My Africa blog
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08-03-2015, 04:58 PM
RE: My Africa blog
Here is the 18th blog. I describe how I excavated some hominin material (no pics, though), how I took part in a sexy calendar shoot, and how I witnessed a herd of modern day dinosaurs.

https://anapeinafrica.wordpress.com/2015...3-77-7814/
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16-03-2015, 01:39 PM
RE: My Africa blog
The 19th blog. I actually had to split this off from a much longer post. I describe more hom fossil finds and the closing of the dig sites. The other half of the original post will be up in a day or two.

https://anapeinafrica.wordpress.com/2015...24-and-25/
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16-03-2015, 02:29 PM
RE: My Africa blog
Interesting reading Smile I'll be catching up.. You ever pass through Joburg / Wits university? I know some of the paleo guys there...

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(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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16-03-2015, 04:11 PM
RE: My Africa blog
(16-03-2015 02:29 PM)morondog Wrote:  Interesting reading Smile I'll be catching up.. You ever pass through Joburg / Wits university? I know some of the paleo guys there...

Thanks. No, I was in East Africa for the entirety of my stay.
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17-03-2015, 09:37 AM
RE: My Africa blog
The 20th blog. This one diverts from the normal field school stuff because I got permission from the head of antiquities to interview Maasai elders about their primate folklore. Everyone else was stuck back at camp washing fossils. That evening we all took a trip to go see some centuries old Maasai rock art.

https://anapeinafrica.wordpress.com/2015...-28-71314/

I only have one or two entries left before I'm finished.
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17-03-2015, 11:16 AM
RE: My Africa blog
You are lucky to be going on these trips. There is nothing like immersing yourself in a totally different culture. One's understanding of people changes a lot. Thumbsup

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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17-03-2015, 11:27 AM
RE: My Africa blog
(17-03-2015 11:16 AM)Dom Wrote:  You are lucky to be going on these trips. There is nothing like immersing yourself in a totally different culture. One's understanding of people changes a lot. Thumbsup

It was a once in a lifetime opportunity. I'll never forget the people I met and the things I did while there. I worked hard to get accepted into the paleoanthropology program and even harder to win the scholarship. Despite this, I still have to thank TTA for helping raise funds that ultimately paid for some of my vaccinations.
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14-06-2015, 09:28 AM
RE: My Africa blog
It was a year ago today that I flew out of the US on my way to Tanzania. This trip was a much-needed injection of life. I am no longer a shut-in. Interacting with awesome people made me want to become a social animal again. I now have local friends, a beautiful girlfriend, and an awesome new job.

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20-09-2015, 08:12 PM
RE: My Africa blog
The second dig season for the Olduvai Gorge Paleoanthropological Field School was this past June through July. I unfortunately couldn't participate again as it was just way too costly (the field school tuition, airfare, vaccinations, and supplies amounted to roughly $8,000 last time). However, I was recently surprised to learn that I probably wouldn't have wanted to go this time around anyway. A secret source close to the organizers told my field school friend that, out of the 6 or 7 students who went, all but two were sent home early for one stupid reason or another.

One girl apparently had a panic attack upon reaching Arusha, the location of the hotel where I had stayed prior to heading out to the field. She left on a flight the next day. One guy was a devout vegan and refused to eat the food cooked for him in the field. Several other people left because of supposed food poisoning. I'm going to assume that it was just spoiled American tummies clashing with the local cuisine, not food poisoning. I know I had problems that I dealt with with heavy doses of Pepto-Bismol and "manning the fuck up".

I'm honestly surprised that this year’s field school students were such bitches. With the acceptation of one girl, the people in my group were troopers who braved harsh conditions just for the chance to dig for fossils in the cradle of mankind. This makes me quite proud of what we accomplished while in-country. After all, we found three pieces of hominin material. This obviously pales in comparison to the recent cache of nearly complete fossil skeletons found in South Africa, but we didn’t have the luxury of those pieces being preserved in a cave. Our specimens were trapped in ancient stratigraphic layers (the piece I personally excavated was in a concrete type matrix).

I guess the head professor will have to be more selective about whom he picks for next year’s dig season. I jokingly told his assistant that I demand to be flown out with the unused funds (as the field school tuition was nonrefundable). I would love to dig in Tanzania again!
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04-11-2015, 09:01 PM
RE: My Africa blog
I've worked in west Africa for almost a decade now as a merchant mariner in the oilfield industry. I'm in the Luanda, Angola harbor now. Here are a few carvings that I've brought back from Nigeria and elsewhere:

[Image: 6561357653_3d102b5393_b.jpg]

This is a Fulani ceremonial axe:

[Image: 7633136810_a9c58b6ecd_c.jpg]

The bust came from SE Nigeria, the stone carvings came from Port Gentil, Gabon:

[Image: 9354621106_4fc3b6921b_c.jpg]
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