Nietzsche And The Death of God
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30-06-2016, 02:30 AM
Nietzsche And The Death of God
I have a quick question for all of those who have read at least a sliver of Nietzsche and know the Parable of the Madman.

Do you believe that people could behave rationally in the face of the death of a God, if such an event were to occur? Give it a go!
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30-06-2016, 02:49 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
There's a reason why he was called a madman. Yes




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30-06-2016, 11:56 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
No more or less rationally than they do believing their reality and demise goes on with a god.

Maybe bucket list adventures would be more willingly done. Idk, is it rational to skydive at 94?

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30-06-2016, 11:59 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
We all got along fine after Darth Vader bit the dust....

I'm betting one more fictional character croaking won't upset us too much...

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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07-07-2016, 12:07 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(30-06-2016 11:59 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  We all got along fine after Darth Vader bit the dust....

I'm betting one more fictional character croaking won't upset us too much...

However... like with Darth Vader... there will always be another to take his/her place.
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07-07-2016, 12:50 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(30-06-2016 02:30 AM)SunButt Wrote:  I have a quick question for all of those who have read at least a sliver of Nietzsche and know the Parable of the Madman.

Do you believe that people could behave rationally in the face of the death of a God, if such an event were to occur? Give it a go!

I've read all his works. As a non believer his idea was simply that, an idea. I interpreted it as in god was an out of date concept. I agreed.

What have you read? I am simply curious.

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I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
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07-07-2016, 02:47 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
About as useful as pondering Gandalf's death.
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12-07-2016, 05:48 AM (This post was last modified: 12-07-2016 05:52 AM by Dworkin.)
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
Hi,

In 'The Rebel', Albert Camus considers a closely related idea. Interestingly, he notes that atheism seen as rebellion actually affirms that which it denies.

On the same theme, the 'death' of God affirms that there was something there to die. This of course is Nietzsche's famously whimsical humour. He just means the death of a mistaken idea.

But, the atheist cannot be a rebel, for the reason stated above. If you rebel, you rebel against something, usually in the hope of change. This cannot be the atheist position. A world without God is just a brute fact, like the weather. There can be no rebelling, or pleading, against nothing.

Some find such a view of atheism a bit harsh, but IMHO it may be harsher to be rebelling or pleading to purposefully deaf ears. N. was obviously aware of this, but the 'death of God' has been very slow in coming.

D.
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12-07-2016, 10:57 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
If something that didn't exist to begin with, the "death" of it would not even be noticed. I think that Nietzsche was trying to make that point.

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
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12-07-2016, 11:44 AM (This post was last modified: 12-07-2016 12:01 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(12-07-2016 05:48 AM)Dworkin Wrote:  Hi,

In 'The Rebel', Albert Camus considers a closely related idea.

Hegel too: "The pure concept, however, or infinity, as the abyss of nothingness in which all being sinks, must characterize the infinite pain, which previously was only in culture historically and as the feeling on which rests modern religion, the feeling that God Himself is dead."

Since it is a parable, Nietszche didn't literally mean that God existed and then died. I think what he meant is the morality required by the God of Christianity is dead and we are no longer either bound or informed or directed by it. I think he develops this concept even further in Beyond Good and Evil and we have or will become (since he notes in the parable that the announcement of the event is premature) the Übermensch, our own God. That's one read anyway.

(12-07-2016 10:57 AM)The Organic Chemist Wrote:  If something that didn't exist to begin with, the "death" of it would not even be noticed. I think that Nietzsche was trying to make that point.

That's interesting but I think Nietzsche's point was something deeper than that.

#sigh
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