New book: Zoobiquity
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27-08-2012, 12:37 PM (This post was last modified: 27-08-2012 01:52 PM by ghostexorcist.)
New book: Zoobiquity
Yesterday morning, I turned on the radio to listen to some music on the drive home from work. Unfortunately it was Sunday, which meant it was time for religious and healthcare talk shows. I was getting ready to turn it off when the host of one show said: “Coming up next…we’ll find out how humans and animals are more similar than you think.” I thought maybe they were going to talk about evolution or something, so I continued to listen. The guest was a UCLA heart specialist who co-authored a book entitled Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us about Health and the Science of Healing (2012). She explained in the interview how animals suffer from everything from depression and cancer to STDs and suicide just like humans do. She mentioned that this should not be surprising as all life on earth shares a common ancestor and evolved over millions of years to the countless species that we have today (this definitely gave her credibility in my eyes). She stated the point of her book is to get human and animal healthcare experts to come together to improve medical care for both. A prime example she gives for this is the fact that veterinarians have known about certain diseases and disorders in animals for decades that are now just being discovered in humans. If the two fields were to combine their knowledge, it would revolutionize the science of medicine in general. She shows a lot of humility in pointing out that human physicians have looked down on vets for far too long. You can see an interview with her on ABC here.

Chimps are obviously studied because they are our closest genetic cousins. Their anatomy is nearly identical to ours. But people also forget how closely related we are to other animals. I believe books like this are further proof of the interrelatedness of all life on earth. Imagine the mental gymnastics that it would take for creationists to explain away why god would give animals the same ailments as humans. Seriously, what purpose would breast cancer in a mountain lioness or manic self-mutilation in an octopus serve in the grand scheme of things? I’ve ordered a copy so I can learn more about the fascinating parellels between humans and animals.

There are a few half-hour to hour-long lectures on zoobiquity on youtube. Here is one on OCD and anxiety in humans and dogs. Here is one on heart disease in humans and animals. Here is one on various diseases.
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27-08-2012, 02:06 PM
RE: New book: Zoobiquity
(27-08-2012 12:37 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  Yesterday morning, I turned on the radio to listen to some music on the drive home from work. Unfortunately it was Sunday, which meant it was time for religious and healthcare talk shows. I was getting ready to turn it off when the host of one show said: “Coming up next…we’ll find out how humans and animals are more similar than you think.” I thought maybe they were going to talk about evolution or something, so I continued to listen. The guest was a UCLA heart specialist who co-authored a book entitled Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us about Health and the Science of Healing (2012). She explained in the interview how animals suffer from everything from depression and cancer to STDs and suicide just like humans do. She mentioned that this should not be surprising as all life on earth shares a common ancestor and evolved over millions of years to the countless species that we have today (this definitely gave her credibility in my eyes). She stated the point of her book is to get human and animal healthcare experts to come together to improve medical care for both. A prime example she gives for this is the fact that veterinarians have known about certain diseases and disorders in animals for decades that are now just being discovered in humans. If the two fields were to combine their knowledge, it would revolutionize the science of medicine in general. She shows a lot of humility in pointing out that human physicians have looked down on vets for far too long. You can see an interview with her on ABC here.

Chimps are obviously studied because they are our closest genetic cousins. Their anatomy is nearly identical to ours. But people also forget how closely related we are to other animals. I believe books like this are further proof of the interrelatedness of all life on earth. Imagine the mental gymnastics that it would take for creationists to explain away why god would give animals the same ailments as humans. Seriously, what purpose would breast cancer in a mountain lioness or manic self-mutilation in an octopus serve in the grand scheme of things? I’ve ordered a copy so I can learn more about the fascinating parellels between humans and animals.

There are a few half-hour to hour-long lectures on zoobiquity on youtube. Here is one on OCD and anxiety in humans and dogs. Here is one on heart disease in humans and animals. Here is one on various diseases.

Thanks, but I was hoping for a great story about creationists calling in.Thumbsup

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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27-08-2012, 02:42 PM
RE: New book: Zoobiquity
(27-08-2012 02:06 PM)Chas Wrote:  Thanks, but I was hoping for a great story about creationists calling in.Thumbsup

This was like 6:30 am, and I'm sure talk of medicine and various disorders would have been over the head of the average creationist. I'm surprised that there wasn't some kind of phone activity when the UCLA cardiologist said: "humans are animals, too." If anyone called in, I'm sure there would have been lots of drooling and snarling, but no real argument.
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28-08-2012, 03:11 PM
RE: New book: Zoobiquity
I will post interesting facts as I come across them. The first chapter discusses why humans, animals, and insects faint. Fainting is usually caused by the heart beat slowing and not delivering enough blood to the brain. The overall phenomenon is usually brought on by some type of emotional stressor. Animals faint when faced with the threat of a predator. Fainting gives an animal the appearance of being dead, which means a predator will pass over them in favor of their more active counterparts. Near-fainting also serves a purpose in the animal kingdom. For instance, a baby deer will slow its heart beat in order to keep its body still. This means they will be less likely to be seen by a predator. Human babies have been shown to do this, too. The author gives an example of the heart beats of unborn babies dropping to half their normal rates during missile attacks on an Israeli hospital. Their heartbeats returned to normal levels after two minutes. The human versions of fainting and near-fainting are just carryovers from our pre-human lineage. It is ultimately linked to our distant fish ancestors. Fish can also faint. This serves the purpose of dropping the electrical impulses that predators like sharks pick up on.
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28-08-2012, 03:18 PM (This post was last modified: 28-08-2012 05:08 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: New book: Zoobiquity
I can just see it now. Bucky, spider in hand,
"Dr. Barb, I think my spider has fainting spells, can you help us".
Thwap.

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Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
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28-08-2012, 09:37 PM
RE: New book: Zoobiquity
Chapter 2

* Dinosaurs got brain and bone cancer like mammals.
* In a competition between small species like bumblebee bats and large species like blue whales, larger species tend to have lower occurrences of cancer than smaller species (reason unknown).
* However, larger specimens within a species—e.g., tall humans and big dogs—tend to get more cancer than their normal-sized counterparts.
* Dogs and Jaguars with breast cancer have the same mutated BRCA1 gene that causes breast cancer in human women.
* “Professional lactators” like cows and goats have an almost non-existence occurrence of breast cancer (this parallels studies in human mothers who breast feed).
* Sea animals from turtles to dolphins are susceptible to the same sexually transmitted virus-induced cancers that humans get.
* Human cancer cells have been used to successfully fool the immune systems of dogs into attacking its own cancer cells. This treatment was released for veterinarian use in 2009 (after nearly 10 years of research).
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