OCD not funny or cute
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13-10-2017, 03:02 PM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
My point was not to stop comedy doing comedy. If you make a good OCD joke, i will absolutely laugh about it.
What my point was that ticks and OCD are not the same and should socially not be treated as if they were the same.
If somebody has a tick you can toy with them without actually doing damage.
If somebody has OCD and you toy with their compulsions, you are doing real damage.
That is why I was so annoyed at the show thing with that judge. They were toying with him because of his disorder so that they could be "funny" and ridicule him. Ha, ha, ha. Consent is the magic word. And consent was not given in his case.

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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13-10-2017, 03:19 PM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
Here's a hilarious one. IMO.

And then there's the whole "I'm OCD" thing which takes the stupid to a whole new level. Yeah, you're OCD and my mother is lupus Facepalm

Experts across the country are warning that America is in the throes of a new mental health epidemic. Over the past decade, psychologists have reported record numbers of those who suffer from being, like, suuuuper OCD – and the figures are only getting worse.

“Super OCD” is not to be confused with textbook obsessive compulsive disorder, which can be characterized by unwanted compulsive rituals and disturbing intrusive thoughts that detract from one’s quality of life. Rather, those who are super OCD report experiencing symptoms that include adherence to conventions of basic human hygiene and really liking their pencils to be sharp.

“It’s a nightmare,” said Amy Smith, whose harrowing journey to acceptance began when she took an online quiz that one time which gauged her reaction to disturbing images like crooked pictures and floor tiles that don’t match up.

“When I see something that is uneven, it kind of bugs me. Almost no one else feels this way; I am very unique,” Smith confessed. “I’m able to forget about the uneven thing as soon as I look away, but for those few seconds the mild displeasure is overwhelming.”

Jane Lee first suspected she was super OCD after she spent a leisurely afternoon alphabetizing her collection of cookbooks. Her fears were confirmed when a co-worker wore mismatched socks to the office and she felt compelled to look away.

“I’ll be out with friends and everything is going fine, and then something will happen – someone will drop a slice or pizza or spill wine down my shirt, so I’ll say ‘better clean that up.’ And everyone will just go silent,” Lee said. “It’s like the elephant in the room.”

Lee experienced the stigma associated with the illness firsthand when her cousin Jen, who has conventional obsessive compulsive disorder, suggested that Lee was not, in fact, super OCD.

“For some people mental illness means debilitating panic attacks and uncontrollable, repetitive actions, and for others it means preferring your jackets face the same way in your closet,” Lee said. “It’s a spectrum.”

Psychiatrist Dr. Frank Black studies the disorder and deems himself a pioneer in the field. According to Black, super OCD is still considered a fringe issue, with many health professionals unwilling to classify it as “something that exists.”

“Some of my colleagues would define mental illness as that which ‘interferes with people’s lives,’ but I think that’s a narrow-minded way of looking at things,” he said. “I had this one patient who would sometimes double-check that he’d locked his car. The seconds it took for him to do that are seconds he’ll never get back.”

Black has dedicated his career to developing treatment strategies for patients like Amy and Jane, and he hopes other brave sufferers will continue to come out of their immaculate closets and seek the therapy they need.

“If I can help even one person hang their blue sweaters next to their red sweaters, I know I’ll have done my job.”

One of the dumbest people I've ever met in my life once told me I didn't have OCD because I didn't like my room real tidy. Like I said, that was one dumbass bozo and my deepest shame is that for about a week I thought I had a crush on him (even if only because he had a huge thing for me. No, not *that* kind of thing Dodgy Well, not just that kind of thing, anyway Rolleyes )


Also, came across this other day, found it interesting: "Complex computer modeling demonstrates that obsessive-compulsive disorder patients learn about their environments but don’t use that information to guide their actions"

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13-10-2017, 04:13 PM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
Very interesting read Vera. Both the spoiler and the article!

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13-10-2017, 04:20 PM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
Poking fun at anyone for any medical related reason is just not funny to me. But poking fun AT Tourettes Syndrome itself? Okay I guess I have a twisted sense of humor. Cause I think this t-shirt is fucking hilarious.

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13-10-2017, 07:04 PM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
If that shirt said "nigger" instead of "cunt" I still wouldn't think it was funny but if I saw someone wearing it I'd at least think they had some balls.
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13-10-2017, 07:20 PM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
(13-10-2017 04:20 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  Poking fun at anyone for any medical related reason is just not funny to me. But poking fun AT Tourettes Syndrome itself? Okay I guess I have a twisted sense of humor. Cause I think this t-shirt is fucking hilarious.

[Image: shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcTZN30CrgRFp3hc_dsbd...p;usqp=CAE]
I had a friend with Tourette, and he'd probably wear it. He doesn't have any verbal tics, but I'm sure he'd love it.
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13-10-2017, 07:25 PM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
(13-10-2017 03:02 PM)Leerob Wrote:  My point was not to stop comedy doing comedy. If you make a good OCD joke, i will absolutely laugh about it.
What my point was that ticks and OCD are not the same and should socially not be treated as if they were the same.
If somebody has a tick you can toy with them without actually doing damage.
If somebody has OCD and you toy with their compulsions, you are doing real damage.
That is why I was so annoyed at the show thing with that judge. They were toying with him because of his disorder so that they could be "funny" and ridicule him. Ha, ha, ha. Consent is the magic word. And consent was not given in his case.

Yes, you make an excellent point.

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14-10-2017, 01:46 AM
RE: OCD not funny or cute
Leerob,

IMHO there is little in OCD to laugh at, or in 'ticks' or any other debilitating health condition.

I saw a TV sitcom in which a guy with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) was being mocked as a weak character. Whoever made up that gag might enjoy a couple of weeks of bowel spasms? I think not.

D.
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