Need advice on the future
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06-06-2014, 09:18 AM
RE: Need advice on the future
(06-06-2014 09:17 AM)RobbyPants Wrote:  That being said, Chas is right: make sure you find something you want to do.

I would like to add to that:

but be prepared to do a lot of crappy stuff before you get to do what you want to do.

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06-06-2014, 09:28 AM
RE: Need advice on the future
(06-06-2014 08:10 AM)Tatuks Wrote:  Studying a language in community college or in school is a waste of time in my opinion. If you really get into learning a language you can easily learn it by yourself by using programs and speaking with natives. Here are some useful links:

http://www.duolingo.com (I strongly recommend, it's free and possibly the best language learnin tool in teh interwebs. You get a huge amount of repetition and start to remember words like magic, compared to school for example where you get a couple of repetitions per hour)

http://www.fluentin3months.com (This dude claims you can be fluent in language in just 3 months, good reading)

http://www.ankisrs.net (Flash card program)


There's also memrise.com It used to be absolutely fantastic but then they butchered the website. I went off and tried using anki but it just wasn't as good. But then memrise brought out a smart phone app which is just fantastic. I'm planning on buying a tablet just so I can use memrise.

duolingo is good as well although last time I looked they were trying to make it so that you learn words as well as grammar and I don't want to use it for that. You just don't learn enough words from it to make it worthwhile. It should play to its strengths.
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06-06-2014, 09:31 AM
RE: Need advice on the future
(06-06-2014 09:28 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  
(06-06-2014 08:10 AM)Tatuks Wrote:  Studying a language in community college or in school is a waste of time in my opinion. If you really get into learning a language you can easily learn it by yourself by using programs and speaking with natives. Here are some useful links:

http://www.duolingo.com (I strongly recommend, it's free and possibly the best language learnin tool in teh interwebs. You get a huge amount of repetition and start to remember words like magic, compared to school for example where you get a couple of repetitions per hour)

http://www.fluentin3months.com (This dude claims you can be fluent in language in just 3 months, good reading)

http://www.ankisrs.net (Flash card program)


There's also memrise.com It used to be absolutely fantastic but then they butchered the website. I went off and tried using anki but it just wasn't as good. But then memrise brought out a smart phone app which is just fantastic. I'm planning on buying a tablet just so I can use memrise.

duolingo is good as well although last time I looked they were trying to make it so that you learn words as well as grammar and I don't want to use it for that. You just don't learn enough words from it to make it worthwhile. It should play to its strengths.

Duolingo has nowadays an excercise in which you can only learn words which you have seen in lessons you have done. Also doing the translations in Immersion section gets a boatload of words into your vocabulary.

Thanks for the tip on Memrise, I have to say Anki isn't THAT good Big Grin
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06-06-2014, 11:05 AM
RE: Need advice on the future
I never considered software engineering to be a field in which it was easy to get promotion. At first it is, you start as a junior programmer and then quickly become a senior developer. Then there's team leader where you lead about 4 or 5 people and eventually you make it to technical lead or system architect. But then where? Most programming teams aren't actually that large because even the largest enterprise scale system can, and should, be broken into separate subsystems. I've worked in a huge variety of different companies, from start-ups to billion Euro projects and I've never worked in a team or department that had more than about 15 people in it.

The other thing is that you develop technical skills that are always in demand which means that's where the work is. I've been trying to get out of software engineering for years now but I keep getting drawn back to it because that's where the opportunities are.

Many people move out of programming by becoming managers but then that's not Computer science or Software engineering any more. My brother is now a team leader after 17 years at a single company and he finds it incredibly stressful because he has to rely on other people to do work by a certain point in time. Although admittedly in his case the company isn't hiring the staff it needs to get the work done and customers are getting annoyed because they can't make their targets.

Programming requires a certain mindset. If you're the kind of person who likes to be left alone to sort out logical problems or who wants to create something from nothing starting with nothing but a blank canvas, and if you can sit in a quiet office for 8 hours a day without any need to talk to anyone else then programming may well be for you.
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