Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
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17-08-2016, 12:02 AM (This post was last modified: 17-08-2016 02:35 AM by Thumpalumpacus.)
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(16-08-2016 02:20 PM)SYZ Wrote:  
(16-08-2016 02:01 PM)morondog Wrote:  Which, if you are the judge, opens the door to abuse. All they have to do is characterise their victims as "zealots" and you'll rubber stamp anything they do.

You really want that? She's going through the proper channels. She's not drumming up a riot. She's bringing a case, *as any citizen has a right to do*.

A "zealot" can be described as a person who's uncompromising in pursuit of their religious ideals and beliefs. As was Al Matar in choosing to wear religiously imposed religious garb—which is out of keeping with the social norms of the Western society she's chosen to live in, and which totally hides her identity in a secure public place. Whenever we visited mosques in Islamic countries, my wife covered her head, and we both removed our shoes as a mark of common courtesy. We also had no expectations of consuming alcohol in our hotels, or in restaurants etc.

So... when Westerners visit and/or work in Islamic countries, we're more than happy to respect their religious traditions, but when Muslims visit our countries, the same respect is not shown towards our Western way of life? And we're expected to bend over backwards and to sit by and see this happening day after day?

All Western countries should follow Switzerland's lead and ban the burqa in public. And impose a $10,000 fine on anybody flouting this law, as the Swiss have recently.

The last time I checked, one reason Western culture is touted by its fans is its tolerance. Are you saying we should follow the example of Muslim countries and demand everyone abide our mores on pain of punishment?
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17-08-2016, 01:11 AM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 12:02 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  
(16-08-2016 02:20 PM)SYZ Wrote:  A "zealot" can be described as a person who's uncompromising in pursuit of their religious ideals and beliefs. As was Al Matar in choosing to wear religiously imposed religious garb—which is out of keeping with the social norms of the Western society she's chosen to live in, and which totally hides her identity in a secure public place. Whenever we visited mosques in Islamic countries, my wife covered her head, and we both removed our shoes as a mark of common courtesy. We also had no expectations of consuming alcohol in our hotels, or in restaurants etc.

So... when Westerners visit and/or work in Islamic countries, we're more than happy to respect their religious traditions, but when Muslims visit our countries, the same respect is not shown towards our Western way of life? And we're expected to bend over backwards and to sit by and see this happening day after day?

All Western countries should follow Switzerland's lead and ban the burqa in public. And impose a $10,000 fine on anybody flouting this law, as the Swiss have recently.

The last time I checked, one reason Western culture is touted by its fans is its tolerance. Are you saying we should follow the example of Muslim coutries and demand everyone abide our mores on pain of punishment?

Further, she is completely within the law at all times and the response is "well she deserved it"??? What. The. Fuck?

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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17-08-2016, 06:11 AM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 01:11 AM)morondog Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 12:02 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  The last time I checked, one reason Western culture is touted by its fans is its tolerance. Are you saying we should follow the example of Muslim coutries and demand everyone abide our mores on pain of punishment?

Further, she is completely within the law at all times and the response is "well she deserved it"??? What. The. Fuck?

No - she wasn't.

When the cops shouted "stop" - and she didn't -- she was no longer in compliance with the law.

What part of that aren't you willing to accept?

Are you saying the cops shouldn't be able to stop people who they deem suspicious?? If that's the case - why bother having cops???

.......

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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17-08-2016, 07:19 AM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 06:11 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 01:11 AM)morondog Wrote:  Further, she is completely within the law at all times and the response is "well she deserved it"??? What. The. Fuck?

No - she wasn't.

When the cops shouted "stop" - and she didn't -- she was no longer in compliance with the law.

What part of that aren't you willing to accept?

Are you saying the cops shouldn't be able to stop people who they deem suspicious?? If that's the case - why bother having cops???

.......

*According to the cops* they shouted stop. According to her they didn't. And even if I grant that, what part of not listening to a cop implies that getting forcibly stripped is then acceptable?

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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17-08-2016, 07:34 AM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 06:11 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 01:11 AM)morondog Wrote:  Further, she is completely within the law at all times and the response is "well she deserved it"??? What. The. Fuck?

No - she wasn't.

When the cops shouted "stop" - and she didn't -- she was no longer in compliance with the law.

What part of that aren't you willing to accept?

Are you saying the cops shouldn't be able to stop people who they deem suspicious?? If that's the case - why bother having cops???

.......

There is probably a good reason they did not charge her with disobeying a lawful order.

The video shows her getting into the L station. She is behind quite a few people facing in front. She does not see the cops until they are upon her. There is traffic on the street below. Chicago is a loud place. Someone shouting or even screaming stop, would not necessarily distract anyone. Let alone command their attention. Probably less so for someone whose ears are covered in a burka. It's all lost in the normal commotion of a big city.

That aside, there are other legitimate reasons why someone may not stop when told to do so. They may be deaf. Mentally handicapped. Deep in thought. They may not know you are police; maybe because they didn't see you...

Needless to say, she was charged and found innocent of any wrongdoing.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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17-08-2016, 07:56 AM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(16-08-2016 06:07 AM)Tomasia Wrote:  Yea, next time an atheist women gets raped or molested, lets shout about how she deserved it for not believing that morality is subjective, for subscribing to an ideology in which there is no objective right and wrong.

"Don't whine about being molested bitch, since you think that morality is a matter of personal opinion."

You are truly a disgusting, even nauseating individual.

Shall I quote the bible versus advocating, even ordering rape? Incest? Abortion? Selling a rape victim to the rapist?

And you dare lecture us on the morality of your imaginary god?

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17-08-2016, 08:07 AM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 07:34 AM)tomilay Wrote:  There is probably a good reason they did not charge her with disobeying a lawful order.

That aside, there are other legitimate reasons why someone may not stop when told to do so. They may be deaf. Mentally handicapped. Deep in thought. They may not know you are police; maybe because they didn't see you...

Excellent points along with wearing earbuds or a Bluetooth device or earbuds with a mic. Many times I have encountered people that I thought had said something to me only to find out they are talking on their phone through an earpiece.

And if she was doing nothing wrong and there are dozens or hundreds of other people around, why would she think someone yelling stop (if they did) was talking to her?

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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17-08-2016, 08:23 AM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 06:11 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  What part of that aren't you willing to accept?

Considering the history of the Chicago Police department, I feel comfortable in disbelieving anything they say. Anything that is not thoroughly supported by evidence.

MODS: I apologize in advance for posting a text wall. However I think in this instance, the sheer volume makes a critical point.

Quote:Controversies and Brutality
Over the years, the Chicago Police Department has been the subject of a number of scandals, police misconduct and other controversies:

Summerdale scandals
The Chicago Police Department did not face large-scale reorganization efforts until 1960 under Mayor Richard J. Daley. That year, eight officers from the Summerdale police district on Chicago's North Side were accused of operating a large-scale burglary ring. The Summerdale case dominated the local press, and became the biggest police-related scandal in the city's history at the time. Mayor Daley appointed a committee to make recommendations for improvements to the police department. The action resulted in the creation of a five-member board charged with nominating a superintendent to be the chief authority over police officers, enacting rules and regulations governing the police system, submitting budget requests to the city council, and overseeing disciplinary cases involving officers. Criminologist O.W. Wilson was brought on as Superintendent of Police, and served until 1967 when he retired.

1968 Democratic National Convention
Both Daley and the Chicago Police Department faced a great deal of criticism for the department's actions during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, which was held in Chicago from August 26 to 29, 1968.

The convention was site of a series of protests, mainly over the war in Vietnam. Despite the poor behavior of some protesters, there was widespread criticism that the Chicago Police and National Guard used excessive force. Time published an article stating;

With billy clubs, tear gas and Mace, the blue-shirted, blue-helmeted cops violated the civil rights of countless innocent citizens and contravened every accepted code of professional police discipline. No one could accuse the Chicago cops of discrimination. They savagely attacked hippies, yippies, New Leftists, revolutionaries, dissident Democrats, newsmen, photographers, passers-by, clergymen and at least one handicapped. Winston Churchill's journalist grandson got roughed up. Even Dan Rather (the future CBS News anchor) who was on the floor doing a report during the convention got roughed up by the Chicago Police Department. Playboy's Hugh Hefner took a whack on the backside. The police even victimized a member of the British Parliament, Mrs. Anne Kerr, a vacationing Laborite who was maced outside the Conrad Hilton and hustled off to the lockup.
Subsequently, the Walker Report to the U.S. National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence called the police response a "police riot," assigning blame for the mayhem in the streets to the Chicago Police.

The Black Panther raid
On December 4, 1969, Black Panther Party leaders Fred Hampton and Mark Clark were shot and killed by officers working for the Cook County state's attorney. Though the police claimed they had been attacked by heavily armed Panthers, subsequent investigation showed that most bullets fired came from police weapons. Relatives of the two dead men eventually won a multimillion-dollar judgment against the city. For many African Americans, the incident symbolized prejudice and lack of restraint among the largely white police. The incident led to growing black voter disaffection with the Democratic machine.

Ryan Harris murder
On July 28, 1998, 11-year-old girl, Ryan Harris, was found raped and murdered in a vacant lot in the city's Englewood neighborhood. The homicide caught the nation's attention when, 12 days after Ryan's body was found, authorities, with the blessing of police command, charged a 7-year-old boy and 8-year-old boy with the murder, making them the youngest murder suspects in the nation at the time.[28] Semen found at the scene and subsequent DNA tests cleared the boys of the crime and pointed to convicted sex offender Floyd Durr. The boys each filed lawsuits against the city, which were eventually settled for millions of dollars. Durr pleaded guilty to the rape of Harris, but never admitted to her murder.

Russ/Haggerty shootings
In the summer of 1999, two unarmed black motorists, Robert Russ and LaTanya Haggerty, were both fatally shot in separate incidents involving the Chicago Police. In the first incident, Russ, an honor student and star football player for Northwestern University, was shot inside of his car following a high-speed chase and after what the police claim was a struggle with the officer who shot him. In the second, Haggarty, a computer analyst, was shot by a female officer. Charges of racism against the CPD persisted, despite the fact that officers in both incidents were also black.[citation needed] Both shootings resulted in lawsuits and Haggerty's family reached an $18 million settlement with the city.

In Malcolm Gladwell's book on the cognitive function of snap judgments Blink, well-known criminologist and police administrator James Fyfe described Chicago police instructions in cases such as Russ's as "very detailed" and states that as a matter of record the officers involved all broke procedure and let the situation become unnecessarily deadly for the suspect. For instance, after claiming to see him drive erratically the officers engaged in driving pursuit with Russ. The pursuit labeled "high-speed" never rose above seventy miles per hour, yet even at this speed, Fyfe contends that the adrenaline rush of the chase coupled with the officers reliance in their numbers led to their ignoring any impulses to maintain rational thinking in a potentially non-deadly situation and to speed up a process that both allowed and required taking things more slowly and methodically. Russ's car spun out on the Ryan Expressway at which point several officers quickly approached his vehicle. According to Gladwell, the false safety of numbers gave the three officers "the bravado to rush the car." Fyfe adds, "The lawyers [for the police] were saying that this was a fast-breaking situation. But it was only fast-breaking because the cops let it become one. He was stopped. He wasn't going anywhere." Fyfe describes police procedure and the events leading to Russ's death thus,"[According to police instructions] You are not supposed to approach the car. You are supposed to ask the driver to get out. Well, two of the cops ran up ahead and opened the passenger side door. The other [officer] was on the other side, yelling at Russ to open the door. But Russ just sat there. I don't know what was going through his head. But he didn't respond. So this cop smashes the left rear window of his car and fires a single shot, and it hits Russ in the hand and chest. The cop says that he said, 'Show me your hands, show me your hands,' and he's claiming now that Russ was trying to grab his gun. I don't know if that was the case. I have to accept the cop's claim. But it's beside the point. It's still an unjustified shooting because he shouldn't have been anywhere near the car, and he shouldn't have broken the window."

Gladwell also points out that the Russ and Haggerty killings occurred on the same night.

Joseph Miedzianowski
In April 2001, Joseph Miedzianowski was convicted of racketeering and drug conspiracy during much of his 22-year career with the department. In January 2003 he was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole. His partner John Galligan and 24 other drug dealers were also arrested as part of the same investigation.

William Hanhardt
In October 2001, Deputy Superintendent William Hanhardt pleaded guilty to running a nationwide jewel-theft ring that over twenty years may have stolen five million dollars' worth of diamonds and other gems. He had served with the department for 33 years and was sentenced to twelve years in federal custody.[35]

Burge abuse allegations
Perhaps no other incident exemplifies abuse concerns by Chicago Police officers more than the allegations against former Commander Jon Burge, who has been accused of abusing more than two-hundred mostly African-American men from 1972 to 1991 in order to coerce confessions to crimes. Alleged victims claimed that Burge and his crew of detectives had them beaten, suffocated, burned, and treated with electric shock. In 1993, Burge was fired from the department, and is currently collecting his police pension. In summer 2006, special prosecutors assigned to probe the allegations determined that they had enough evidence to prove crimes against Burge and others, but "regrettably" could not bring charges because the statute of limitations had passed.[36] In January 2008, the City Council approved a $19.8 million settlement with four men who claimed abuse against Burge and his men.

In October 2008, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, had Burge arrested on charges of obstruction of justice and perjury in relation to a civil suit regarding the torture allegations against him. Burge was eventually convicted on all counts on June 28, 2010 and was sentenced to four and one half years in federal prison on January 21, 2011.

May 6, 2015, Chicago City Council approved "reparations" of $5.5 million to victims of the torture, after spending $100 million in previous legal settlements. In addition, an apology was offered, and a promise to teach school children about these historical events.

Nurse arrests
On November 19, 2002, Rachelle Jackson, a registered nurse, was on her way to work when she witnessed a vehicle accident involving a patrol car, in which Officer Kelly Brogan was dazed and her partner was unconscious. Fearing an explosion, Jackson removed both officers from the vehicle, and voluntarily went to the police station under the assumption of giving a statement after being informed that Brogan's service weapon was stolen. Instead she was interrogated for two days with little food or sleep and no access to a bathroom. She was coerced into signing a statement that she had battered Brogan and taken her gun. She was jailed for 10 months before the charges were dismissed. Jackson was awarded $7.9 million by a jury in her lawsuit against Brogan and the city. In 2009, the amount was reduced to $1.9 million. More than half the original verdict was awarded for "intentional inflection of emotional distress."

In a similar case, in 2009, nurse Lisa Hoffman was on-duty when a police officer brought in a suspected DUI driver and demanded a blood test. Because the individual was not admitted as a patient, Hoffman had to consult her supervisor as proper procedure. According to Hoffman, the officer then became combative and argued with her to the point security had to remove him. He returned moments later, placed her in handcuffs and kept her in his patrol car for over 45 minutes, and was even seen smiling on the surveillance camera as she was kept in the vehicle. She sued the officer and city for false arrest and excessive force because her wrists were bruised from the handcuffs. The city settled for $78,000. The Chicago police never reported any disciplinary action against the officer.

Bar attack
In 2007, security camera footage surfaced of an intoxicated off-duty police officer, Anthony Abbate, punching and kicking a female bartender, Karolina Obrycka. Abbate was shown in the video punching and kicking Obrycka at Jesse's Shortstop Inn on February 19, 2007, after Obrycka refused to serve him any more alcohol. Abbate was later arrested, charged with felony battery, and stripped of police powers after TV news stations aired the footage. The Chicago Police soon terminated Abbate from the force, but questions remained over the city's handling of the case.

Further controversy arose when Abbate was allowed to enter his courtroom hearing through a side door, in order to shield himself from the press. Allegations surfaced that the police ticketed the vehicles of news organizations and threatened reporters with arrest. In the wake of this, Superintendent Cline announced that he would demote the Captain who gave the orders, and launch investigations into the actions of the other officers involved.

On April 27, 2007, 14 additional charges against Abbate were announced. These included official misconduct, conspiracy, intimidation, and speaking with a witness. Abbate pleaded not guilty to all 15 charges during a brief hearing on May 16, 2007.

Referring to Abbate, Superintendent Phil Cline stated, "He's tarnished our image worse than anybody else in the history of the department." The video of the attack has been viewed worldwide on 24-hour news channels and has garnered more than 100,000 views on YouTube. In the wake of this scandal and another similar scandal involving another videotaped police beating at a bar, Cline announced his retirement on April 2, 2007. While both men have denied it, some believe that Cline retired under pressure from Mayor Richard M. Daley. Daley has since announced a plan to create an independent police review authority to replace the current Office of Professional Standards, which is under the jurisdiction of the police department.

On April 30, 2007 a lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois against the city of Chicago and Abbate and several other individuals by attorneys representing Obrycka. On November 13, 2012, a federal jury found that a "widespread code of silence" within the Chicago Police Department had allowed Abbate to feel that he could attack Obrycka without fear of reprisal. They also found that Abbate participated in a conspiracy to cover up the attack. The jury awarded Obrycka $850,000 in damages.

Abbate was convicted of aggravated battery, a felony, on June 2, 2009. Cook County Circuit Judge John J. Fleming rejected Abbate's claims that he had acted in self-defense. However, since Obrycka testified that Abbate had not identified himself as an officer during the attack Abbate was acquitted of official misconduct charges. Abbate faced up to five years in prison for the attack. On June 23, 2009, Abbate received two years’ probation including a curfew between 8 pm and 6 am, mandatory attendance at anger management classes, and 130 hours of community service.

On December 15, 2009, Abbate was officially fired from the CPD after a mandatory review by the Chicago Civilian Police Board. The firing was a simple formality, as the CPD does not allow convicted felons to serve on the force.

Jerome Finnigan
Chicago Police Officers Jerome Finnigan, Keith Herrera, Carl Suchocki, and Thomas Sherry were indicted in September 2007 for robbery, kidnapping, home invasion, and other charges. They were alleged to have robbed drug dealers and ordinary citizens of money, drugs, and guns. The officers were all part of Special Operations Sections (SOS). The officers had allegedly victimized citizens for years, however, it was not until 2004 that allegations of misconduct were investigated. According to the State's Attorney, the tip-off was that the officers repeatedly missed court dates and allowed alleged drug dealers to go free. Several lawsuits alleging misconduct on behalf of Finnigan and his team have been filed in federal court. Since the original indictments, Jerome Finnigan has also been charged with attempting to have several fellow officers killed. Since the scandal involving Finnigan, SOS has been disbanded.

On February 11, 2009, charges against Chicago Police Department officers Tom Sherry and Carl Suchocki were dropped. A Cook County judge dismissed all criminal charges accusing them of robbery and home invasion after some evidence was proven to be false, and witnesses in the case against Sherry and Suchocki were unable to place the officers at the scene of the crime. Charges against Herrera and Finnigan, however, are still pending. As of September 25, 2009, seven former SOS officers have pleaded guilty to charges relating to the SOS scandal. The investigation is ongoing as police officers continue to come forward and cooperate with the state and federal investigation.

Shooting of Flint Farmer
On June 7, 2011, Flint Farmer was fatally shot three times in the back by Chicago police officer Gildardo Sierra. Sierra and a partner had responded to a domestic disturbance call allegedly involving Farmer. When confronted by the police, Farmer fled. Sierra shot at Farmer multiple times, hitting him in the leg and abdomen. Publicly available police video shows Sierra circle the prone Farmer as three bright flashes emit from approximately waist level. The coroner who performed the autopsy on Farmer reported that Farmer could have survived the shots to the leg and abdomen, but any of the three shots through the back would have been fatal.

Officer Sierra had been involved in two other shootings in 2011. Although the Chicago police department ruled the shooting justified, by October 23, 2011 Sierra had been stripped of his police powers and the FBI had opened an investigation into the incident. Eventually, no charges were brought against the officers. The city settled the civil case with Farmer's family for $4.1 million but did not admit fault.

Richard Zuley
After his retirement multiple inquiries into overturned convictions that had relied on confessions he coerced triggered the Conviction Integrity Unit of the Cook County State's Attorney's Office to plan to subpoena Zuley's entire complaint history.

Zuley faces multiple lawsuits from individuals who claim he framed them, or beat confessions from them. Lathierial Boyd, who launched one lawsuit, claims Zuley framed him for a killing outside a nightclub in 1990. Anthony Garrett, who received a 100-year sentence for killing a seven-year-old boy, alleged Zuley beat his confession out of him.

On February 18, 2015, Spencer Ackerman, reporting in The Guardian, covered Zuley's alleged involvement in the torture and forced confessions of several homicide cases in Chicago and revealed additional details of the interrogation and torture of Guantanamo captive Mohamedou Ould Slahi.

Jason Meisner, writing in the Chicago Tribune, reported that The Guardian characterized Zuley's use of torture as "brutal and ineffective". Memos Zuley wrote, quoted in the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on the CIA's use of torture, described him using "stress positions"—the shackling of interrogation subjects in painful postures for extended periods of time. Zuley currently faces lawsuits in Chicago for using these techniques against American civilians.

Homan Square
The Guardian reported in February 2015 that the Chicago Police Department "operates an off-the-books interrogation compound, rendering Americans unable to be found by family or attorneys while locked inside what lawyers say is the domestic equivalent of a CIA black site." The Guardian added that the facility, the Homan Square Police Warehouse at 1011 S. Homan Ave in Chicago (41.8684°N 87.71°W), "has long been the scene of secretive work by special police units." The Guardian said that interviews with local attorneys and one protester "describe operations that deny access to basic constitutional rights ... The secretive warehouse ... trains its focus on Americans, most often poor, black and brown ... Witnesses, suspects or other Chicagoans who end up inside do not appear to have a public, searchable record entered into a database indicating where they are, as happens when someone is booked at a precinct. Lawyers and relatives insist there is no way of finding their whereabouts. Those lawyers who have attempted to gain access to Homan Square are most often turned away, even as their clients remain in custody inside."

After the Guardian published the story, the Chicago Police provided a statement saying, without specifics, that there is nothing improper taking place at what it called the “sensitive” location, home to undercover units. The statement said “CPD [Chicago Police Department] abides by all laws, rules and guidelines pertaining to any interviews of suspects or witnesses, at Homan Square or any other CPD facility. If lawyers have a client detained at Homan Square, just like any other facility, they are allowed to speak to and visit them.” The Guardian said several attorneys and one Homan Square arrestee have denied this. The CPD statement continued by saying “There are always records of anyone who is arrested by CPD, and this is not any different at Homan Square.” The Guardian said the Chicago Police statement did not address how long into an arrest or detention those records are generated or their availability to the public, and that a department spokesperson did not respond to a detailed request for clarification.

Laquan McDonald
In October 2014, 17-year old Laquan McDonald was fatally shot by Officer Jason Van Dyke. The killing sparked protests and calls for the mayor to resign. A video released revealed McDonald walking down a street, carrying a knife. McDonald was walking parallel to the two police cars when he was shot 16 times. A criminal complaint filed in Cook County Circuit Court revealed that Van Dyke was the only officer to shoot. The complaint also said that McDonald was on PCP at the time of his death. Protestors were frustrated that the video took 13 months to release. A freelance journalist sued to have the footage released as it was a public record. A judge found in the reporter's favor and the video became public in November 2015.

Van Dyke was charged with six counts of first-degree murder and one count of official misconduct. He remained on desk duty after the shooting. Van Dyke had a history of complaints in his career but was cleared in a majority of the cases. He pleaded not guilty on December 29, 2015 to the charges against him. After his arraignment, his attorney, Daniel Herbert, said that he would be looking for evidence to clear his client's name.

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Help for the living. Hope for the dead. ~ R.G. Ingersoll

Freedom offers opportunity. Opportunity confers responsibility. Responsibility to use the freedom we enjoy wisely, honestly and humanely. ~ Noam Chomsky
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17-08-2016, 02:42 PM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 12:02 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  The last time I checked, one reason Western culture is touted by its fans is its tolerance. Are you saying we should follow the example of Muslim countries and demand everyone abide our mores on pain of punishment?

Wow... that's a quantum leap there! "Pain" of punishment? Big Grin

Anyway, no I didn't say or intend to imply that we should "follow the example of Muslim countries". They're your words; please don't ascribe wrongful meaning to my comments.

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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17-08-2016, 03:01 PM
RE: Muslim Woman Sues Chicago Police
(17-08-2016 01:11 AM)morondog Wrote:  [...]
Further, she is completely within the law at all times and the response is "well she deserved it"??? What. The. Fuck?

Nope. She failed to obey a lawful command issued by a police officer. In Australia (at least) that's defined as breaking the law. At any rate, the young woman well ahead of her heard the command, partially stopped, and turned around (clearly visible on the tape).

And people who break the law must suffer the consequences of their decision. If Al Matar had simply stopped, and spoken with the police, none of this would've happened. And I also note that nobody has explained why this woman was covering the only "visible" part of her body—her eyes—with dark glasses, and in a subway. If I were a patrolling LEO, that'd be enough to at least arouse my interest in such an individual—who, of course could well have been a male in disguise acting with malicious intent.

Also, why did he/she "pull away" from the police? Why refuse to talk to them and fight with them while "clutching" his/her backpack containing only a cut lunch?

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