OCD
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
16-03-2013, 06:24 PM
RE: OCD
Don't know if its OCD but I always swallow viaga very quickly.....................never suffered from a stiff neck! Blush
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
09-05-2018, 07:56 PM (This post was last modified: 09-05-2018 08:03 PM by Vera.)
RE: OCD
Yes, I'm necroposting (and after what a post, too Dodgy ), but didn't want to start a new thread, really.

My OCD has been acting up something horrible this last week or so (feeling kinda trapped in the place I'm staying at for a while, after having my own house - and a terrace - for so long is absolutely not helping either), to the extent that I can barely work or concentrate or *anything* other than what feels like a hamster running in the wheel of my head, so was trying to find some tricks, anything to get it under some semblance of control at least, and came across this article. (And yeah, I once tried even the elastic band crap. Apparently, it worked miracles Dodgy )

"Two of the main features of OCD are doubt and guilt
While it is not understood why this is so, these are considered hallmarks of the disorder. Unless you understand these, you cannot understand OCD. In the 19th century, OCD was known as the “doubting disease.” OCD can make a sufferer doubt even the most basic things about themselves, others, or the world they live in. I have seen patients doubt their sexuality, their sanity, their perceptions, whether or not they are responsible for the safety of total strangers, the likelihood that they will become murderers, etc. I have even seen patients have doubts about whether they were actually alive or not. Doubt is one of the more maddening qualities of OCD. It can override even the keenest intelligence. It is a doubt that cannot be quenched. It is doubt raised to the highest power. It is what causes sufferers to check things hundreds of times, or to ask endless questions of themselves or others. Even when an answer is found, it may only stick for several minutes, only to slip away as if it was never there. Only when sufferers recognize the futility of trying to resolve this doubt, can they begin to make progress.

The guilt is another excruciating part of the disorder. It is rather easy to make people with OCD feel guilty about most anything, as many of them already have a surplus of it. They often feel responsible for things that no one would ever take upon themselves.

Although you can resist performing a compulsion, you cannot refuse to think an obsessive thought.

Obsessions are biochemically generated mental events that seem to resemble one’s own real thoughts, but aren’t. One of my patients used to refer to them as “My synthetic thoughts.” They are as counterfeit bills are to real ones, or as wax fruit is to real fruit. As biochemical events, they cannot simply be shut off at will."

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Vera's post
09-05-2018, 08:10 PM
RE: OCD
(09-05-2018 07:56 PM)Vera Wrote:  Obsessions are biochemically generated mental events that seem to resemble one’s own real thoughts, but aren’t. One of my patients used to refer to them as “My synthetic thoughts.” They are as counterfeit bills are to real ones, or as wax fruit is to real fruit. As biochemical events, they cannot simply be shut off at will." [/i]

I can relate to such thoughts on two levels.

One is grief - it comes in waves and your thoughts and emotions are completely out of context, and you think you have gone crazy because you have no control.

The other is menopause - as the hormone levels fluctuate, so does your mood and so do your thoughts. Here, too, you have no control and think you have gone nuts.

I don't have OCD though, so I am not sure if these are the same type of thoughts or not.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Dom's post
09-05-2018, 09:48 PM
RE: OCD
(09-05-2018 07:56 PM)Vera Wrote:  Yes, I'm necroposting (and after what a post, too Dodgy ), but didn't want to start a new thread, really.

My OCD has been acting up something horrible this last week or so (feeling kinda trapped in the place I'm staying at for a while, after having my own house - and a terrace - for so long is absolutely not helping either), to the extent that I can barely work or concentrate or *anything* other than what feels like a hamster running in the wheel of my head, so was trying to find some tricks, anything to get it under some semblance of control at least, and came across this article. (And yeah, I once tried even the elastic band crap. Apparently, it worked miracles Dodgy )

"Two of the main features of OCD are doubt and guilt
While it is not understood why this is so, these are considered hallmarks of the disorder. Unless you understand these, you cannot understand OCD. In the 19th century, OCD was known as the “doubting disease.” OCD can make a sufferer doubt even the most basic things about themselves, others, or the world they live in. I have seen patients doubt their sexuality, their sanity, their perceptions, whether or not they are responsible for the safety of total strangers, the likelihood that they will become murderers, etc. I have even seen patients have doubts about whether they were actually alive or not. Doubt is one of the more maddening qualities of OCD. It can override even the keenest intelligence. It is a doubt that cannot be quenched. It is doubt raised to the highest power. It is what causes sufferers to check things hundreds of times, or to ask endless questions of themselves or others. Even when an answer is found, it may only stick for several minutes, only to slip away as if it was never there. Only when sufferers recognize the futility of trying to resolve this doubt, can they begin to make progress.

The guilt is another excruciating part of the disorder. It is rather easy to make people with OCD feel guilty about most anything, as many of them already have a surplus of it. They often feel responsible for things that no one would ever take upon themselves.

Although you can resist performing a compulsion, you cannot refuse to think an obsessive thought.

Obsessions are biochemically generated mental events that seem to resemble one’s own real thoughts, but aren’t. One of my patients used to refer to them as “My synthetic thoughts.” They are as counterfeit bills are to real ones, or as wax fruit is to real fruit. As biochemical events, they cannot simply be shut off at will."

Ah that explains my sudden bout of confusion.

Whelp no worries, better to necro post and share your struggles with people who give a shit than bottle it up till it destroys ya eh?

Can't help you with guilt, I know it can be a big deal, but for me I almost never feel guilty because I work very hard to never have a reason to feel guilty, and when I do I wrap that shit up quick. That's why ya'll see me always try to own my shit when I dun fucked up. I don't like letting that shit fester in my mind.

However, I do kinda understand what obsessive thoughts can be like (I think, maybe), mind running around in circles thinking the exact same things. Then I get stupid and talk about it and annoy the fuck out of the few friends I have. How the fuck they continue to put up with me is far beyond me. I don't think I have OCD though, I'm pretty sure what I do is related to "panic" attacks. After a while I can calm down and be normal again, though due to life problems last few years, I'm constantly having ..... issues..... I can barely function at all. I need to get my shit together.

Anyway, I wish I could help you Vera, all I can really do is offer you a digital hug though Hug

(By the way, those pictures you posted, what asshole made such horrific things. Like that's just wrong. Fucker that made those pictures deserves to be kicked in the balls, and yes I'm assuming only a guy could be that much of a dick. Edit^ Correction cosmo dude posted the pictures, seeing them made me feel like murder and I wasn't thinking straight, apologies)

DLJ Wrote:And, yes, the principle of freedom of expression works both ways... if someone starts shit, better shit is the best counter-argument.
Big Grin
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes JesseB's post
09-05-2018, 10:43 PM
RE: OCD
(30-10-2012 06:51 AM)Vera Wrote:  
Since a lot of people here seem to have a mental quirk or two and since there already are more serious threads about it, I was wondering if someone might like to share their experience with OCD.

I myself have been known to have a compulsion or two (and to have gotten rid of one or two).

When I was a kid I would add letters while reading, until I got a sum total of fifteen; sometimes I could only use two words (e.g. one with 7 and one with 8 letters), sometimes - three, but they couldn't have the same number of letters (e.g. 3, 3 and 9 wouldn't work, but 3, 4 and 8 would), etc. I got to be very good at knowing exactly how many letters a word had just by looking at it for a second.

Then one day I was watching a subtitled movie (that was way back when I still didn't speak English) and I realised it was too much, having to follow the plot, read the subtitles and add the letters from the words in the subtitles. So that's when I realised I had to quit (or learn EnglishWink). Luckily I managed to do both.

I'm not saying that other compulsions didn't take its place (some have been religious), but still, it's not an easy thing to get rid of a compulsion or an obsession.

Anyone else had to struggle with compulsions or obsessions?


Not me personally, but my grandmother had OCD really bad, and it only worsened with age. She was always a clean freak. My family used to joke that we could eat off of her floor. I can probably count the number of times in my life when I saw her actually sit down and relax. She claimed sitting for any amount of time hurt her knees. Her days normally consisted of standing, crouching, and climbing to find any and everything to clean. It appeared to physically pain her when someone did the dishes or vacuumed for her. I'm pretty sure she would re-wash the dishes after we left.

Cleaning remained her quirk, but her OCD tunnel vision focused on those under her care. When my grandfather became sick she looked after him like a mother would her child, constantly being in his face and asking if he needed anything. This got on his nerves. After he passed away, she focused on her dog. She cooked her chicken and rice every. single. day. And the dog was so damn spoiled that she would often turn up her nose to everything but treats. So the chicken and rice would just sit there until it had to be thrown out (and then the cycle would continue the next day). My grandmother would also take the dog outside to pee every ten minutes. This is not an exaggeration.

Her physical and mental health started to deteriorate in her later years, so much so that she was put into a home and my sister took in her dog. She was diagnosed with cerebral small vessel disease in her late 70s. Like the name suggests, the blood vessels in the brain begin to constrict. This can lead to dementia and it did. This kicked her cleaning OCD into overdrive. Combine this with a failing memory and you’ve got the recipe for disaster. I remember one time calling her at 8am to tell her that I would come visit in a few hours (I had errands to run first). She said that she was about to get in the shower then. I arrived at noon and was told to wait a minute before entering because she unlocked the door in the buff. When I entered she was in the bathroom and claimed she was about to get into the shower. This confused me, so I reminded her about what she told me earlier. She didn’t remember saying that at all. She just kept on chanting “I can’t get clean” over and over again. That’s when I ran and got a nurse, who put clothes on her and forced her to sit down. It turns out my grandmother had forgotten to take her meds and had been standing in the bathroom for hours scrubbing herself raw with a wash cloth. She died a few months later from dementia-related issues.

My sister and I visited her quite often—missing loads of work and spending days and weeks with her—while she lived independently and even more so after she was transferred to the rest home. We tried our best, but severe OCD consumed what should have been her golden years.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like ghostexorcist's post
10-05-2018, 05:06 AM
RE: OCD
(09-05-2018 07:56 PM)Vera Wrote:  Yes, I'm necroposting (and after what a post, too Dodgy ), but didn't want to start a new thread, really.

My OCD has been acting up something horrible this last week or so (feeling kinda trapped in the place I'm staying at for a while, after having my own house - and a terrace - for so long is absolutely not helping either), to the extent that I can barely work or concentrate or *anything* other than what feels like a hamster running in the wheel of my head, so was trying to find some tricks, anything to get it under some semblance of control at least, and came across this article. (And yeah, I once tried even the elastic band crap. Apparently, it worked miracles Dodgy )

"Two of the main features of OCD are doubt and guilt
While it is not understood why this is so, these are considered hallmarks of the disorder. Unless you understand these, you cannot understand OCD. In the 19th century, OCD was known as the “doubting disease.” OCD can make a sufferer doubt even the most basic things about themselves, others, or the world they live in. I have seen patients doubt their sexuality, their sanity, their perceptions, whether or not they are responsible for the safety of total strangers, the likelihood that they will become murderers, etc. I have even seen patients have doubts about whether they were actually alive or not. Doubt is one of the more maddening qualities of OCD. It can override even the keenest intelligence. It is a doubt that cannot be quenched. It is doubt raised to the highest power. It is what causes sufferers to check things hundreds of times, or to ask endless questions of themselves or others. Even when an answer is found, it may only stick for several minutes, only to slip away as if it was never there. Only when sufferers recognize the futility of trying to resolve this doubt, can they begin to make progress.

The guilt is another excruciating part of the disorder. It is rather easy to make people with OCD feel guilty about most anything, as many of them already have a surplus of it. They often feel responsible for things that no one would ever take upon themselves.

Although you can resist performing a compulsion, you cannot refuse to think an obsessive thought.

Obsessions are biochemically generated mental events that seem to resemble one’s own real thoughts, but aren’t. One of my patients used to refer to them as “My synthetic thoughts.” They are as counterfeit bills are to real ones, or as wax fruit is to real fruit. As biochemical events, they cannot simply be shut off at will."

I really liked that article. I don't have OCD but have some compulsive behaviors and thoughts that derail me sometimes. Realizing that it's a lifetime, relapsing-remitting condition helps me not blame myself as much when progress is undone for a while. It's useful to remind myself that I've gotten out of the weeds before, so I can do it again.

While the article says it doesn't work, I've found saying no aloud a useful temporary technique. Also the AA one-day-at-a-time concept works for me in terms of living with bad feelings and thoughts without self-soothing in destructive ways--though sometimes I have to cut it down to hours or minutes.

fudge is the only divinity that matters
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes julep's post
10-05-2018, 08:18 AM
RE: OCD
My nephew has OCD. He's constantly cleaning and washing his hands but he takes medication for it and it seems to help. He's a psychologist. I've never had any sort of OCD but I do worry, mostly about my kids but I don't think it's anything out of the ordinary worrying parent stuff. As for cleaning.....I'm a slob. A messy housekeeper. The only place I keep fairly clean in the kitchen and the only reason I clean the kitchen so well is because if I don't the ants come and take our food away. People with a cleaning type of OCD would never set foot in my house.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes dancefortwo's post
11-05-2018, 07:45 AM
RE: OCD
Dom, since I've been on the pill I think (or delude myself) that my moods don't fluctuate as much. I've been wrong before though... Rolleyes

Julep, indeed...

"Tell me what to do
All the hopes and the dreams went wrong for me
There's a smile on my face
But I'm only pretending

Taking my life
One day at a time
Cause I can't think what else to do
[...]

Tell me what to do
Now there's nobody watching over me
If I seem to be calm
Well, it's all an illusion
Tell me what to do
When the fear of the night comes over me
There's a smile on my face
Just to hide the confusion

Taking my life
One day at a time
Cause I can't think what else to do...

And the same old sun would shine in the morning
The same bright stars would welcome me home
And the clouds would rise way over my head
I'll get through my life on my own"






Ghost, this is so sad...

Jesse, I don't think I have much choice in feeling or not feeling guilty (my mother hates it because, apparently, I bring guilt into way too many situations where it's not about it at all). I used to blame some crap that happened to me as a teen... and I still think it played a role in it, if nothing else, it found the most fertile soil it could hope for in me. Then again, we can't go through life blaming others for our own fucked-upness. We *can* blame ourselves for everything under the sun though...

Dance, not much of a cleaner myself either. One of the dumbest people I've ever met (and slept with... for shame!) once told me that if I didn't like things all neat and shit I didn't have OCD. Did I mention he was - and is - an idiot Facepalm

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like Vera's post
11-05-2018, 08:29 AM
RE: OCD
Vera, what are you specifically obsessing over? Do you have friends to talk to. If I remember correctly from another thread you are taking a trip to South America? Will travel help break up your thoughts?

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
11-05-2018, 08:37 AM
RE: OCD
Dance, I am in South America right now. And travelling does help.

Thing is, with OCD it's not really a specific thing that you obsess over (I mean, it could be, but it's the OCD that makes you obsess, more than the thing triggers your OCD, if this makes any sense Rolleyes )

And friends are to listen to and be there for, not talk about myself or bother with my insignificant life with. Learnt my lesson long ago Yes

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Vera's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: