Nietzsche And The Death of God
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12-07-2016, 12:37 PM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
I think that there are people for whom the threat of damnation behind religious/moral rules is necessary--or at least they feel it to be so. As with some alcoholics, maybe for these people, there's no safe level of indulgence. I speculate that for a few, becoming convinced that there is no God or that God is dead would give rise to some kind of frenzy, at least until they realized that there would still be bad consequences for murder, rape, etc.
I doubt that the number of people so affected by the death of God would be as high as Nietzsche seems to think, though.
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12-07-2016, 01:37 PM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(30-06-2016 02:30 AM)SunButt Wrote:  I have a quick question for all of those who have read at least a sliver of Nietzsche and know the Parable of the Madman.

Do you believe that people could behave rationally in the face of the death of a God, if such an event were to occur? Give it a go!

They already do. In 2016, the 3 letter meme pronounced "gawd" no longer means what it did 100 years ago. That idea *IS* dead.

You think people behave rationally now ?
Facepalm

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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12-07-2016, 03:09 PM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(12-07-2016 11:44 AM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(12-07-2016 10:57 AM)The Organic Chemist Wrote:  If something that didn't exist to begin with, the "death" of it would not even be noticed. I think that Nietzsche was trying to make that point.

That's interesting but I think Nietzsche's point was something deeper than that.

I agree. I was merely making the simple connection that if there was no god to begin with, there is nothing to die and therefore nothing to notice.

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
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12-07-2016, 04:08 PM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(12-07-2016 03:09 PM)The Organic Chemist Wrote:  
(12-07-2016 11:44 AM)GirlyMan Wrote:  That's interesting but I think Nietzsche's point was something deeper than that.

I agree. I was merely making the simple connection that if there was no god to begin with, there is nothing to die and therefore nothing to notice.

There is that aspect too. God is an invention of man, an artifact designed to guide which no longer has a compass. Soon we will remember God as we remember a sextant.

There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
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12-07-2016, 09:34 PM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(12-07-2016 12:37 PM)julep Wrote:  I doubt that the number of people so affected by the death of God would be as high as Nietzsche seems to think, though.

I don't recall him implying any such thing. Do you have a reference I may have forgotten?

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12-07-2016, 10:21 PM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
In another 19th century European writers phrasing... "If there is no God, Everything is permissible" Dostoyevsky was seemingly sure that society and mankind wouldn't be able to rationally handle the world of no god.

You can get the roll of the dice where you view the idea negatively or where it's an empowering thought.... or just accept it's reality as a simple generic factor.

Some particular theists even have mentioned here considering the ramifications of the world with no meaning or control in their youths made them turn to becoming more religious.

"Allow there to be a spectrum in all that you see" - Neil Degrasse Tyson
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12-07-2016, 10:33 PM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(12-07-2016 10:21 PM)ClydeLee Wrote:  In another 19th century European writers phrasing... "If there is no God, Everything is permissible" Dostoyevsky was seemingly sure that society and mankind wouldn't be able to rationally handle the world of no god.

You can get the roll of the dice where you view the idea negatively or where it's an empowering thought.... or just accept it's reality as a simple generic factor.

Some particular theists even have mentioned here considering the ramifications of the world with no meaning or control in their youths made them turn to becoming more religious.

Are you quoting The brothers Karamazov? I've not read it in must be 30 years. If so, which character?

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13-07-2016, 12:49 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(12-07-2016 10:33 PM)Banjo Wrote:  Are you quoting The brothers Karamazov? I've not read it in must be 30 years. If so, which character?

I believe he is. And words were said by Ivan Karamazov.

There is also article that address problem of Dostoevsky really writing this - http://infidels.org/library/modern/andre...evsky.html

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
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13-07-2016, 12:56 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(13-07-2016 12:49 AM)Szuchow Wrote:  
(12-07-2016 10:33 PM)Banjo Wrote:  Are you quoting The brothers Karamazov? I've not read it in must be 30 years. If so, which character?

I believe he is. And words were said by Ivan Karamazov.

There is also article that address problem of Dostoevsky really writing this - http://infidels.org/library/modern/andre...evsky.html

Thanks mate. That was an interesting read.

That was said during that long conversation between the brothers if I recall....

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13-07-2016, 01:08 AM
RE: Nietzsche And The Death of God
(13-07-2016 12:56 AM)Banjo Wrote:  Thanks mate. That was an interesting read.

No problem.

(13-07-2016 12:56 AM)Banjo Wrote:  That was said during that long conversation between the brothers if I recall....

Don't know, as I didn't read it yet. I'm waiting for Oleg Pavlov Tales from Last Days which was favorably reviewed in one of few polish magazines that I still read.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
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