytime soon for that matter.

I hope this helps.

Thanks! I sit around thinking about stuff like this sometimes. Silly me. Tongue There was a music copyright infringement case in the news this morning, I can't remember who the two artists were, but it got me to thinking about this subject.

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10-08-2016, 06:25 PM
RE: Music theory
(10-08-2016 01:03 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  It it possible to run out of songs then? There must be a finite combination of notes, half notes and octaves, etc. that one can combine to make a song or a tune. Sometimes I think we're getting close what with some of the lawsuits. Lol.

Not in myopinion. It is like can we run out of novels because we only have 26 letters.

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10-08-2016, 07:56 PM
RE: Music theory
(10-08-2016 02:02 PM)cactus Wrote:  This shit is my jam right here. I want this played at my funeral, but I'm requesting that the performer use my femur, strung with the hair from my head, as the violin bow. Shit, I'd better start growing my hair out now.
Does the performance count as part of the music?




It does have an elegiac tone to it. Not sure about the hair; you may need to check out whether it will work, beforehand.
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