My experience of depression
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18-05-2017, 05:22 AM
RE: My experience of depression
Hello all.

Another stigma is when you need to call in sick due to depression symptoms. My sister has always used an intestinal upset as an excuse and for most of her life has kept her mental illness a secret from her co-teachers and her principals and vice-principals.

She knew that they would view her different if they knew she was in a valley of depression and just couldn't come in. And...people do look at you different if they know you have mental illness.

Just take a look at news about people who "break" and kill others; mental health issues, bi-polar, mental health concerns, unaddressed mental illness, stopped taking his medications, stopped going to therapy, etc.
"OMG, she is bi-polar! Is it safe for her to be around children?"

Plus...she can't ever just be sad. Oh no, she must be depressed... She can't ever just be giddy. Oh no, she must be manic...

"Do you think she is suicidal? Maybe we should remove all the scissors..."

And...she feels GUILTY for taking a day or two off for depression! I always tell her that nobody faults a diabetic for calling in sick or someone going through chemo. But, neither do you get much sympathy for admitting that you were experiencing depression and couldn't come to work...but you do if you had the stomach bug.

I am not really sure why there is such a stigma attached to mental illness? Is it because it seemed the most obvious of demonic influence? If so, maybe there is hope it will eventually diminish as humanity continues to climb out of the deep well of superstition.

Hugs all around.

-Jeanne

"The Ox is slow, but the Earth is patient."
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18-05-2017, 06:36 AM
RE: My experience of depression
(17-05-2017 11:57 PM)morondog Wrote:  
(17-05-2017 08:10 PM)Robvalue Wrote:  I totally agree with you that medication can be very much worth it, if not essential. I have no doubt I'd be dead now without anything to help give me the strength to fight it. I see it as the medication lifting your head above water, to give you the chance to use your strength to swim rather than just slowly drowning whatever you do.

I've never really understood the stigma behind taking drugs for mental health. If you get flu or chronic heart disease or diabetes no one looks down on you for getting pills or injections.

At least for me, there is/was a fundamental difference in feelings between taken antibiotics or pain medication, and my antidepressants.

You see; if a person has to take antibiotics for an infection, or pain meds because of an injury, there is something of an assurance there. You know there is something wrong that is out of your control.

But trying to medicate a mental illness? In a way, it feels different. There is a lack of 'tangibility' I suppose. In a way it doesn't feel 'real' like a flu does. Before anybody lectures me about it again, intellectually I know there isn't a real distinction, but it's not an intellectual reaction.

I think that is one of the reasons for the stigma; mental illness is hard to comprehend even for many sufferers; it can be difficult to wrap ones head around the idea of their mind not functioning correctly, so it's difficult to really 'get' medicating the problem you can't properly see.
There are other reasons too, of course. Like the perception of weakness it entails; a person can't control their own mind might seem weak or 'wrong'. Also there's the perception of threat; mental illness sufferers can be dangerous in the public eye, and the presence of medicating just makes them a more noticeable "threat".

That said, I could just be talking out my arse, so, grain of salt and all...

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18-05-2017, 07:44 AM
RE: My experience of depression
(18-05-2017 06:36 AM)Free Thought Wrote:  
(17-05-2017 11:57 PM)morondog Wrote:  I've never really understood the stigma behind taking drugs for mental health. If you get flu or chronic heart disease or diabetes no one looks down on you for getting pills or injections.

At least for me, there is/was a fundamental difference in feelings between taken antibiotics or pain medication, and my antidepressants.

You see; if a person has to take antibiotics for an infection, or pain meds because of an injury, there is something of an assurance there. You know there is something wrong that is out of your control.

But trying to medicate a mental illness? In a way, it feels different. There is a lack of 'tangibility' I suppose. In a way it doesn't feel 'real' like a flu does. Before anybody lectures me about it again, intellectually I know there isn't a real distinction, but it's not an intellectual reaction.

I think that is one of the reasons for the stigma; mental illness is hard to comprehend even for many sufferers; it can be difficult to wrap ones head around the idea of their mind not functioning correctly, so it's difficult to really 'get' medicating the problem you can't properly see.
There are other reasons too, of course. Like the perception of weakness it entails; a person can't control their own mind might seem weak or 'wrong'. Also there's the perception of threat; mental illness sufferers can be dangerous in the public eye, and the presence of medicating just makes them a more noticeable "threat".

That said, I could just be talking out my arse, so, grain of salt and all...

I think you make great points. I also think some people believe you can simply just change your "mood" so as not to be depressed--when in reality, depression is so much more than that. I remember Tom Cruise getting on Brooke Shields for taking an antidepressant for (if I remember correctly) postpartum depression. He made a comment like she just needs to exercise more and take vitamins or some other ridiculousness. Hobo
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18-05-2017, 07:52 AM
RE: My experience of depression
(18-05-2017 07:44 AM)jennybee Wrote:  
(18-05-2017 06:36 AM)Free Thought Wrote:  At least for me, there is/was a fundamental difference in feelings between taken antibiotics or pain medication, and my antidepressants.

You see; if a person has to take antibiotics for an infection, or pain meds because of an injury, there is something of an assurance there. You know there is something wrong that is out of your control.

But trying to medicate a mental illness? In a way, it feels different. There is a lack of 'tangibility' I suppose. In a way it doesn't feel 'real' like a flu does. Before anybody lectures me about it again, intellectually I know there isn't a real distinction, but it's not an intellectual reaction.

I think that is one of the reasons for the stigma; mental illness is hard to comprehend even for many sufferers; it can be difficult to wrap ones head around the idea of their mind not functioning correctly, so it's difficult to really 'get' medicating the problem you can't properly see.
There are other reasons too, of course. Like the perception of weakness it entails; a person can't control their own mind might seem weak or 'wrong'. Also there's the perception of threat; mental illness sufferers can be dangerous in the public eye, and the presence of medicating just makes them a more noticeable "threat".

That said, I could just be talking out my arse, so, grain of salt and all...

I think you make great points. I also think some people believe you can simply just change your "mood" so as not to be depressed--when in reality, depression is so much more than that. I remember Tom Cruise getting on Brooke Shields for taking an antidepressant for (if I remember correctly) postpartum depression. He made a comment like she just needs to exercise more and take vitamins or some other ridiculousness. Hobo
Tom Cruise is one of those Xenu berks anyway lol. He made his ex-wife give birth in silent room, as per there other craaaazy traditions.

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19-05-2017, 02:09 AM
RE: My experience of depression
(18-05-2017 04:41 AM)adey67 Wrote:  I've only just found this, I'm sorry you feel so bad Ladyday you're always welcome to PM me if you want to chat. Hug

Thank you dear. I'll keep that in mind. Sometimes, when boyfriend and everybody else are at work, it can be hard to find somebody to talk to Smile And you live in a good time zones Big Grin

(18-05-2017 05:22 AM)Jeanne Wrote:  I am not really sure why there is such a stigma attached to mental illness? Is it because it seemed the most obvious of demonic influence? If so, maybe there is hope it will eventually diminish as humanity continues to climb out of the deep well of superstition.

I think a lot of it boils down to how little we know, and have known in the past, about the brain. Before we knew about neurotransmitters etc. all that was known was that it was people who acted strange, for no measurable reason. Even to this day we know very little about how mental diseases work. But at least we can see from brain scans, measurements of brain chemistry and such that there IS a good, physical reason for the "strange behaviors".
Humans are scared of things they don't understand. The dark seems threatening. Here be dragons.

You are very right about the calling in about depression. I've never dared to give that as the reason either. I've always just said that I'm sick, without elaborating further. But that also makes them very suspicious when you're sick a lot!

"I believe that while not all people are essentially good, most are trying" - Adam Savage
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19-05-2017, 03:10 AM
RE: My experience of depression
(18-05-2017 06:36 AM)Free Thought Wrote:  
(17-05-2017 11:57 PM)morondog Wrote:  I've never really understood the stigma behind taking drugs for mental health. If you get flu or chronic heart disease or diabetes no one looks down on you for getting pills or injections.

At least for me, there is/was a fundamental difference in feelings between taken antibiotics or pain medication, and my antidepressants.

You see; if a person has to take antibiotics for an infection, or pain meds because of an injury, there is something of an assurance there. You know there is something wrong that is out of your control.

But trying to medicate a mental illness? In a way, it feels different. There is a lack of 'tangibility' I suppose. In a way it doesn't feel 'real' like a flu does. Before anybody lectures me about it again, intellectually I know there isn't a real distinction, but it's not an intellectual reaction.

I think that is one of the reasons for the stigma; mental illness is hard to comprehend even for many sufferers; it can be difficult to wrap ones head around the idea of their mind not functioning correctly, so it's difficult to really 'get' medicating the problem you can't properly see.
There are other reasons too, of course. Like the perception of weakness it entails; a person can't control their own mind might seem weak or 'wrong'. Also there's the perception of threat; mental illness sufferers can be dangerous in the public eye, and the presence of medicating just makes them a more noticeable "threat".

That said, I could just be talking out my arse, so, grain of salt and all...

You mentioned a point I was about to bring up. Depression is an invisible illness. You don't get a big cast, you don't have stuff coming out of your nose, nor are you doubled over in terrible physical pain. Your body appears normal upon any kind of inspection (except quite possibly a scan of your brain).

People are much less sympathetic and understanding about these invisible illnesses. It's also harder to accept them in yourself. How lucky am I, that I also have another one (M.E.) which many people either think I'm totally faking, or dismiss as just "tiredness". At least I get some pain with my Crohn's disease, and it easily shows up upon bowel investigation.

Sorry about the pity party! Anyhow, anyone is welcome to message me anytime. I know all about depression. I've been as close as it's possible to go and still be alive. Also about anxiety. I've been so paralyzed by it before I've been unable to even open my post or take my tablets.

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19-05-2017, 03:57 AM
RE: My experience of depression
(19-05-2017 03:10 AM)Robvalue Wrote:  You mentioned a point I was about to bring up. Depression is an invisible illness. You don't get a big cast, you don't have stuff coming out of your nose, nor are you doubled over in terrible physical pain. Your body appears normal upon any kind of inspection (except quite possibly a scan of your brain).

People are much less sympathetic and understanding about these invisible illnesses. It's also harder to accept them in yourself. How lucky am I, that I also have another one (M.E.) which many people either think I'm totally faking, or dismiss as just "tiredness". At least I get some pain with my Crohn's disease, and it easily shows up upon bowel investigation.

Sorry about the pity party! Anyhow, anyone is welcome to message me anytime. I know all about depression. I've been as close as it's possible to go and still be alive. Also about anxiety. I've been so paralyzed by it before I've been unable to even open my post or take my tablets.

You seem to have done a good job trying to get every disease out there. Sorry you've been hit so hard. I hope it can be managed well.

"I believe that while not all people are essentially good, most are trying" - Adam Savage
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19-05-2017, 05:30 AM
RE: My experience of depression
Big hugs to Robvalue. And...hugs all around just because.

"The Ox is slow, but the Earth is patient."
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19-05-2017, 08:32 AM
RE: My experience of depression
I agree with the others- Hug hugs for you, Robvalue.
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19-05-2017, 09:59 AM (This post was last modified: 19-05-2017 10:08 AM by GirlyMan.)
RE: My experience of depression
(17-05-2017 08:10 PM)Robvalue Wrote:  I've had M.E. for some 11 years now, and the depression for just as long.

You got inflammation of the brain and spinal cord? Inflammation of the brain seems to lead to amyloid plaque buildup which seems to lead to Alzheimer's. Curcumin is one of the more potent anti-inflammatories, better than many drugs. I'd be megadosing it. Hell, I don't have CNS inflammation and I megadose it anyway for prophylactic purposes.

#sigh
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