Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
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16-03-2010, 07:07 AM
 
Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
"If God wants worshippers and is powerful enough to create entire universes then there would be no atheists." - YouTube user SouthWind505

Here's the video they commented on:

Nonbelief 2.0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-dq2wxJIdM&feature=sub

James (DasAmericanAtheist) puts logic behind the existence of god (or lack thereof)...

What do you think about the statement above? I tend to agree.
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16-03-2010, 08:20 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
(16-03-2010 07:07 AM)supermanlives1973 Wrote:  "If God wants worshippers and is powerful enough to create entire universes then there would be no atheists."

Sounds very similar (at least logistically) to the Epicurus quote (the one I've used for my signature, conveniently) that questions God's power and the existence of evil.

It tend to take logical fallacies like this to be proof enough that there is no god, it's hard to believe a perfect, all loving being would make such a messed up world.

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16-03-2010, 10:18 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
(16-03-2010 08:20 AM)Green Wrote:  
(16-03-2010 07:07 AM)supermanlives1973 Wrote:  "If God wants worshippers and is powerful enough to create entire universes then there would be no atheists."

Sounds very similar (at least logistically) to the Epicurus quote (the one I've used for my signature, conveniently) that questions God's power and the existence of evil.

It tend to take logical fallacies like this to be proof enough that there is no god, it's hard to believe a perfect, all loving being would make such a messed up world.

You stole mt sig Sad

Ah, well. I stole it from Epicurus anyway. There are many logic questions for god, and I believe the typical rebuttal for that one it something along the lines of free will, your choice to burn in hell, blah blah blah.

I don't like logical question like, or bible quotations, because they are too easy to get out of. I prefer to cut to the chase. No evidence for god, means no reason to believe in god.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8gsIuEvE...re=related
Ricky Gervais made that point, at 1:55.

I don't believe Jesus is the son of God until I see the long form birth certificate!
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16-03-2010, 10:31 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
(16-03-2010 08:20 AM)Green Wrote:  
(16-03-2010 07:07 AM)supermanlives1973 Wrote:  "If God wants worshippers and is powerful enough to create entire universes then there would be no atheists."

Sounds very similar (at least logistically) to the Epicurus quote (the one I've used for my signature, conveniently) that questions God's power and the existence of evil.

You're going to have to fight ashley.hunt60 for rights to that sig. Big Grin

"Owl," said Rabbit shortly, "you and I have brains. The others have fluff. If there is any thinking to be done in this Forest - and when I say thinking I mean thinking - you and I must do it."
- A. A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner
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16-03-2010, 11:03 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
(16-03-2010 10:18 AM)ashley.hunt60 Wrote:  You stole mt sig Sad.

So I did! Hah! I could change it if you'd like!

On the point of free will, isn't it also argued that in order for God to be omnipotent that he must be all knowing which would mean that he already knows exactly how a person's life will play out?

Therefore God would know whether or not I was going to murder someone tomorrow, and if God made me then he made me with the knowledge of how I was going to act. I feel that both refutes the idea of an all-loving god (why would he make murderers?)

I'm not even going to discuss Hitler... Just drop a name... I'm sure we get the implications of such an argument.

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16-03-2010, 11:09 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
(16-03-2010 11:03 AM)Green Wrote:  
(16-03-2010 10:18 AM)ashley.hunt60 Wrote:  You stole mt sig Sad.

So I did! Hah! I could change it if you'd like!

On the point of free will, isn't it also argued that in order for God to be omnipotent that he must be all knowing which would mean that he already knows exactly how a person's life will play out?

Therefore God would know whether or not I was going to murder someone tomorrow, and if God made me then he made me with the knowledge of how I was going to act. I feel that both refutes the idea of an all-loving god (why would he make murderers?)

I'm not even going to discuss Hitler... Just drop a name... I'm sure we get the implications of such an argument.

Eh, you an keep the sig. It's not a big deal. I'll find something even better.

Getting to the real point. That is a flaw in the free will thing that has never escaped me. It gets the to point made in our signatures. Where is Martin? He, believing in god, could answer it a lot better than I, an atheist.

I don't believe Jesus is the son of God until I see the long form birth certificate!
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16-03-2010, 11:13 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
An interesting thing to note is that Paradise Lost, over years of literary analysis, has become a very anti-God poem in many ways. By todays standards Satan and his rebellion are glorified and even justified. It shows that Satan's portrayal in that particular literary work aligns with the way we think as a people today, greater independence from a greater power, the willingness to rebel against a rule we find unjust... Satan is more a hero in my eyes than God, at least in reference to Paradise Lost.

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16-03-2010, 11:21 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
(16-03-2010 11:13 AM)Green Wrote:  An interesting thing to note is that Paradise Lost, over years of literary analysis, has become a very anti-God poem in many ways. By todays standards Satan and his rebellion are glorified and even justified. It shows that Satan's portrayal in that particular literary work aligns with the way we think as a people today, greater independence from a greater power, the willingness to rebel against a rule we find unjust... Satan is more a hero in my eyes than God, at least in reference to Paradise Lost.

I did note that too. I have never read the bible, so I didn't feel right giving a serious comment on it, but Satan really does seem like the good guy. If I found myself working for someone that had to power to save millions, but didn't, I would certainly rebel as well. I think that most people today would either rebel, or at least feel the need to.

I don't believe Jesus is the son of God until I see the long form birth certificate!
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16-03-2010, 11:45 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
For those who haven't read it yet, here's a link to "Paradise Lost" in its entirety. I would highly encourage reading it. It's beautifully written.

"Owl," said Rabbit shortly, "you and I have brains. The others have fluff. If there is any thinking to be done in this Forest - and when I say thinking I mean thinking - you and I must do it."
- A. A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner
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17-03-2010, 01:16 AM
RE: Nonbelief and the logic that supports it
(16-03-2010 11:45 AM)Unbeliever Wrote:  For those who haven't read it yet, here's a link to "Paradise Lost" in its entirety. I would highly encourage reading it. It's beautifully written.

I would very much like to, but it'd probably take me ages, as I'm a very slow reader Shy

All learning is quite useless if you haven't learned to question what you learn.
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