My defect
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20-08-2013, 09:58 AM
My defect
A dysgraphia patient. That's who I am. It bothers me when I stayed in the classroom late as I have a longer test time. I heard people talking about it and...well... I wasn't exactly happy.
I tried to stay positive but i failed when I retested for my 6th time in my chemistry test and still failled........due to poor spelling.
I just wanted to say it out lound and clear. Thanks for whoever reading this for simplely being there.
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20-08-2013, 10:15 AM
RE: My defect
It is too bad they wouldn't let you type your test, you seem to do well with typing.

I had to look up dysgraphia as I had never heard of it. I just got a quick overview of what it is.

Sorry, that you have to struggle like this...is there assistance available to you?

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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20-08-2013, 10:28 AM
RE: My defect
Will they not allow you to type? Or someone to sit as scribe for you?
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20-08-2013, 10:34 AM
RE: My defect
I'm agreeing with Anjele.

Over here, we allow people to type their exams.

But chemistry, or anything that requires you to do diagrams, can't be done in Word, I guess.

Bummer!

The good news, though, is that there are plenty of careers where handwriting is a dead art. Mine, for example. The only handwriting I do is with on a flip-chart or white-board and that's all diagrams, arrows and capital letters.

So don't give up hope. The future is bright and powerpointy.

Smile

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21-08-2013, 02:55 AM
RE: My defect
I apllied for extra time in exams and I am still waiting for the reply. Btw I checked the dictionary before I type my lines so I hope they are correct.
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21-08-2013, 05:02 AM
RE: My defect
(21-08-2013 02:55 AM)bustead Wrote:  I apllied for extra time in exams and I am still waiting for the reply. Btw I checked the dictionary before I type my lines so I hope they are correct.

... and if they are not, how pissed off would you be if we corrected them?

Wink

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21-08-2013, 07:06 AM
RE: My defect
I can relate, I have dyscalculia.

I got through math in school by memorizing math problems the way people memorize the alphabet. Was a straight A student except for math, which took all of my attention to pass. All the rest of the subjects put together didn't take up as much time as math did.

Ironically, I am a successful business person. Once out of school, I concentrated on a sort of spacial recognition of numbers (difficult to describe), and that worked.

I still don't remember actual numbers, (at age 60), but I can eyeball rows of numbers and draw a conclusion. The numbers don't register (always have a book keeper) but the relationship remains clear in my memory. I can tell at a glance if something is profitable or not.

Over the years, the disability actually became an advantage, I work with concepts and not numbers per se.

I don't know much about your issue, but - most people with such disabilities have a way to circumvent this stuff in real life, and they are especially efficient in other ways of approaching the issue. The trouble is mostly just getting through school. That is partially because you are expected to fit your thinking into a preformed mold and apply certain lacking skills instead of being allowed to creatively integrate the affected problem solving into the way your specific brain works.

When I grew up, no one even knew about learning disabilities. You either made the grade or not. There was no help.

And today, the help focusses on making you fit the mold instead of using your brain the way it functions best.

So, your main issue is getting through your schooling. Adult life will be different, you will be able to compensate and you may excel in ways your peers cannot.

So, don't feel bad about your disability, yes it is an added mess to deal with while in school, but you won't find out what your brain is capable of doing until you can feel free to abandon the "mold" and explore your real abilities.

Meanwhile, play the game as best you can and get through school. In college, start looking at courses that allow you to circumvent the issue. And, all the time, look out for things your brain can do that others don't. These are what you will capitalize on once you are free to pursue a career. Your disability sets you apart from the rest - it often unlocks an ability that is exceptional and spells your success in life.

It's not that you have a blank spot in your brain, it's that the spot is occupied by something that usually won't fit the norm/mold.

[Image: dobie.png]

Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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21-08-2013, 07:52 AM
RE: My defect
There are laws that say that "reasonable accommodations" have to be made for those with disabilities. I would think you could push this issue, especially with a school, if all it involves is typing. Many schools now have a "diversity" officer, or advocate. I was sorry to read the way you introduced yourself. Are you really defined by this ? I somehow doubt it.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein
Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
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21-08-2013, 08:37 AM
RE: My defect
(21-08-2013 05:02 AM)DLJ Wrote:  
(21-08-2013 02:55 AM)bustead Wrote:  I apllied for extra time in exams and I am still waiting for the reply. Btw I checked the dictionary before I type my lines so I hope they are correct.

... and if they are not, how pissed off would you be if we corrected them?

Wink

Well I still can't tell the difference between motar and motor at school... I spelled them both as motor
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21-08-2013, 08:38 AM
RE: My defect
(21-08-2013 07:06 AM)Dom Wrote:  I can relate, I have dyscalculia.

I got through math in school by memorizing math problems the way people memorize the alphabet. Was a straight A student except for math, which took all of my attention to pass. All the rest of the subjects put together didn't take up as much time as math did.

Ironically, I am a successful business person. Once out of school, I concentrated on a sort of spacial recognition of numbers (difficult to describe), and that worked.

I still don't remember actual numbers, (at age 60), but I can eyeball rows of numbers and draw a conclusion. The numbers don't register (always have a book keeper) but the relationship remains clear in my memory. I can tell at a glance if something is profitable or not.

Over the years, the disability actually became an advantage, I work with concepts and not numbers per se.

I don't know much about your issue, but - most people with such disabilities have a way to circumvent this stuff in real life, and they are especially efficient in other ways of approaching the issue. The trouble is mostly just getting through school. That is partially because you are expected to fit your thinking into a preformed mold and apply certain lacking skills instead of being allowed to creatively integrate the affected problem solving into the way your specific brain works.

When I grew up, no one even knew about learning disabilities. You either made the grade or not. There was no help.

And today, the help focusses on making you fit the mold instead of using your brain the way it functions best.

So, your main issue is getting through your schooling. Adult life will be different, you will be able to compensate and you may excel in ways your peers cannot.

So, don't feel bad about your disability, yes it is an added mess to deal with while in school, but you won't find out what your brain is capable of doing until you can feel free to abandon the "mold" and explore your real abilities.

Meanwhile, play the game as best you can and get through school. In college, start looking at courses that allow you to circumvent the issue. And, all the time, look out for things your brain can do that others don't. These are what you will capitalize on once you are free to pursue a career. Your disability sets you apart from the rest - it often unlocks an ability that is exceptional and spells your success in life.

It's not that you have a blank spot in your brain, it's that the spot is occupied by something that usually won't fit the norm/mold.

Thanks for your encouragement!Smile
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