News from a friend
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10-09-2012, 02:56 PM
RE: News from a friend
(10-09-2012 12:09 PM)Bishadi Wrote:  which subject should i open my next thread on?

How about, "Silence is golden"?

Religious disputes are like arguments in a madhouse over which inmate really is Napoleon.
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10-09-2012, 04:32 PM
RE: News from a friend
(10-09-2012 11:40 AM)Logisch Wrote:  Those are things I don't know, and I'm not even sure if the tech is available to him to know or ask or understand those questions. But "quantum computing" has been talked about a good bit last year and this year. If it was something they were developing to sell I'm not sure if they'd even share that info with anyone willingly lol.

I'm interested in how it works though, I hope more info comes out on it because it is really interesting stuff.

sorry, i didnt see this post. too many spammer on this forum and few like you that are actually capable of inquiring, versus being a know it all.

this will give you an idea.


just google for the source, i am 2 lazy



Defining the Quantum Computer

The Turing machine, developed by Alan Turing in the 1930s, is a theoretical device that consists of tape of unlimited length that is divided into little squares. Each square can either hold a symbol (1 or 0) or be left blank. A read-write device reads these symbols and blanks, which gives the machine its instructions to perform a certain program. Does this sound familiar? Well, in a quantum Turing machine, the difference is that the tape exists in a quantum state, as does the read-write head. This means that the symbols on the tape can be either 0 or 1 or a superposition of 0 and 1; in other words the symbols are both 0 and 1 (and all points in between) at the same time. While a normal Turing machine can only perform one calculation at a time, a quantum Turing machine can perform many calculations at once.

Today's computers, like a Turing machine, work by manipulating bits that exist in one of two states: a 0 or a 1. Quantum computers aren't limited to two states; they encode information as quantum bits, or qubits, which can exist in superposition. Qubits represent atoms, ions, photons or electrons and their respective control devices that are working together to act as computer memory and a processor. Because a quantum computer can contain these multiple states simultaneously, it has the potential to be millions of times more powerful than today's most powerful supercomputers.

This superposition of qubits is what gives quantum computers their inherent parallelism. According to physicist David Deutsch, this parallelism allows a quantum computer to work on a million computations at once, while your desktop PC works on one. A 30-qubit quantum computer would equal the processing power of a conventional computer that could run at 10 teraflops (trillions of floating-point operations per second). Today's typical desktop computers run at speeds measured in gigaflops (billions of floating-point operations per second).

Quantum computers also utilize another aspect of quantum mechanics known as entanglement. One problem with the idea of quantum computers is that if you try to look at the subatomic particles, you could bump them, and thereby change their value. If you look at a qubit in superposition to determine its value, the qubit will assume the value of either 0 or 1, but not both (effectively turning your spiffy quantum computer into a mundane digital computer). To make a practical quantum computer, scientists have to devise ways of making measurements indirectly to preserve the system's integrity. Entanglement provides a potential answer. In quantum physics, if you apply an outside force to two atoms, it can cause them to become entangled, and the second atom can take on the properties of the first atom. So if left alone, an atom will spin in all directions. The instant it is disturbed it chooses one spin, or one value; and at the same time, the second entangled atom will choose an opposite spin, or value. This allows scientists to know the value of the qubits without actually looking at them.

Next, we'll look at some recent advancements in the field of quantum computing
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10-09-2012, 06:55 PM
RE: News from a friend
bishadi all of your posts tl;dr

When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That's relativity.

You cannot successfully determine beforehand which side of the bread to butter.
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10-09-2012, 07:13 PM
RE: News from a friend
Actually i find it interesting because i like computers.
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10-09-2012, 07:16 PM
RE: News from a friend
yeah but this is old. last time I checked they were making qbits inside of diamonds.

When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That's relativity.

You cannot successfully determine beforehand which side of the bread to butter.
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10-09-2012, 07:27 PM
RE: News from a friend
Quantum computing has limited applications anyway. It's really good for things like bruteforcing the password to someone's bank account or solving the Traveling Salesman problem, but it's not really much faster than current computers at other things. Optical computing is much more promising. We'll probably see quantum-based add-in cards or co-processors in a decade or so, then after that we might see on-die quantum processors alongside traditional logic cores, FPUs, and memory with optical interconnects using silicene technology.

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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11-09-2012, 05:49 AM
RE: News from a friend
(10-09-2012 07:16 PM)Xinoftruden Wrote:  yeah but this is old. last time I checked they were making qbits inside of diamonds.

you cant even spell it, let alone observe the entanglement

at room temp
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11-09-2012, 05:51 AM
This guy really has no idea what he is talking about
(10-09-2012 07:27 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  Quantum computing has limited applications anyway. It's really good for things like bruteforcing the password to someone's bank account or solving the Traveling Salesman problem, but it's not really much faster than current computers at other things. Optical computing is much more promising.


need anyone point out the stupid in that above?


Quote:We'll probably see quantum-based add-in cards or co-processors in a decade or so, then after that we might see on-die quantum processors alongside traditional logic cores, FPUs, and memory with optical interconnects using silicene technology.


someone compare the logic of qc and traditional for this idiot so he dont continue posting 'stupid'
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