Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
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19-12-2015, 09:21 AM
RE: Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
(12-12-2015 10:11 PM)musicharmony87 Wrote:  I been angry at God for 4 years and now I'm not angry. I'm as happy as can be. I've been doing research about religion and the Big Bang hoping to get answers of gods existence. I watched a wonderful documentary about the Big Bang and Stephen Hawking narrated it. He then got me thinking and I kept on researching. What he said in the documentary made a whole lot of sense! He said something a long the lines of there was no time for God to create the earth because there was no time. I think he also said that before the Big Bang there was no God. It made a whole lot of sense to me and he just made me think.

So now I'm like okay I found out my answer. Then I research religion and find out it was made to control the masses. Okay so I found that out.

My point is I still don't want to pursue this religion anymore. But I still question why I don't want to believe anymore.

Maybe it is time to get past the anger. Leave that to the religionists!
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19-12-2015, 12:16 PM
RE: Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
(19-12-2015 09:21 AM)DerFish Wrote:  
(12-12-2015 10:11 PM)musicharmony87 Wrote:  I been angry at God for 4 years and now I'm not angry. I'm as happy as can be. I've been doing research about religion and the Big Bang hoping to get answers of gods existence. I watched a wonderful documentary about the Big Bang and Stephen Hawking narrated it. He then got me thinking and I kept on researching. What he said in the documentary made a whole lot of sense! He said something a long the lines of there was no time for God to create the earth because there was no time. I think he also said that before the Big Bang there was no God. It made a whole lot of sense to me and he just made me think.

So now I'm like okay I found out my answer. Then I research religion and find out it was made to control the masses. Okay so I found that out.

My point is I still don't want to pursue this religion anymore. But I still question why I don't want to believe anymore.

Maybe it is time to get past the anger. Leave that to the religionists!

In my experience religions are based on hatred. SO when we escape therefrom we can finally be happy. No longer any need to have fear of a God that will throw you into a Hell that He made if you don't keep the laws that He Himself has declared are impossible to keep.
Don't worry Be happy!
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22-12-2015, 05:16 PM
Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
(19-12-2015 12:16 PM)DerFish Wrote:  
(19-12-2015 09:21 AM)DerFish Wrote:  Maybe it is time to get past the anger. Leave that to the religionists!

In my experience religions are based on hatred. SO when we escape therefrom we can finally be happy. No longer any need to have fear of a God that will throw you into a Hell that He made if you don't keep the laws that He Himself has declared are impossible to keep.
Don't worry Be happy!

You're right! I was never really afraid of God. I think the reason I became a Christian was because my siblings did. I never really felt God growing up and he didn't feel real to me.
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27-12-2015, 03:18 PM
RE: Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
I can only share from my own experience, and bring up the fact that anger is one of the first things that can happen when we experience a loss. It doesn't matter if the lost person/entity/being was never real to begin with, it was real to us.

As a male and a member of the ethnicity dominating my former Church, I never really felt there was anything I couldn't do. But then I figured out I was gay, and suddenly my entire relationship with my religion changed.

The anger came in when I began taking classes in human development. When I was crying every day because I was afraid to be alone, the people from Church with whom I'd confided in would tell me "Can't you understand there is more to life than sex?!" The I read Erikson, and I learned that fear of isolation and deep yearning for intimacy was characteristic of early-mid adolescence. Learning that I was being made to feel bad for being totally normal gave me this very empowering anger at religion and the individuals in my old community. When I feel like I miss the people and the traditions, this anger keeps my head on straight.

I think you can let this anger empower you. It will take a while to figure out why you feel the way you do, but that's okay.

I started seeing a therapist to help me through this transition - maybe you could consider that?
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27-12-2015, 03:26 PM
RE: Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
That's easy. Check out the afterparty. We got Brian Jones on drums and Hell's Angels for security.




There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
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29-02-2016, 04:47 PM
Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
(27-12-2015 03:18 PM)FreeThinker1994 Wrote:  I can only share from my own experience, and bring up the fact that anger is one of the first things that can happen when we experience a loss. It doesn't matter if the lost person/entity/being was never real to begin with, it was real to us.

As a male and a member of the ethnicity dominating my former Church, I never really felt there was anything I couldn't do. But then I figured out I was gay, and suddenly my entire relationship with my religion changed.

The anger came in when I began taking classes in human development. When I was crying every day because I was afraid to be alone, the people from Church with whom I'd confided in would tell me "Can't you understand there is more to life than sex?!" The I read Erikson, and I learned that fear of isolation and deep yearning for intimacy was characteristic of early-mid adolescence. Learning that I was being made to feel bad for being totally normal gave me this very empowering anger at religion and the individuals in my old community. When I feel like I miss the people and the traditions, this anger keeps my head on straight.

I think you can let this anger empower you. It will take a while to figure out why you feel the way you do, but that's okay.

I started seeing a therapist to help me through this transition - maybe you could consider that?

I am seeing a therapist for depression. But I also wanted to talk to him about losing my religion. I get sad when people talk about God and Jesus. Because I can't relate anymore. I can't share in their happiness. I just realized this the other week when my sister was talking about how a new believer is on fire for Christ and their face just lights up. I felt sad. I wish my family wasn't so religious. It's awkward sometimes. But I manage. Thank you for your reply.
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29-02-2016, 05:35 PM
RE: Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
(29-02-2016 04:47 PM)musicharmony87 Wrote:  I am seeing a therapist for depression. But I also wanted to talk to him about losing my religion. I get sad when people talk about God and Jesus. Because I can't relate anymore. I can't share in their happiness. I just realized this the other week when my sister was talking about how a new believer is on fire for Christ and their face just lights up. I felt sad. I wish my family wasn't so religious. It's awkward sometimes. But I manage. Thank you for your reply.

Good for you. Talking to someone can really help out a ton. I understand that you may feel that people who believe in jeebus are happier but that is probably the honeymoon phase. My bet is that the "happiness" they are seeing is merely the happiness of having everyone constantly telling them how happy they are for them and this person found an accepting ingroup. That is very powerful but it will wear off. I understand the not wanting to have a religious family, my wife is an evangelical and we live in the midwest where jeebus is on billboards.

From my experience, christians claim that believing makes them happier but in reality, it really doesn't. This is for several reasons IMO.
1) They feel sad for anyone who doesn't believe as they do. This is compounded by deeply caring for someone who doesn't believe as they do and then trying to reconcile that with the theology. I have seen this firsthand where someone very close to me literally made up a belief so that I wouldn't go to hell and they even acknowledged that it wasn't biblical when I pointed it out. The fact that they pay lip service to things being in god's hands and then lying to themselves tells me that they may not really believe that.
2) They feel uncomfortable with people having no faith. I also have experienced this firsthand where I have been carrying on a conversation with someone or sometime and they eventually figure out that I am not a christian. I have literally seen expressions change before my eyes. I think that some of this is because the bible says that people like us are evil, can do no good, and do not get too close to them.
3) They don't like what you represent. Again, from experience, it appears that my mere presence scares people because I represent the evil doubt that can dissuade people. I don't think that they are consciously avoiding me, but I do think that many are actually frightened at what I might say.

Hope for a speedy recovery. It gets better.

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
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29-02-2016, 05:38 PM
RE: Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
The beautiful thing about the answer. Do whatever makes you happy. Fill youre life with the things you find beautiful and intriguing.
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01-03-2016, 08:02 AM
Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
(29-02-2016 05:35 PM)The Organic Chemist Wrote:  
(29-02-2016 04:47 PM)musicharmony87 Wrote:  I am seeing a therapist for depression. But I also wanted to talk to him about losing my religion. I get sad when people talk about God and Jesus. Because I can't relate anymore. I can't share in their happiness. I just realized this the other week when my sister was talking about how a new believer is on fire for Christ and their face just lights up. I felt sad. I wish my family wasn't so religious. It's awkward sometimes. But I manage. Thank you for your reply.

Good for you. Talking to someone can really help out a ton. I understand that you may feel that people who believe in jeebus are happier but that is probably the honeymoon phase. My bet is that the "happiness" they are seeing is merely the happiness of having everyone constantly telling them how happy they are for them and this person found an accepting ingroup. That is very powerful but it will wear off. I understand the not wanting to have a religious family, my wife is an evangelical and we live in the midwest where jeebus is on billboards.

From my experience, christians claim that believing makes them happier but in reality, it really doesn't. This is for several reasons IMO.
1) They feel sad for anyone who doesn't believe as they do. This is compounded by deeply caring for someone who doesn't believe as they do and then trying to reconcile that with the theology. I have seen this firsthand where someone very close to me literally made up a belief so that I wouldn't go to hell and they even acknowledged that it wasn't biblical when I pointed it out. The fact that they pay lip service to things being in god's hands and then lying to themselves tells me that they may not really believe that.
2) They feel uncomfortable with people having no faith. I also have experienced this firsthand where I have been carrying on a conversation with someone or sometime and they eventually figure out that I am not a christian. I have literally seen expressions change before my eyes. I think that some of this is because the bible says that people like us are evil, can do no good, and do not get too close to them.
3) They don't like what you represent. Again, from experience, it appears that my mere presence scares people because I represent the evil doubt that can dissuade people. I don't think that they are consciously avoiding me, but I do think that many are actually frightened at what I might say.

Hope for a speedy recovery. It gets better.

I know for certain my parents don't like nonbelievers. They don't even like the glbt community. It's really sad.

Thank you for your post. I can relate to some of it. My parents will never know I'm not a believer. It would be too painful to them if I told them. Mainly because my dad brought me up a Christian.

I was doing some thinking yesterday. If God is perfect then shouldn't his creation be perfect? If God is perfect then there shouldn't be sin the world. This made me realize that God is man made. If God is perfect and there is no sin there is no need for Jesus.
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01-03-2016, 08:27 AM
RE: Okay so now I'm not angry at God now what?
I'm an atheist, but I want to correct you on some doctrinal issues that might get you into a tangle, if you try to argue this way with Christians:

"Sin" means "disobedience to God" (in reality, of course, it means "disobedient to the priests/prophets who tell you that God wants _______"), and the point of their Garden of Eden story is that the world was perfect and without death until our disobedience to God made it corrupt. And I'm not sure it actually follows that the creation must be "perfect" by our standards for the Creator to be perfect-- yes, we don't like HIV or Marburg virus, and a million other little nasties that nature has in store for us, but you're assuming it was God's duty to make the world safe/perfect for humans. It may well be that the world's operation by natural laws, flawed as that system seems to us suffering humans, is in fact The Plan™.

Where the problem comes in is the Christian assertion that disobedience to God (sin) is what caused the world to start operating by those natural laws. Why would it have been "perfect", before, and how? Did spiders use their venom to stun berries for later digestion? Why would a loving Creator put a live hand grenade in the middle of the playroom and tell the children not to touch it, knowing that they would certainly do so, given human nature (how we were made)? The entire premise of original sin falls when you start to realize that a being who demands our submission in response to a debt created by this being, under circumstances that would have gotten a parent arrested for child abuse, in order for us to be vicariously relieved of our "debt" to this being who created the debt in the first place, would be a monster. The story is simply not well-put-together.

The other problem of course is that we've been here for four billion years, evolving on this planet, and our ancestors stood up to walk and use tools over five million years ago. Our evolutionary heritage is quite solidly proven by DNA sequencing and other scientific studies, and it's pretty clear that the only difference between us and our ancestors is that we're taller, smarter, and have better tools. (The Agricultural Revolution played a big part in our evolution, we're now finding out, as well.) There's no evidence that a Garden was possible, let alone plausible, given what we know of the history of the region and the development of our species. We're xenophobic tribal animals, and we make clubs that unite the tribe in order to better stand against the other tribe -- religion is an outgrowth of that part of our evolutionary heritage. It's why they have to pick enemies to fear, even when not in danger, such as the LGBT community and "non-believers".

I suggest you read Sagan's The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. It really helped me when I was first deconverting from my evangelical upbringing. The good news is there's no one to be angry at... even those who lied to you didn't likely know they were lying. Just learn the actual facts of the world you live in, and lean on us for support. We'll be glad to help... many if not most of us have been where you are.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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