On This Day in American History
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18-08-2017, 08:16 AM
On This Day in American History
The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting American women the right to vote, was ratified on August 18, 1920.

Prior to that, in 1869, the Wyoming territory had been the first to grant women (age 21 and older) the right to vote. Wyoming would go on to be the first state to elect a female governor, in 1924. (Nellie Tayloe Ross went on to serve as the first female Director of the US Mint from 1933 to 1953.)

In 1878 the suffrage movement lobbied the U.S. Congress for a constitutional amendment. Congress formed committees in the House and Senate to study and debate the issue. Where menfolk studied and debated the issue for eight years before unsurprisingly when the proposal finally reached the Senate floor in 1886, it was defeated. That same year, President Grover Cleveland became the only President to wed in the Executive Mansion. (She was 28 years younger than him.)

In 1887 Argonia, Kansas elected the first woman mayor in the country. Susanna Salter could be elected, but couldn't vote in an election. 1892, 94 and 96, respectively, saw the election of the first woman Superintendent of Public Instruction (ND), Three women elected to the Colorado House of Representatives, and Utah's first woman state senator.

In 1890, the National American Women Suffrage Association was formed when two suffrage associations merged and began lobbying for women's right to vote, on a state-by-state basis. Over the course of the next 6 years Colorado, Utah and Idaho adopted amendments to their state constitutions granting women voting rights.

Between then and the ratification of the 19th amendment (97 years ago today) Alaska Territory, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington all granted women the right to vote.

In 1913, on the eve of the inauguration of President Woodrow Wilson hundreds of women were injured in a massive suffrage parade in the nation’s capital.

1916 saw Jeannette Rankin, a Republican from Montana become the first woman elected to Congress. She served from 1917 to 1919 and again from 1941 to 1942 and was the only lawmaker to vote against the US entering into both world wars.

In 1918 Wilson reversed his stand on women's right to vote and addressed the senate in favor of the movement, saying “I regard the extension of suffrage to women as vitally essential to the successful prosecution of the great war of humanity in which we are engaged.” The proposal lost in the Senate by two votes.

In 1919, U.S. Representative James R. Mann a Republican from Illinois proposed the House resolution to approve the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. This was passed by the House 304-89. Two weeks later the senate passed the 19th amendment 56 to 25, at which point it was sent to the states for ratification. By March of 1920, 35 states had ratified the amendment. This was one state shy of the two-thirds majority required to pass it.

Southern states, in particular, were vehemently opposed to granting women the right to vote. Seven southern states had rejected the amendment by the time it came down to Tennessee's turn to vote on August 18, 1920. 23-year-old Harry T. Burn, a Republican Representative cast the deciding vote, not based on his beliefs but rather on the urging of his mother to "be a good boy."

Less than four months later over 8 million women voted for the first time. How many of those were badgered, bullied and berated by the men in their lives to vote as the men wished, I do not know, but I can't quite imagine that NOT happening. Warren G. Harding, a Republican, was elected the 29th President. It took over 60 years for the last 12 states to ratify the 19th Amendment. Mississippi was the last, on March 22, 1984.

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18-08-2017, 05:40 PM
RE: On This Day in American History
(18-08-2017 08:16 AM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  23-year-old Harry T. Burn, a Republican Representative cast the deciding vote, not based on his beliefs but rather on the urging of his mother to "be a good boy."


I like these Katherine Harris forgotten characters in history stories. Smile

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18-08-2017, 05:48 PM
RE: On This Day in American History
Quote:Mississippi was the last

Mississippi is always last. What a shithole.

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18-08-2017, 07:02 PM
RE: On This Day in American History
I just looked it up----North Carolina didn't ratify it until 1971. Nineteen.Seventy.One. We were the next to the last state. Mississippi isn't the only one to suck. But then, the list I just got that from only has 48 states on it. Weird. It lists NC as #47 and Mississippi as #48. Either way, I was 12 before NC got the hell onboard.

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18-08-2017, 07:09 PM
RE: On This Day in American History
(18-08-2017 07:02 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  I just looked it up----North Carolina didn't ratify it until 1971. Nineteen.Seventy.One. We were the next to the last state. Mississippi isn't the only one to suck. But then, the list I just got that from only has 48 states on it. Weird. It lists NC as #47 and Mississippi as #48. Either way, I was 12 before NC got the hell onboard.

States like Alaska (formally) and Hawaii weren't added until after that so voting would be legal throughout those states (once they got full statehood)

but Mississippi...How does a state not ratify it? There were others after, did they ratify those?

Did women already have the vote, so they figured it doesn't matter? Or could a county refuse women to vote because they refused to ratify it?

I'm curious now..


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18-08-2017, 09:02 PM
RE: On This Day in American History
(18-08-2017 07:09 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  
(18-08-2017 07:02 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  I just looked it up----North Carolina didn't ratify it until 1971. Nineteen.Seventy.One. We were the next to the last state. Mississippi isn't the only one to suck. But then, the list I just got that from only has 48 states on it. Weird. It lists NC as #47 and Mississippi as #48. Either way, I was 12 before NC got the hell onboard.

States like Alaska (formally) and Hawaii weren't added until after that so voting would be legal throughout those states (once they got full statehood)

but Mississippi...How does a state not ratify it? There were others after, did they ratify those?

Did women already have the vote, so they figured it doesn't matter? Or could a county refuse women to vote because they refused to ratify it?

I'm curious now..

I would imagine that some of the opposition votes in the southern states were cast because dat der bible says weemen ain't supposed de lead a man.

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18-08-2017, 09:16 PM
RE: On This Day in American History
(18-08-2017 07:09 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  
(18-08-2017 07:02 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  I just looked it up----North Carolina didn't ratify it until 1971. Nineteen.Seventy.One. We were the next to the last state. Mississippi isn't the only one to suck. But then, the list I just got that from only has 48 states on it. Weird. It lists NC as #47 and Mississippi as #48. Either way, I was 12 before NC got the hell onboard.

States like Alaska (formally) and Hawaii weren't added until after that so voting would be legal throughout those states (once they got full statehood)

but Mississippi...How does a state not ratify it? There were others after, did they ratify those?

Did women already have the vote, so they figured it doesn't matter? Or could a county refuse women to vote because they refused to ratify it?

I'm curious now..

Once Tennessee ratified it the 2/3rds had been met so pretty much no other states needed to ratify it after that---we got the vote when Tennessee passed it. So yeah, we voted from then on and nobody could legally stop us. But as far as formalities go, it's shameful in my opinion that it took another 60+ years before the last of the rest of the states officially ratified it.

As a similar aside, the second amendment of the NC constitution clearly states that as an atheist I am not allowed to hold a public office. But many years ago the federal government basically said "whoa, nope, you can't do that." But NC has still not removed (overturned, repealed, whatever the proper legal term would be) that from our constitution. So pretty much any time an atheist gets elected in this state the losing opponent tries to use that part of the state constitution to cry foul over the atheist winning the vote. Shameful on so many levels.

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18-08-2017, 10:38 PM
RE: On This Day in American History
World War I changed men's perception that women were too weak minded to be able to vote. Women were out working in munitions factories and other traditionally masculine jobs during WW I and this gave the women's sufferage movement a big boost.

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19-08-2017, 08:01 AM
RE: On This Day in American History
WWII, even more so. But then after the menfolk returned from the war they took the jobs away from the women and gave them back to the men. And honestly I have mixed feelings about that. Returning military should have their jobs to return to. BUT we should have had equal rights/pay from that point forward, whenever a new job opening happened.

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19-08-2017, 11:22 AM
RE: On This Day in American History
(18-08-2017 07:02 PM)outtathereligioncloset Wrote:  I just looked it up----North Carolina didn't ratify it until 1971. Nineteen.Seventy.One. We were the next to the last state. Mississippi isn't the only one to suck. But then, the list I just got that from only has 48 states on it. Weird. It lists NC as #47 and Mississippi as #48. Either way, I was 12 before NC got the hell onboard.

Don't feel too bad, I was born in Switzerland and they didn't give women the right to vote federally until 1971, and the last Canton in Switzerland to allow women to vote in local elections was in 1991!

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