Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
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22-09-2015, 09:55 AM (This post was last modified: 22-09-2015 10:14 AM by goodwithoutgod.)
Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
As I have stated many times...the most disgusting problem with the faith of Islam, and Muslim culture is the Bachi Bazi tradition. Whenever I slap a muslim with this tradition's existence I get the canned response "that is outlawed"...yes, due to international pressure they have passed some laws stating several distasteful traditions of Islam are unlawful...but they don't enforce the law for infractions, nor hold anyone accountable. In fact, American service members have been discharged when they step in and stop the sexual assault of a little boy by a coalition Muslim military commander as per the below story on CNN today.

For many centuries, Muslim armies would purge Christian and Hindu peasant villages of their menfolk and send the women and children to harems and the thriving child sex slave markets deep in the Islamic world.

When it comes to child marriage, contemporary clerics warn fellow Muslims against succumbing to the disapproval of the Christian West: "It behooves those who call for setting a minimum age for marriage to fear Allah and not contradict his Sharia, or try to legislate things Allah did not permit. For laws are Allah’s province; and legislation is his excusive right, to be shared by none other. And among these are the rules governing marriage.”

The Ayatollah Khomeini, who married a 12-year-old girl, even gave his consent to using infants for sexual pleasure (although warning against full penetration until the baby is a few years older).

Some clerics show relative mercy on underage girls by advocating a process known as "thighing" (also known as child molestation in the West). According to a recent fatwa (number 23672), an imam answers this question: "My parents married me to a young girl who hasn't yet reached puberty. How can I enjoy her sexually?" by telling the 'man' that he may "hug her, kiss her, and ejaculate between her legs."

A prominent member of Saudi Arabia's highest religious council said in 2012 that girls can be married "even if they are in the cradle," then went on to explain that intercourse may occur whenever "they are capable of being placed beneath and bearing the weight of the man."

How about let's stop the bacha bazi tradition, you know the hiring and raping of little boys...how you can allow an existing tradition to exist that is based on abducting or hiring little boys as private sex slaves, while, and get this folks....executing anyone for committing homosexual acts....what the fuck do you think a 60 yo man raping a little boy is? mentorship? tradition?

http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/22/asia/afgha...index.html

"
(CNN)—The two U.S. soldiers say they used physical force to drive home their message to the Afghan police commander who had been sexually abusing a boy.

"I picked him up, threw him to the ground multiple times and Charles did the same thing," Dan Quinn, who was a U.S. Army captain at the time, told CNN. "We basically had to make sure that he fully understood that if he ever went near that boy or his mother again, there was going to be hell to pay."

The actions of Quinn and the other soldier, Sgt. 1st Class Charles Martland, against the American-backed police commander displeased their superiors in the U.S. military.

Quinn says he and Martland were relieved of their duties shortly afterward. Quinn has since left the military and Martland is now being involuntarily separated from the Army.

They had directly confronted a thorny issue for U.S. forces in Afghanistan: the subculture of bacha bazi, or "boy play," in which young Afghans are used as sex slaves by grown men.

For U.S. service members in Afghanistan, the abuse of children is infuriatingly hard to stop, especially when it's carried out by Afghan commanders allied with American-led forces.




Unable to step in


"The reason we weren't able to step in with these local rape cases was we didn't want to undermine the authority of the local government," Quinn said. "We were trying to build up the local government. Us acting after the local government fails to can certainly undermine their credibility."

The New York Times reported this week that U.S. soldiers and Marines in Afghanistan have been instructed not to intervene in the abuse of Afghan boys by U.S. allies, even in some cases in which it's taken place on military bases.

The Pentagon denies that telling soldiers to look the other way is official practice.

"We have never had a policy in place that directs any military member, or any government personnel overseas to ignore human rights abuses," spokesman Capt. Jeff Davis said. "Any sexual abuse, no matter who the alleged perpetrator and no matter who the victim, is completely unacceptable and reprehensible."

The abuse of boys by powerful Afghan men has been reported by CNN and other international news organizations in the past.

"I had a boy because every commander had one," Mestary, a former commander of the Northern Alliance that fought against the Taliban, said in a PBS documentary, "The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan," in 2010. "There's competition amongst the commanders. If I didn't have a boy, I couldn't compete with the others."


'A very painful subject'


Terrorism expert Jessica Stern told CNN she has spoken to several U.S. service members who say they were disturbed by what they saw in Afghanistan.

"They must have felt they couldn't respond in the way they would have liked to," she said. "It was clearly a very painful subject."

She said they believed that "the fear is that if we were to intervene, we wouldn't have the kind of close working relationship that we need" with Afghan security forces.

The Afghan Interior Ministry said it received reports of sexual abuse of children by police officials in 2011 and 2012 but has since taken steps to address the problem.

"We have started taking the issue very seriously and have brought fundamental changes," Sediq Sediqqi, a spokesman for the ministry, told CNN.

Quinn said he hoped Martland's career could yet be saved.

"He is the best soldier I've ever served with," Quinn said. "He's the reason why I joined the Special Forces regiment, was to work with soldiers like Charles Martland. ... All he wants to do is continue to serve our country with distinction."

U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter, a Republican from California, has taken up Martland's case with Defense Secretary Ash Carter in an attempt to keep the solider in the Army.

"Martland stood up to a child rapist," Hunter, a former major in the Marines, wrote in a letter to Carter last month. "I trust that you will give this case the attention it demands."

But after a decade of training with U.S. forces, it seems some Afghan commanders are continuing the abuse unchecked."

AngryAngryAngryCensoredCensoredCensored

Un Fucking believable.

I would LOVE if a believer of Islam would ever stay in this forum for more than a 2 day driveby and stand up and answer for this....

And under concern for maintaining positive relations with child rapists, the American Military are discharging soldiers like this who had the audacity to step in and stop a child being raped.............

Lets not ask the hard questions...."heaven" forbid. Angry

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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22-09-2015, 11:05 AM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
Utterly disgusting...and kudos to those two U.S. Soldiers.
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22-09-2015, 11:47 AM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
Some of the things I've seen people do make child molestation look pretty tame, and so much of it happens right under our noses but out of reach nonetheless due to rules of engagement that are, perhaps, a little too focused on the bigger picture.

One of the experiences I mentioned on a different thread was in regards to a group of militia who had set up outside of a refugee camp set up in response to the shit that was going on in Darfur, which the world refused to acknowledge as genocide due to the legal implications of labeling it as such and the responsibilities which that would incur. Nonetheless, "safe" camps were set up by the U.N. for people to take refuge in. Immigration officials from various countries set up in those camps to start interviewing people to determine whether or not they were eligible for immigration. Though they were, indeed, relatively safe from the extreme violence they had run from while within the borders of the camps, because not everything they needed was available (namely water), their only option for survival while waiting for their prospective host countries to decide whether or not they were worthy was to venture out into the warzone, so to speak. Those militia groups were well aware of this, and presented a constant threat to them. Our rules of engagement were limited to the protection of the camp. If we were to take it upon ourselves to go rogue and get into a scrap outside of its walls, we'd probably be in jail for war crimes. Imagine the look on a 16 year old girl's face as she comes back to the camp, having been gang raped for perhaps the 10th time in a row, in an effort to provide for her younger brothers whose parents were savagely murdered in an attempt to prevent them from being conscripted as child soldiers. That shit haunts even the hardest of people. Those of us who chose to follow the rules are free today, but that freedom came at a price, and it was someone else who paid that price. Sometimes I wonder how differently I'd act when I was younger if I had the mentality I do now, after a decade of reflecting on my actions and the results of those actions. One of the many reasons I chose to leave corrections last year, and law enforcement in general, (besides the higher paycheck) is because I don't think I have enough sanity left to follow the rules anymore. If someone is a danger to society, and I don't believe the system is adequately addressing the problem, I can't promise that I'm not beyond going vigilante.

In Afghanistan, our unit actually became friends with a young boy who would sell us sweet bread and other random stuff during our frequent convoys through his village. We thought we were doing the right thing by paying him well for the service he was providing, given the substantial income gap. But nope, one day other boys got jealous of his success and murdered him in an effort to take over his business. None of the kids involved were even teenagers yet. We had to stop driving through there, because once word got out what happened I imagine there were a number of people who would have flipped and gone on a little boy hunt. Imagine the international headlines that would have triggered, and how little of the truth behind what actually happened ever would have been revealed.

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22-09-2015, 11:53 AM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
So much wrong in this world. I would have promoted those two US service men.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
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22-09-2015, 11:55 AM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
(22-09-2015 11:47 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Some of the things I've seen people do make child molestation look pretty tame, and so much of it happens right under our noses but out of reach nonetheless due to rules of engagement that are, perhaps, a little too focused on the bigger picture.

One of the experiences I mentioned on a different thread was in regards to a group of militia who had set up outside of a refugee camp set up in response to the shit that was going on in Darfur, which the world refused to acknowledge as genocide due to the legal implications of labeling it as such and the responsibilities which that would incur. Nonetheless, "safe" camps were set up by the U.N. for people to take refuge in. Immigration officials from various countries set up in those camps to start interviewing people to determine whether or not they were eligible for immigration. Though they were, indeed, relatively safe from the extreme violence they had run from while within the borders of the camps, because not everything they needed was available (namely water), their only option for survival while waiting for their prospective host countries to decide whether or not they were worthy was to venture out into the warzone, so to speak. Those militia groups were well aware of this, and presented a constant threat to them. Our rules of engagement were limited to the protection of the camp. If we were to take it upon ourselves to go rogue and get into a scrap outside of its walls, we'd probably be in jail for war crimes. Imagine the look on a 16 year old girl's face as she comes back to the camp, having been gang raped for perhaps the 10th time in a row, in an effort to provide for her younger brothers whose parents were savagely murdered in an attempt to prevent them from being conscripted as child soldiers. That shit haunts even the hardest of people. Those of us who chose to follow the rules are free today, but that freedom came at a price, and it was someone else who paid that price. Sometimes I wonder how differently I'd act when I was younger if I had the mentality I do now, after a decade of reflecting on my actions and the results of those actions. One of the many reasons I chose to leave corrections last year, and law enforcement in general, (besides the higher paycheck) is because I don't think I have enough sanity left to follow the rules anymore. If someone is a danger to society, and I don't believe the system is adequately addressing the problem, I can't promise that I'm not beyond going vigilante.

In Afghanistan, our unit actually became friends with a young boy who would sell us sweet bread and other random stuff during our frequent convoys through his village. We thought we were doing the right thing by paying him well for the service he was providing, given the substantial income gap. But nope, one day other boys got jealous of his success and murdered him in an effort to take over his business. None of the kids involved were even teenagers yet. We had to stop driving through there, because once word got out what happened I imagine there were a number of people who would have flipped and gone on a little boy hunt. Imagine the international headlines that would have triggered, and how little of the truth behind what actually happened ever would have been revealed.

Holy fuck yakherder! Staying sane in such situations must be difficult.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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22-09-2015, 12:15 PM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
(22-09-2015 11:47 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Some of the things I've seen people do make child molestation look pretty tame, and so much of it happens right under our noses but out of reach nonetheless due to rules of engagement that are, perhaps, a little too focused on the bigger picture.

One of the experiences I mentioned on a different thread was in regards to a group of militia who had set up outside of a refugee camp set up in response to the shit that was going on in Darfur, which the world refused to acknowledge as genocide due to the legal implications of labeling it as such and the responsibilities which that would incur. Nonetheless, "safe" camps were set up by the U.N. for people to take refuge in. Immigration officials from various countries set up in those camps to start interviewing people to determine whether or not they were eligible for immigration. Though they were, indeed, relatively safe from the extreme violence they had run from while within the borders of the camps, because not everything they needed was available (namely water), their only option for survival while waiting for their prospective host countries to decide whether or not they were worthy was to venture out into the warzone, so to speak. Those militia groups were well aware of this, and presented a constant threat to them. Our rules of engagement were limited to the protection of the camp. If we were to take it upon ourselves to go rogue and get into a scrap outside of its walls, we'd probably be in jail for war crimes. Imagine the look on a 16 year old girl's face as she comes back to the camp, having been gang raped for perhaps the 10th time in a row, in an effort to provide for her younger brothers whose parents were savagely murdered in an attempt to prevent them from being conscripted as child soldiers. That shit haunts even the hardest of people. Those of us who chose to follow the rules are free today, but that freedom came at a price, and it was someone else who paid that price. Sometimes I wonder how differently I'd act when I was younger if I had the mentality I do now, after a decade of reflecting on my actions and the results of those actions. One of the many reasons I chose to leave corrections last year, and law enforcement in general, (besides the higher paycheck) is because I don't think I have enough sanity left to follow the rules anymore. If someone is a danger to society, and I don't believe the system is adequately addressing the problem, I can't promise that I'm not beyond going vigilante.

In Afghanistan, our unit actually became friends with a young boy who would sell us sweet bread and other random stuff during our frequent convoys through his village. We thought we were doing the right thing by paying him well for the service he was providing, given the substantial income gap. But nope, one day other boys got jealous of his success and murdered him in an effort to take over his business. None of the kids involved were even teenagers yet. We had to stop driving through there, because once word got out what happened I imagine there were a number of people who would have flipped and gone on a little boy hunt. Imagine the international headlines that would have triggered, and how little of the truth behind what actually happened ever would have been revealed.

Exactly, and I know intimately of what you speak. The news doesn't show the full story, or the ridiculous endangerment of our men and women in uniform due to the disciplined restraint rules of engagement. I have wished many times that those who made/make up those rules would have to serve 6 months in a war zone following the rules they so unjustly put upon those who are tasked to literally restrain themselves while taking on rounds so they can get a taste, and perhaps rethink their perspective.

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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22-09-2015, 12:19 PM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
(22-09-2015 11:53 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  So much wrong in this world. I would have promoted those two US service men.

Politics suck. When we have to consider the "big picture" of potential political blowback or undermining of US/coalition efforts to put together a working and acknowledged functional government in war torn areas of the world to such a degree that they are willing to sacrifice our own soldiers as political piñatas....it sours you..truly. I understand big picture...but it sucks for those who are on the front lines.

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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22-09-2015, 12:23 PM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
(22-09-2015 12:19 PM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  
(22-09-2015 11:53 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  So much wrong in this world. I would have promoted those two US service men.

Politics suck. When we have to consider the "big picture" of potential political blowback or undermining of US/coalition efforts to put together a working and acknowledged functional government in war torn areas of the world to such a degree that they are willing to sacrifice our own soldiers as political piñatas....it sours you..truly. I understand big picture...but it sucks for those who are on the front lines.

I understand that...but, but, but Weeping

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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22-09-2015, 12:35 PM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
(22-09-2015 12:23 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  
(22-09-2015 12:19 PM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  Politics suck. When we have to consider the "big picture" of potential political blowback or undermining of US/coalition efforts to put together a working and acknowledged functional government in war torn areas of the world to such a degree that they are willing to sacrifice our own soldiers as political piñatas....it sours you..truly. I understand big picture...but it sucks for those who are on the front lines.

I understand that...but, but, but Weeping

yeah I know..... Huh

Having to have had to deal with "disciplined restraint" I can tell you it fucking sucks. It may make sense "big picture wise" but that is a horrible situation to put our men and women into. Yes, I know we "volunteered"...but we didn't volunteer to be sacrificial lambs for the political agenda of pansy ass politicians who have little if any clue about combat...but we all know politicians have made their careers over tying the hands of the military when they send them into harms way...easy to do sitting in their comfy executive chair in Washington.....while second guessing every move you took, every act you committed, and every decision you made...Monday morning quarterbacking at its worse. Just the reality of the world we live in.

"Belief is so often the death of reason" - Qyburn, Game of Thrones

"The Christian community continues to exist because the conclusions of the critical study of the Bible are largely withheld from them." -Hans Conzelmann (1915-1989)
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22-09-2015, 05:56 PM
RE: Muslim culture of Bachi bazi...the accepted sexual assault of little boys
How do you not walk away from that without ptsd? Considering what you have observed alone, and then having to hold back your indignation for the sake of international laws. Man I fucking hate islam!

(22-08-2015 07:30 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  It is by will alone I set my brows in motion it is by the conditioner of avocado that the brows acquire volume the skin acquires spots the spots become a warning. It is by will alone I set my brows in motion.
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