"Nothingness"
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29-04-2015, 01:57 PM
RE: "Nothingness"
Having just checked my bank balance, I can confirm without doubt that 'nothingness' does indeed exist! Big Grin

In all seriousness, I like the concept of 'nothing' being relative. It could be argued that the moment you define what it is, it ceases to be 'nothing' as it would have to be 'something' in order for you to acknowledge/understand its existence...

I swear something just went 'pop' inside my head...Hobo

"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too"? - Douglas Adams Bechased
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29-04-2015, 04:07 PM
RE: "Nothingness"
I thought nothingness is the absence of existence, and it sounds to me like a category error to talk about the existence of nothingness.

Quantum Physics: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
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29-04-2015, 05:34 PM
RE: "Nothingness"
If you don't have a coordinate such as x,y,z at time t then how can you ask if we have something or nothing there?
If you do have the coordinates then we can go to those co-ordinates and observe if something is there or if nothing is there.

But even with coordinates it is difficult because Space is non euclidean. Parrallel lines don't remain parallel, even the passage of time is inconsistent depending on how fast you travel, what accelleration you experience, pressure, rotation and gravitation. So how do we effectively map out a coordinate system of the universe?
We have fields which permiate throughout space (are everywhere) i.e, gravaton field, electromagnetic field, higgs field etc. Is it possible to find a "location" where these fields are not present?
According to quantum physics and the uncertainty principle we cannot know the energy levels of a point in space.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-point_energy
"The uncertainty principle requires every physical system to have a zero-point energy greater than the minimum of its classical potential well. This results in motion even at absolute zero."
"Vacuum energy is the zero-point energy of all the fields in space, which in the Standard Model includes the electromagnetic field, other gauge fields, fermionic fields, and the Higgs field. It is the energy of the vacuum, which in quantum field theory is defined not as empty space but as the ground state of the fields."
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29-04-2015, 08:00 PM
RE: "Nothingness"
What is the origin of zero? How did we indicate nothingness before zero?

#sigh
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29-04-2015, 08:15 PM (This post was last modified: 29-04-2015 08:31 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: "Nothingness"
(29-04-2015 04:07 PM)Alex K Wrote:  I thought nothingness is the absence of existence, and it sounds to me like a category error to talk about the existence of nothingness.

It does sound like a category error except the empty set is untyped. But without the existence of the concept we would be well, nowhere. It can't exist and yet it must exist for us to make sense. It's a conundrum wrapped in an enigma expressed as a paradox presented as a palindrome that DLJ will find an anagram for.

I have met God and it is Ø. All things can be generated from it. Without it, nothing can exist.

#sigh
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