My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
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30-08-2013, 09:49 AM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
Thank god for Canadian science textbooks.

Rolleyes

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30-08-2013, 05:59 PM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
(30-08-2013 06:19 AM)devilsadvoc8 Wrote:  Could you post a scan of the page and the name of the book?

I would, but I think since my mom doesn't know I'm atheist I don't want to risk her seeing me doing it. I don't want to have to explain why I'm scanning the page that talks about religion and end up with her suspecting my lack of beliefs again. I did find a link to the chapter though. The passage is on page seven, and the book is called Conceptual Physics 10th Edition. I think the link is to the 11th edition but it says essentially the same thing. The best explanation I can come up with the book saying there isn't a contradiction and science is, as I Am said, that the author is trying to get kids that will say it contradicts their religion so it is obviously false on board with the science.
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30-08-2013, 06:26 PM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
(30-08-2013 05:59 PM)southernbelle Wrote:  ... The best explanation I can come up with the book saying there isn't a contradiction and science is, as I Am said, that the author is trying to get kids that will say it contradicts their religion so it is obviously false on board with the science.

That actually seems pretty plausible to me. It's kind of a cop out but it might be an easy way to avoid dealing with tons of stupid shit. What states use this particular text?


Also I checked the Ontario high school science curriculum. The only mention of religion was in noting that students of "certain religions" might have "sensitivities ... in areas such as the use of biological specimens" - i.e., you can't force 'em to dissect pigs. Big Grin

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30-08-2013, 06:45 PM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
(30-08-2013 06:26 PM)cjlr Wrote:  
(30-08-2013 05:59 PM)southernbelle Wrote:  ... The best explanation I can come up with the book saying there isn't a contradiction and science is, as I Am said, that the author is trying to get kids that will say it contradicts their religion so it is obviously false on board with the science.

That actually seems pretty plausible to me. It's kind of a cop out but it might be an easy way to avoid dealing with tons of stupid shit. What states use this particular text?

Well I live in Mississippi, land of the "In God We Trust" signs in every single classroom (it's state law). I don't know if every school in the state uses it for physics, but I presume there's several. It wouldn't surprise me if my teacher picked this book out himself though because his wife is a preacher
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30-08-2013, 08:06 PM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
top of page 6:
Science deals only with hypotheses that are testable. Its domain is therefore
restricted to the observable natural world. Although scientific methods can
be used to debunk various paranormal claims, they have no way of accounting
for testimonies involving the supernatural. The term supernatural literally means
“above nature.” Science works within nature, not above it. Likewise, science is
unable to answer philosophical questions, such as “What is the purpose of life?”
or religious questions, such as “What is the nature of the human spirit?” Though
these questions are valid and may have great importance to us, they rely on
subjective personal experience and do not lead to testable hypotheses. They lie
outside the realm of science."

and page 7
Science, Art, and Religion
The search for a deeper understanding of the world around us has taken
different forms, including science, art, and religion. Science is a system
by which we discover and record physical phenomena and think about possible
explanations for such phenomena. The arts are concerned with personal
interpretation and creative expression. Religion addresses the source, purpose,
and meaning of it all. Simply put, science asks how, art asks who, and religion
asks why.
Science and the arts have certain things in common. In the art of literature,
we find out about what is possible in human experience. We can learn about
emotions such as rage and love, even if we haven’t yet experienced them. The
arts describe these experiences and suggest what may be possible for us. Similarly,
a knowledge of science tells us what is possible in nature. Scientific knowledge
helps us predict possibilities in nature even before we experience them. It
provides us with a way of connecting things, of seeing relationships between and
among them, and of making sense of the great variety of natural events around
us. While art broadens our understanding of ourselves, science broadens our
understanding of our environment.
Science and religion have similarities also. For example, both are motivated
by curiosity for the natural. Both have great impact on society. Science, for
example, leads to useful technological innovations, while religion provides a
foothold for many social services. Science and religion, however, are basically
different. Science is concerned with understanding the physical universe, while
religion is concerned with spiritual matters, such as belief and faith. While scientific
truth is a matter of public scrutiny, religion is a deeply personal matter.
In these respects, science and religion are as different as apples and oranges and
do not contradict each other. Science, art, and religion can work very well
together, which is why we should never feel forced into choosing one over the
other.
That science and religion can work very well together deserves special emphasis.
When we study the nature of light later in this book, we treat light first as a
wave and then as a particle. At first, waves and particles may appear contradictory.
You might believe that light can be only one or the other, and that you
must choose between them. What scientists have discovered, however, is that
light waves and light particles complement each other, and that when these two
ideas are taken together, they provide a deeper understanding of light. In a similar
way, it is mainly people who are either uninformed or misinformed about
the deeper natures of both science and religion who feel that they must choose
between believing in religion and believing in science. Unless one has a shallow
understanding of either or both, there is no contradiction in being religious in
one’s belief system and being scientific in one’s understanding of the natural
world.*"

Looks like its a book that is really trying hard not to offend the brainwashed by distancing religion and science from each other. Maybe it is credible otherwise but its obvious bowing to religious beliefs (when it is wholly unnecessary) makes it suspect.
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31-08-2013, 02:38 AM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
It has to be a law to have a sign such as In God we Trust ? Not helluva trusting huh ? I guess they made it law to make sure it wouldn't run foul of the separation of church and state...
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31-08-2013, 03:51 AM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
Science and religion complement each other in much the same way that facts and imagination complement one another.
Our imagination lets us imagine all kinds of scenarios that could happen, then science tells us what is actually happening.

Religion gives us all kinds of crazy, inventive, imaginative stories. Then we can use science to evaluate the truth of those stories.
Religiously you are free to believe that the world was flooded up to the highest mountain top, but you would be wrong.

If you are of the mindset that wrong information complements correct & factual information, then you are just fuckin silly.

Insanity - doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results
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31-08-2013, 08:42 AM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
(31-08-2013 02:38 AM)morondog Wrote:  It has to be a law to have a sign such as In God we Trust ? Not helluva trusting huh ? I guess they made it law to make sure it wouldn't run foul of the separation of church and state...

Something about other us being founded as a godly nation and it being on our money and the national motto. I guess with it being on the money and the national motto, it'd be difficult for someone to protest. And I don't think anyone would considering how religious it is here. It was back in early 2001 that it became law, though (and I didn't know this until just a few moments ago) a few other schools (and maybe states?) after 9/11 followed Mississippi and required that the signs be in every classroom.


The exact sign I see in every classroom at my school:
[Image: In_God_We_Trust_AFA_Poster_in_New_Philad...School.jpg]
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31-08-2013, 08:57 AM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
I think I would find it irresistible to put this poster up next to it...


[Image: 031-zeus-does-not-approve.jpg]


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01-09-2013, 11:46 PM
RE: My Physics Book is Encouraging Religious Beliefs
They should have these up on the wall right next to them.

[Image: 197632-612x612-1.png]

Adopted by an Act of Congress in 1782, and the de facto motto until 1956.

E plurbis unum ~ Out of many, one

[Image: E3WvRwZ.gif]
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