Open Interview about atheism
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18-11-2013, 12:12 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
1. I wasn't raised in a particularly religious home, so really, I realized I was an atheist when I learned the meaning of the word. I've questioned, but never believed. As for practicing, I can't imagine how one would even begin to "practice" atheism.

2. Nothing drew me to atheism. I started out this way. Atheism is not a philosophy. It is simply lack of belief.

3. My core ideals come from my ever evolving understanding of morality. I do not employ faith whenever I can help it. I don't feel faith is something that I intrinsically have, and must place somewhere. I simply lack faith in a deity.

4. Same as Websters.

5. That's a whole other thread.

6. Life hasn't a meaning to begin with. Fortunately, that doesn't mean our lives can't be meaningful.

7. We've been over the "practicing" thing already. I do enjoy my relationships with fellow atheists, but I realize that our commonality is insignificant. The comraderie atheists tend to feel is, in my opinion, almost always based of the negative effects religion has had on them. It's why I don,t bother to debate religion anymore.

8. Agnosticism refers to knowledge. Atheism refers to belief. I am an agnostic atheist, meaning I don,t believe in a deity, nor do I know whether or not one exists.

9. Lol, by suffering.

10. Nuthin. When you're done, you're done.


How was that?

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18-11-2013, 12:17 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(18-11-2013 12:12 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  1. I wasn't raised in a particularly religious home, so really, I realized I was an atheist when I learned the meaning of the word. I've questioned, but never believed. As for practicing, I can't imagine how one would even begin to "practice" atheism.

2. Nothing drew me to atheism. I started out this way. Atheism is not a philosophy. It is simply lack of belief.

3. My core ideals come from my ever evolving understanding of morality. I do not employ faith whenever I can help it. I don't feel faith is something that I intrinsically have, and must place somewhere. I simply lack faith in a deity.

4. Same as Websters.

5. That's a whole other thread.

6. Life hasn't a meaning to begin with. Fortunately, that doesn't mean our lives can't be meaningful.

7. We've been over the "practicing" thing already. I do enjoy my relationships with fellow atheists, but I realize that our commonality is insignificant. The comraderie atheists tend to feel is, in my opinion, almost always based of the negative effects religion has had on them. It's why I don,t bother to debate religion anymore.

8. Agnosticism refers to knowledge. Atheism refers to belief. I am an agnostic atheist, meaning I don,t believe in a deity, nor do I know whether or not one exists.

9. Lol, by suffering.

10. Nuthin. When you're done, you're done.


How was that?

That was great, thank you so much! Smile
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18-11-2013, 12:18 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(18-11-2013 12:11 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  Hi everyone!
I'm a senior at a high school in Chicago and I'm writing a paper about people's relationship to the sacred. We need to do a few interviews, so I was wondering if anyone wanted to answer a few questions about atheism? You don't have to answer them all. If you do answer some, thanks in advance! Smile

1. When did you fully realize your atheism, and when did you officially start practicing?
2. What made you come to the realization that you were an atheist? Why were you drawn to this philosophy?
3. Many religions/beliefs have core ideals, often coming from a central doctrine. What makes up the base of your philosophy? What do you put your faith in, if not a deity?
4. What is your definition of “truth”?
5. Does your ideology impact the way you interact with others, or the way others interact with you? Has it ever caused conflict?
6. Where/how do you find meaning in life?
7. How do you practice your ideology? Is it important for you to have a regular communal relationship with other people who share in your philosophy?
8. What do you think difference is between atheism and agnosticism?
9. How should people deal with suffering and pain in the world? How do you deal with it?
10. What do you think happens after death?

1: At age 12 I realized that the christian god was a lie. I perfected my atheism shortly after that and decided to stop practicing.

2: The classic Problem of Evil. There has never been a successful resolution to how an Omnipotent Omniscient Omni-benevolent God would allow the amount of suffering that exists in the world. Either God is false in which case why worship a false deity or he is evil in which case he deserves no worship.

3: I am a humanist. I put faith in the fact that actually helping people, rather than begging some imaginary friend to help them for me, will improve their lives and as the individual goes so goes the group. Helping them helps all of us.

4: Truth is that which can be proven. Mathematics are the only realm in which we may know the whole truth. For everything else you must take the available evidence and follow where it leads. Everything we "Know" right now may be false (and undoubtedly some or most of it is probably going to change with future discoveries) but as long as you act rationally and use some healthy skepticism you should be ok.

5: Very rarely. Most people follow humanist ideals even under the guise of religion. The few people I have had issues with are more worried about labels than with actions.

6: I make my own. Life and the universe simply are, meaning is up to the individual.

7: I just try not to be a dick. As to communion, no I don't do that. I prefer small groups to large crowds so I'm not one of those who would go to an Atheist "Church" or anything like that.

8: Semantics. very few people are true agnostics (50/50 truly undecided) most people fall along a scale of 1-7 with 1 being the Gnostic theist (I know there is a god) and 7 being the Gnostic Atheist (I know there is No God) I consider myself a 6.9 because as I said earlier there is always a chance what I know now may be false.

9: Help someone. Doesn't have to be everyone but just try and help someone. Even if it is just giving a homeless man a sandwich. Try to make the world a better place than when you found it.

10: Nothing. I believe death is much the same as pre-birth once neural function stops there is no preservation of ego or identity. Life is ultimately short and it is the only time we have (that we know of) so make it count.

Thank you so much for replying! I really appreciate it Smile
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18-11-2013, 12:19 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(18-11-2013 12:10 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  
(17-11-2013 11:54 PM)houseofcantor Wrote:  Are you kidding me? Dodgy

"Practicing atheism?" On the off chance that you actually are a high school senior, I'm gonna cap this here building pyroclastic flow of invective and ask that you rephrase the questions.

Are you kidding me? How is Gwynnies not practicing atheism?

There ain't no lack in that belief, sillies. Big Grin

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18-11-2013, 12:28 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(18-11-2013 12:19 AM)houseofcantor Wrote:  
(18-11-2013 12:10 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  Are you kidding me? How is Gwynnies not practicing atheism?

There ain't no lack in that belief, sillies. Big Grin

You make atheism so complicated. I think I'll go back to my trinity just for simplification's sake. Tongue

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

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18-11-2013, 12:32 AM (This post was last modified: 18-11-2013 12:40 AM by Logisch.)
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  Hi everyone!
I'm a senior at a high school in Chicago and I'm writing a paper about people's relationship to the sacred. We need to do a few interviews, so I was wondering if anyone wanted to answer a few questions about atheism? You don't have to answer them all. If you do answer some, thanks in advance! Smile

1. When did you fully realize your atheism, and when did you officially start practicing?

I realized when I was an atheist when I was no longer able to reconcile the contradictions of a book I believed to be true. When I realized I was just looking for reasons for it to be true, instead of caring about whether or not it was true, I decided to take a path of trying to understand things as they are. Eventually that led to be giving up my religion. I'm now an atheist. I don't think there is a "practicing" of atheism. It's simply a lack of belief in a god, a simple stance on the subject of whether or not you do or do not believe in a god. Rather difficult to practice lacking belief in something. I hope that clarifies.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  2. What made you come to the realization that you were an atheist? Why were you drawn to this philosophy?

Lack of belief is not a philosophy. It's a lack of belief in whether or not a god exists. This feels sort of like a repeat of #1. Regarding philosophy in general, I enjoy reading philosophy, but it comes from various sources and has nothing to do with being an atheist. People find motivation in all kinds of places. Philosophy in general comes from all walks of life, many places in many countries from many people all of whom had famous words. They can be motivational, others not so much. Regardless, I enjoy reading bits and pieces of various cultures, you never know what you'll learn. However again, none of that requires you to believe in a god.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  3. Many religions/beliefs have core ideals, often coming from a central doctrine. What makes up the base of your philosophy? What do you put your faith in, if not a deity?

There is no doctrine to lacking belief in a god. There is no requirement aside from lacking belief in a deity to be an atheist. This would be very much like asking someone who does not believe in a mythical creature, where they get their philosophy of disbelief in magical creatures from. The basis of what I live my life by is to be a good person, be kind to others, be open minded and to care about what is true, rather than what sounds good to me. I promised above all long ago when I became an atheist that even if the truth was difficult to swallow, that I'd hold that above confirmation bias. I do not believe that it takes a doctrine or philosophy to accomplish this. Some may call that humanist, others may call it being a good person, some may call it free thinking or being rational. Part of me wants to "put faith in humanity" but of course, sometimes that's not always easy.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  4. What is your definition of “truth”?

I think it depends on the context of what we're talking about. Facts are always changing in our reality. Things are always evolving and changing. It's difficult to put a finger on something and call it a "certain truth." - for instance, I could tell you for certain that there is gravity and I would be speaking the truth. We understand that gravity is present, we can see and understand the effects. However, if I gave you the definition of gravity by the scientific theory of gravity, given new facts which may change that theory, it could be true today and different tomorrow. That would not change gravity being present, but it would change the truth of what it is.

So to me, I would say truth would be something that is proven to be true or is in the current state of being true. However, this requires me being able to be open to things changing in light of new facts or evidence. So I would say truth is something we can know to be true in our current time and current knowledge. Knowledge is always changing, however. Flipping the question, can you ever know something to be true forever?

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  5. Does your ideology impact the way you interact with others, or the way others interact with you? Has it ever caused conflict?

To some degree. I generally do not tell people I'm an atheist. I'm open about it, and I'm proud of who I am as a person. However, I don't feel it's an incredibly important part of who I am. I am me, and I'm many things, but atheism is just one stance on one subject - god or no god. There are so many other parts of a person that make up who they are. There has been some conflict where people have stopped talking to me when they find out I'm an atheist, or they're rude to me, or start rumors, that kind of stuff. But in regards to those who are religious, I have no inherent discontent or hatred towards them. I basically feel like if a person is a good person and they do not harm myself, others, and have no intentions of causing issues or interfering in the lives of others than whatever they wish to believe is all fine and entirely their business. I only have issues with it when they feel like they need to push their agenda on my life.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  6. Where/how do you find meaning in life?

Many ways. I enjoy astronomy. I think as time has passed and I've got more and more into understanding our present reality and the universe as it currently is, probably the best moment was realizing that we're all the same stuff. My last telescope was an 8" dobsonian. One night I was out stargazing for the first time with it and I got a chance to see the Orion Nebula for the first time with my own eyes. It was one of those moments that sort of hits you. I looked at a nebula, gas, a star nursery with my own eyes and realized that the entire universe, everything in it, you and me, the stars, that nebula... it's all the same thing. I feel incredibly connected to the universe when I'm out with my telescope. It's an awesome feeling knowing that every atom in every bit of matter in the universe was at one point all from the same singularity that started the big bang. So you could call that sort of a "self portrait" if you will. It's why I never get bored of looking at the stars.

When I reflect on moments like that, it's hard for me to be mad at anyone. Hard for me to hate anything. Hard for me to feel upset or afraid. I kind of just sit and think and revel at how awesome the fact that since we came from the same stuff, that in an incredible way that you ARE the universe looking at itself. You get to be here for a very short period of time, and I would not give that up for anything. Not for a moment. Does that make it an intrinsic meaning? perhaps not. But it's awesome.

Aside from that, I spend a huge amount of time working on sports cars and sports bikes. I spend a lot of time with my wife and relatives and try to just soak it all up. I find meaning in enjoying the things around me and the time I spend with people. Those experiences are all the same thing, we're all experiencing the same thing Smile

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  7. How do you practice your ideology? Is it important for you to have a regular communal relationship with other people who share in your philosophy?

I don't have an ideology. Most of the time I'm quite a recluse. Although I do try and talk to other like minded people. One thing I've learned is that if you're in a deeply religious community, it can be hard to socialize with people. Finding like minded people is a nice feeling, you don't feel as socially isolated and at least you can reflect your thoughts and have a good conversation. I think this forum (thethinkingatheist) is one way to do that.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  8. What do you think difference is between atheism and agnosticism?

This is a fundamental misunderstanding of what they are. Atheism is the stance on whether or not a god exists. To be atheist is to not believe in a god. Theist is to believe in a god.
Gnostic is to know, agnostic is to not know or state that you can't know something. These specifically are stances on the basis of knowledge. People who say "I'm agnostic" to me are generally dodging the question, sort of an opt out. Here is why...

You can be a gnostic theist or an agnostic theist. One stance would require you to know or have absolute knowledge that a god exists. The other is to say that you believe in a god but don't know or hold the knowledge to know, or can't know that one exists.

The opposite is to be a gnostic atheist which would require you to have knowledge that a god does not exist. An agnostic atheist would require you to not know or can't know if a god exists, yet you lack belief that a god exists. This is generally the default position of most atheists, agnostic atheist. This is why I feel it is an irrelevant question, they are not quite the same thing, but do coincide with each other in a different way.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  9. How should people deal with suffering and pain in the world? How do you deal with it?

I think it depends on the person and I think it depends on the context. How do you deal with pain and suffering? I go through tough times and I go through good times. When things are tough I just push and work through it. Tomorrow is a different day, and even a bad day is better than no day at all. I think people have various ways of dealing with it. A coping mechanism if you will. Again, if you do not harm others, then however you deal with it is "your business" I suppose.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  10. What do you think happens after death?

You die. Near as I can tell that's pretty much it. However, if you want to get into the longterm bits... micro-organisms will use my body for their own energy and food and I'll essentially be recycled by the earth in which I used the matter of other organisms to sustain my own body. I suppose it's only fair. Millions of years from now, the sun will swell up, eventually heat death ensues for the solar system and if it ever goes supernova, the contents of the solar system end up becoming a star nursery and potentially more stars and planets to be used by the rest of the galaxy again. No one will be here then to know for sure how that will pan out. But if we're talking afterlife? I don't have any reason to believe in superstitions. They don't comfort me in any way. I feel like if I spend time worrying about it that it's just time wasted that I could be doing anything else. We live, we die, it happens statistically to 100% of the people on the planet, so I have to be accepting of that. That comes back to accepting things as true, even if they are difficult to swallow.

Official ordained minister of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Please pm me with prayer requests to his noodly goodness. Remember, he boiled for your sins and loves you. Carbo Diem! RAmen.
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18-11-2013, 12:35 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(18-11-2013 12:06 AM)cassie529 Wrote:  Did you want me to rephrase all the questions, or just a few?

Don't bother on my account. The questions are so skewed that answering them only serves to confirm the bias that atheism is some kind of religion. Angry

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18-11-2013, 12:35 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  ...
writing a paper about people's relationship to the sacred.
...

No need to apologise for the questions as the responses you have so far highlight the main difference between a theist (watching one of many different channels) and the atheist (who has unplugged the TV or never bought one in the first place).

That 'revelation' would make a good closing paragraph for your paper.

With regard to a 'relationship to the sacred'... simple... nothing is sacred.

(exception... for HouseofCantor where Ms G. Paltrow is sacred).

Also, wrt 6. 'Where/how do you find meaning in life?'

The word 'meaning' is abiguous but I will go for:
The purpose of life is to pass on our DNA;
The meaning of life is the experience of living;
The value of life is the legacy we leave behind.

Consider Now why does that look familiar Big Grin

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18-11-2013, 12:45 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
(18-11-2013 12:32 AM)Logisch Wrote:  
(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  Hi everyone!
I'm a senior at a high school in Chicago and I'm writing a paper about people's relationship to the sacred. We need to do a few interviews, so I was wondering if anyone wanted to answer a few questions about atheism? You don't have to answer them all. If you do answer some, thanks in advance! Smile

1. When did you fully realize your atheism, and when did you officially start practicing?

I realized when I was an atheist when I was no longer able to reconcile the contradictions of a book I believed to be true. When I realized I was just looking for reasons for it to be true, instead of caring about whether or not it was true, I decided to take a path of trying to understand things as they are. Eventually that led to be giving up my religion. I'm now an atheist. I don't think there is a "practicing" of atheism. It's simply a lack of belief in a god, a simple stance on the subject of whether or not you do or do not believe in a god. Rather difficult to practice lacking belief in something. I hope that clarifies.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  2. What made you come to the realization that you were an atheist? Why were you drawn to this philosophy?

Lack of belief is not a philosophy. It's a lack of belief in whether or not a god exists. This feels sort of like a repeat of #1. Regarding philosophy in general, I enjoy reading philosophy, but it comes from various sources and has nothing to do with being an atheist. People find motivation in all kinds of places. Philosophy in general comes from all walks of life, many places in many countries from many people all of whom had famous words. They can be motivational, others not so much. Regardless, I enjoy reading bits and pieces of various cultures, you never know what you'll learn. However again, none of that requires you to believe in a god.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  3. Many religions/beliefs have core ideals, often coming from a central doctrine. What makes up the base of your philosophy? What do you put your faith in, if not a deity?

There is no doctrine to lacking belief in a god. There is no requirement aside from lacking belief in a deity to be an atheist. This would be very much like asking someone who does not believe in a mythical creature, where they get their philosophy of disbelief in magical creatures from. The basis of what I live my life by is to be a good person, be kind to others, be open minded and to care about what is true, rather than what sounds good to me. I promised above all long ago when I became an atheist that even if the truth was difficult to swallow, that I'd hold that above confirmation bias. I do not believe that it takes a doctrine or philosophy to accomplish this. Some may call that humanist, others may call it being a good person, some may call it free thinking or being rational. Part of me wants to "put faith in humanity" but of course, sometimes that's not always easy.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  4. What is your definition of “truth”?

I think it depends on the context of what we're talking about. Facts are always changing in our reality. Things are always evolving and changing. It's difficult to put a finger on something and call it a "certain truth." - for instance, I could tell you for certain that there is gravity and I would be speaking the truth. We understand that gravity is present, we can see and understand the effects. However, if I gave you the definition of gravity by the scientific theory of gravity, given new facts which may change that theory, it could be true today and different tomorrow. That would not change gravity being present, but it would change the truth of what it is.

So to me, I would say truth would be something that is proven to be true or is in the current state of being true. However, this requires me being able to be open to things changing in light of new facts or evidence. So I would say truth is something we can know to be true in our current time and current knowledge. Knowledge is always changing, however. Flipping the question, can you ever know something to be true forever?

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  5. Does your ideology impact the way you interact with others, or the way others interact with you? Has it ever caused conflict?

To some degree. I generally do not tell people I'm an atheist. I'm open about it, and I'm proud of who I am as a person. However, I don't feel it's an incredibly important part of who I am. I am me, and I'm many things, but atheism is just one stance on one subject - god or no god. There are so many other parts of a person that make up who they are. There has been some conflict where people have stopped talking to me when they find out I'm an atheist, or they're rude to me, or start rumors, that kind of stuff. But in regards to those who are religious, I have no inherent discontent or hatred towards them. I basically feel like if a person is a good person and they do not harm myself, others, and have no intentions of causing issues or interfering in the lives of others than whatever they wish to believe is all fine and entirely their business. I only have issues with it when they feel like they need to push their agenda on my life.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  6. Where/how do you find meaning in life?

Many ways. I enjoy astronomy. I think as time has passed and I've got more and more into understanding our present reality and the universe as it currently is, probably the best moment was realizing that we're all the same stuff. My last telescope was an 8" dobsonian. One night I was out stargazing for the first time with it and I got a chance to see the Orion Nebula for the first time with my own eyes. It was one of those moments that sort of hits you. I looked at a nebula, gas, a star nursery with my own eyes and realized that the entire universe, everything in it, you and me, the stars, that nebula... it's all the same thing. I feel incredibly connected to the universe when I'm out with my telescope. It's an awesome feeling knowing that every atom in every bit of matter in the universe was at one point all from the same singularity that started the big bang. So you could call that sort of a "self portrait" if you will. It's why I never get bored of looking at the stars.

When I reflect on moments like that, it's hard for me to be mad at anyone. Hard for me to hate anything. Hard for me to feel upset or afraid. I kind of just sit and think and revel at how awesome the fact that since we came from the same stuff, that in an incredible way that you ARE the universe looking at itself. You get to be here for a very short period of time, and I would not give that up for anything. Not for a moment. Does that make it an intrinsic meaning? perhaps not. But it's awesome.

Aside from that, I spend a huge amount of time working on sports cars and sports bikes. I spend a lot of time with my wife and relatives and try to just soak it all up. I find meaning in enjoying the things around me and the time I spend with people. Those experiences are all the same thing, we're all experiencing the same thing Smile

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  7. How do you practice your ideology? Is it important for you to have a regular communal relationship with other people who share in your philosophy?

I don't have an ideology. Most of the time I'm quite a recluse. Although I do try and talk to other like minded people. One thing I've learned is that if you're in a deeply religious community, it can be hard to socialize with people. Finding like minded people is a nice feeling, you don't feel as socially isolated and at least you can reflect your thoughts and have a good conversation. I think this forum (thethinkingatheist) is one way to do that.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  8. What do you think difference is between atheism and agnosticism?

This is a fundamental misunderstanding of what they are. Atheism is the stance on whether or not a god exists. To be atheist is to not believe in a god. Theist is to believe in a god.
Gnostic is to know, agnostic is to not know or state that you can't know something. These specifically are stances on the basis of knowledge. People who say "I'm agnostic" to me are generally dodging the question, sort of an opt out. Here is why...

You can be a gnostic theist or an agnostic theist. One stance would require you to know or have absolute knowledge that a god exists. The other is to say that you believe in a god but don't know or hold the knowledge to know, or can't know that one exists.

The opposite is to be a gnostic atheist which would require you to have knowledge that a god does not exist. An agnostic atheist would require you to not know or can't know if a god exists, yet you lack belief that a god exists. This is generally the default position of most atheists, agnostic atheist. This is why I feel it is an irrelevant question, they are not quite the same thing, but do coincide with each other in a different way.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  9. How should people deal with suffering and pain in the world? How do you deal with it?

I think it depends on the person and I think it depends on the context. How do you deal with pain and suffering? I go through tough times and I go through good times. When things are tough I just push and work through it. Tomorrow is a different day, and even a bad day is better than no day at all. I think people have various ways of dealing with it. A coping mechanism if you will. Again, if you do not harm others, then however you deal with it is "your business" I suppose.

(17-11-2013 11:32 PM)cassie529 Wrote:  10. What do you think happens after death?

You die. Near as I can tell that's pretty much it. However, if you want to get into the longterm bits... micro-organisms will use my body for their own energy and food and I'll essentially be recycled by the earth in which I used the matter of other organisms to sustain my own body. I suppose it's only fair. Millions of years from now, the sun will swell up, eventually heat death ensues for the solar system and if it ever goes supernova, the contents of the solar system end up becoming a star nursery and potentially more stars and planets to be used by the rest of the galaxy again. No one will be here then to know for sure how that will pan out. But if we're talking afterlife? I don't have any reason to believe in superstitions. They don't comfort me in any way. I feel like if I spend time worrying about it that it's just time wasted that I could be doing anything else. We live, we die, it happens statistically to 100% of the people on the planet, so I have to be accepting of that. That comes back to accepting things as true, even if they are difficult to swallow.

Wow, thank you for the detailed response! I really appreciate it Smile
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18-11-2013, 12:49 AM
RE: Open Interview about atheism
No worries, I hope you find some interesting and enlightening answers on your adventure of writing your paper Smile.

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