Origin of the 7 days week.
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16-06-2012, 02:34 PM
Origin of the 7 days week.
I've read that the first known use of the 7 days week was instituted by Sargon I (king of Akkad around 2350 BC), by there's nothing on Wikipedia on the subject. Does anyone have any credible sources on this?
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16-06-2012, 02:58 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
(16-06-2012 02:34 PM)Vlad Wrote:  I've read that the first known use of the 7 days week was instituted by Sargon I (king of Akkad around 2350 BC), by there's nothing on Wikipedia on the subject. Does anyone have any credible sources on this?
The first known use of the 7 day week was by Elohim around 6000 years ago. Smartass

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16-06-2012, 03:15 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
(16-06-2012 02:58 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  
(16-06-2012 02:34 PM)Vlad Wrote:  I've read that the first known use of the 7 days week was instituted by Sargon I (king of Akkad around 2350 BC), by there's nothing on Wikipedia on the subject. Does anyone have any credible sources on this?
The first known use of the 7 day week was by Elohim around 6000 years ago. Smartass

Damn you Erxomai, I was expecting to get an actual answer :C
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16-06-2012, 06:12 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
(16-06-2012 02:34 PM)Vlad Wrote:  I've read that the first known use of the 7 days week was instituted by Sargon I (king of Akkad around 2350 BC), by there's nothing on Wikipedia on the subject. Does anyone have any credible sources on this?
http://www.hermetic.ch/cal_stud/hlwc/why_seven.htm

From that source:


It is a mistake to believe that our 7-day week has its origins in the command of the biblical YHWH, since the 7‑day week is older than the Hebrews, having been used by the Sumerians and Babylonians. Kerry Farmer remarks that "Some Historians believe that around 2350 BC Sargon I, King of Akkad, having conquered Ur and the other cities of Sumeria, instituted a seven-day week, the first to be recorded."



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven-day_week



Counting from the new moon, the Babylonians celebrated the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th as "holy-days", also called "evil days" (meaning "unsuitable" for prohibited activities). On these days officials were prohibited from various activities and common men were forbidden to "make a wish", and at least the 28th was known as a "rest-day".[citation needed] On each of them, offerings were made to a different god and goddess. Tablets from the 6th-century BC reigns of Cyrus the Great andCambyses indicate these dates were sometimes approximate. The lunation of 29 or 30 days basically contained three seven-day weeks, and a final week of eight or nine days inclusive, breaking the continuous seven-day cycle. The Babylonians additionally celebrated the 19th as a special "evil day", the "day of anger", because it was roughly the 49th day of the (preceding) month, completing a "week of weeks", with sacrifices and prohibitions.[citation needed] Reconstruction of a broken tablet seems to define the rarely attested Sapattum or Sabattum as the 15th day of the lunation: this word is cognate with Hebrew Shabbat, but is monthly rather than weekly. It is regarded as a form of Sumerian sa-bat ("mid-rest"), attested in Akkadian as um nuh libbi ("day of mid-repose").[2]
The seven-day week appears in the Creation story in the Book of Genesis, in the Hebrew Bible, where Elohim (God) is said to have created the heavens and the earth in six days and rested on the seventh (Genesis 1:1-2:3). In the Book of Exodus, the fourth of the ten commandments is to rest on the seventh day, theSabbath, which can be seen as implicating a seven-day week social institution (Exodus 20:8-11).



Frank C. Senn in his book Christian Liturgy: Catholic and Evangelical points to data suggesting evidence of an early continuous use of a seven-day week; referring to the Jews during the Babylonian Captivity in the 6th century BCE,[3] after the destruction of the Temple of Solomon. The ancient Romans traditionally used the eight-day nundinal cycle, but after the adoption of the Julian calendar, in the time of Augustus, the seven-day week came into use. For a while, the week and the nundinal cycle coexisted, but by the time the week was officially adopted by Constantine in AD 321[4] the nundinal cycle had fallen out of use. The association of the days of the week with the Sun, the Moon, and the five planets visible to the naked eye dates to the Roman era (2nd century).

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16-06-2012, 07:23 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
This is fascinating. I was under the impression that it had a biblical origin. Does this throw a wrench onto the Creation Story?

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16-06-2012, 07:32 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
(16-06-2012 07:23 PM)free2011 Wrote:  This is fascinating. I was under the impression that it had a biblical origin. Does this throw a wrench onto the Creation Story?
Modern theologists view Genesis as figurative anyway.

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16-06-2012, 07:36 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
(16-06-2012 07:23 PM)free2011 Wrote:  This is fascinating. I was under the impression that it had a biblical origin. Does this throw a wrench onto the Creation Story?
It didn't throw a wrench in the Creation Story when I was a creationist. The explanation I had on the subject was that the Jews picked up the 7 Day Calendar from the Babylonians who in turn got it from the Persians (don't really know the dates. The Akkadians certainly predate so they could be the source). But the calendar isn't necessary to believe in a 6 day creation. Just because there are 6 days of creation and a 7th day for rest doesn't mean Day 1 happened on Sunday, etc. Genesis 1 doesn't have to coincide with a calendar. But the rhythm of the weekly Sabbath would have been picked up by the Jews as a weekly reflection of the Creation Myth and Exodus (Sabbath Commandment is linked to both events).

The thing that is interesting to me, if I have correct information, is there are no celestial markers for the week. We know the length of a year by how long it takes to move around the sun. We know months from the moon. We know days from dark and light. But how did we get the week? People who keep the Sabbath use it as a "proof" that if not for God commanding the observance of Sabbath we wouldn't have a week.

But, as you point out, Vlad, a 7 day week long predates anything written in the Jewish Bible which the very first parts weren't even begun to be thought of until around 1000 BCE and not seriously edited and compiled until around the 5th Century BCE when the Jews were in Babylonian captivity and they decided to create a religion to support their national identity.

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16-06-2012, 07:39 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
(16-06-2012 07:32 PM)Vosur Wrote:  
(16-06-2012 07:23 PM)free2011 Wrote:  This is fascinating. I was under the impression that it had a biblical origin. Does this throw a wrench onto the Creation Story?
Modern theologists view Genesis as figurative anyway.
Do most theists share that same opinion that it is figurative? Hopefully they do and we're one step closer to them realizing it's all just one big mythological story.

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16-06-2012, 07:52 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
The Babylonians and Sumerians had a seven day week, and since that is where most of the mythology came from, (see James Hasting's Encyclopedia of Religion 2003), in Genesis, (the flood story and the creation myths), it may be reasonable to assume they took that over also, when they were writing Genesis in about 575 BC. I had forgotten about the Roman eight day week. Even up to the present day, there exists remnants of the Roman eight day week, in liturgical celebrations, (the Octave days), for Christmas, Easter, Pentecost etc. Seems likely it was a lunar thing .. as the cult of the moon-god was a strong influence in that time, (and is what Islam eventually sprang from).

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16-06-2012, 08:06 PM
RE: Origin of the 7 days week.
(16-06-2012 07:36 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  The thing that is interesting to me, if I have correct information, is there are no celestial markers for the week. We know the length of a year by how long it takes to move around the sun. We know months from the moon. We know days from dark and light. But how did we get the week? People who keep the Sabbath use it as a "proof" that if not for God commanding the observance of Sabbath we wouldn't have a week.
It's true that there's nothing celestial that marks a week, and the months are only somewhat aligned to the moon (obviously). Even the daytime shifts a little bit thanks to lengthening and shortening of days by season. In fact, there are a lot of arbitrary ways to make the calendar.

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