On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
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08-04-2013, 07:24 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
The younger you are, the stranger the concept of death is, and the more it scares you (as a rule).

As you get older the concept becomes more and more normal.

Once your peers are dying off, you start embracing the idea.

That is the natural course of it, and that is a very good thing.

Of course there are exceptions, I have considered death a friend for a very long time. It's like this is all a movie, and you can go and turn it off anytime.

So you won't be seeing me in any assisted living facilities, I figure when the body or the mind has run it's course, it's time to go.

Meanwhile, like the OP, I make sure I enjoy life to the fullest. I don't have time for drama and the like. I do have time for things I find enjoyable, and I enjoy as many of them every day as I possibly can.

Life is short is such a platitude, but there is a lot of truth to it. The thing young people don't get, is that only your body gets old and used up. Barring dementia, your mind never gets old. You never really feel old, and your childhood seems to have been just yesterday.

Like my mom said on her death bed: "Here I am, a young girl in an old woman's body. "

I nodded and thought I understood, but, really, I didn't quite get what that means until now.

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Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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08-04-2013, 07:28 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
I lost my fear of death when I had a loaded gun in my mouth.

The Reaper knows I'm not impressed by him anymore. Drinking Beverage

Through profound pain comes profound knowledge.
Ridi, Pagliaccio, sul tuo amore infranto! Ridi del duol, che t'avvelena il cor!
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08-04-2013, 09:29 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.

We passed the school, where children strove
At recess, in the ring;
We passed the fields of gazing grain,
We passed the setting sun.

Or rather, he passed us;
The dews grew quivering and chill,
For only gossamer my gown,
My tippet only tulle.

We paused before a house that seemed
A swelling of the ground;
The roof was scarcely visible,
The cornice but a mound.

Since then 'tis centuries, and yet each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses' heads
Were toward eternity.

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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08-04-2013, 09:36 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
(08-04-2013 09:29 AM)Phaedrus Wrote:  Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;

Emily certainly was one for death and dying. I always get sense when I read her that she had a miserable and depressed life.

“I suppose our capacity for self-delusion is boundless."
― John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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08-04-2013, 09:40 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
I'll see your Emily and raise you a McCrae...


In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

by John McCrae, May 1915

“I suppose our capacity for self-delusion is boundless."
― John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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08-04-2013, 10:16 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
I see your McCrae and raise you a Sir Mix-a-Lot



I like big butts and I can not lie
You other brothers can't deny
That when a girl walks in with an itty bitty waist
And a round thing in your face
You get sprung, wanna pull out your tough
'Cause you notice that butt was stuffed
Deep in the jeans she's wearing
I'm hooked and I can't stop staring
Oh baby, I wanna get with you
And take your picture
My homeboys tried to warn me
But that butt you got makes me so horny

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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08-04-2013, 10:48 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
(08-04-2013 10:16 AM)Phaedrus Wrote:  I see your McCrae and raise you a Sir Mix-a-Lot

I like big butts and I can not lie
You other brothers can't deny
That when a girl walks in with an itty bitty waist
And a round thing in your face
You get sprung, wanna pull out your tough
'Cause you notice that butt was stuffed
Deep in the jeans she's wearing
I'm hooked and I can't stop staring
Oh baby, I wanna get with you
And take your picture
My homeboys tried to warn me
But that butt you got makes me so horny

Fucking Phaedrus...thought I had you. You win Bowing

“I suppose our capacity for self-delusion is boundless."
― John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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08-04-2013, 10:57 AM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2013 11:10 AM by kim.)
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
(08-04-2013 09:36 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  
(08-04-2013 09:29 AM)Phaedrus Wrote:  Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;

Emily certainly was one for death and dying. I always get sense when I read her that she had a miserable and depressed life.

She clearly wasn't a "people person" but I also think she had a controlling family situation so, felt uncomfortable being around what she might have considered "normal" people. At an early age, she had a close friend die and I think she became obsessed with the whole death aspect. She and her mother were not emotionally close so, Emily was left to ponder these deep issues within her own mind. She was even sent to a sanitarium for a brief period to recover from the obsessively "deep sadness" over her friend's death.

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
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08-04-2013, 11:27 AM
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
Damn you Full Circle. Dodgy
Here's some interesting wiki fodder about Emily...

In 1845, a religious revival took place in Amherst, resulting in 46 confessions of faith among Dickinson's peers. Dickinson wrote to a friend the following year: "I never enjoyed such perfect peace and happiness as the short time in which I felt I had found my savior." She went on to say that it was her "greatest pleasure to commune alone with the great God & to feel that he would listen to my prayers."
However...
The experience did not last: Dickinson never made a formal declaration of faith and attended services regularly for only a few years. After her church-going ended, about 1852, she wrote a poem, opening:

Some keep the Sabbath going to Church
I keep it, staying at Home.

Later, a school she attended reported her leaving was the result of her "rebellion against the evangelical fervor present at the school".

Perhaps Emily kept herself closeted to keep society safe. Wink

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
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08-04-2013, 01:58 PM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2013 02:04 PM by Tartarus Sauce.)
RE: On death and dying -- food for thought for atheists
Death is a strange concept for me, but it is one that I have embraced. Part of this may of course result from the fact that I am only 19 and have not existed for that long a period of time. The other part though is shared by all humans; I can know that death is my ultimate fate and the fate for all organisms yet continue to live my life as if I will not perish. This is because death is simply not something that can be experienced until it happens. I cannot form thoughts on death from experience, and therefore neither can my ongoing, conscience perspective of living adjust to its fate.

It is somewhat like trying to imagine the unimaginable. If we were to go with the assumption that oblivion waits in store for us--- and if we were to go by Occam's Razor this is indisputably the correct assumption to make--- we can conceive of what this means but not relate to it on a base level. This is evident by the way that we describe "oblivion" death: like a dreamless sleep from which one never awakens. I can perfectly relate to this analogy on a conceptual level, but not on an experiential one, because I have never had a sleep from which I have never awoken. We cannot truly imagine what it is like to not-exist.

Hell, one could argue that the whole notion of an afterlife is essentially to counter this incapability of imaging non-existence by replacing it with eternal existence.

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