Other Deities and the days of the week.
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02-01-2015, 10:23 PM
Other Deities and the days of the week.
Here is a thought that came to mind. Something we can all point out more often to Christians, and other Abrahamic god worshipers who assert that their god is the only one, or any other similar argument for how perfect and so forth they are.
Heck, we have an entire season built around a single day of the year which is bigger than any other that is named after Jebus!

But, that something that I mentioned before is something we recognize every day. Every single day we recognize other gods existence in some small way, what they did for us, how they sacrificed themselves for us or even the evil deeds that they did. We do this almost every single day of the year and most of us do not even realize that we recognize these deities.

The Gods of Odin, Thor, Saturn, Frige, Tyr, and even the sun and moon!

In fact! I am pretty sure that somewhere in the bible that these names appear as well in some way or another!

Don't believe me?

Sunday: Old English Sunnandæg (pronounced [ˈsunnɑndæj), meaning "sun's day." This is a translation of the Latin phrase dies Solis. English, like most of the Germanic languages, preserves the original pagan/sun associations of the day. Many other European languages, including all of the Romance languages, have changed its name to the equivalent of "the Lord's day" (based on Ecclesiastical Latin dies Dominica). In both West Germanic and North Germanic mythology the Sun is personified as a goddess, Sunna/Sól.

Monday: Old English Mōnandæg (pronounced [ˈmoːnɑndæj]), meaning "Moon's day." This is based on a translation of the Latin name dies lunae. In North Germanic mythology, the Moon is personified as a god, Máni.

Tuesday: Old English Tīwesdæg (pronounced [ˈtiːwezdæj], meaning "Tiw's day." Tiw (Norse Týr) was a one-handed god associated with single combat and pledges in Norse mythology and also attested prominently in wider Germanic paganism. The name of the day is based on Latin dies Martis, "Day of Mars".

Wednesday: Old English Wōdnesdæg (pronounced [ˈwoːdnezdæj) meaning the day of the Germanic god Wodan (known as Óðinn among the North Germanic peoples), and a prominent god of the Anglo-Saxons (and other Germanic peoples) in England until about the seventh century. It is based on Latin dies Mercurii, "Day of Mercury." The connection between Mercury and Odin is more strained than the other syncretic connections.[citation needed] The usual explanation[who?] is that both Wodan and Mercury were considered psychopomps, or guides of souls after death, in their respective mythologies; both are also associated with poetic and musical inspiration.[citation needed] The Icelandic Miðviku, German Mittwoch, Low German Middeweek and Finnish keskiviikko all mean mid-week.

Thursday: Old English Þūnresdæg (pronounced [ˈθuːnrezdæj]), meaning 'Þunor's day'. Þunor means thunder or its personification, the Norse god known in Modern English as Thor. Similarly Dutch donderdag, German Donnerstag ('thunder's day'), Finnish torstai, and Scandinavian Torsdag ('Thor's day'). Thor's day corresponds to Latin dies Iovis, "day of Jupiter".

Friday: Old English Frīgedæg (pronounced [ˈfriːjedæj]), meaning the day of the Anglo-Saxon goddess Fríge. The Norse name for the planet Venus was Friggjarstjarna, 'Frigg's star'. It is based on the Latin dies Veneris, "Day of Venus."

Saturday: the only day of the week to retain its Roman origin in English, named after the Roman god Saturn associated with the Titan Cronus, father of Zeus and many Olympians. Its original Anglo-Saxon rendering was Sæturnesdæg (pronounced [ˈsæturnezdæj]). In Latin it was dies Saturni, "Day of Saturn." The Scandinavian Lørdag/Lördag deviates significantly as it has no reference to either the Norse or the Roman pantheon; it derives from old Norse laugardagr, literally "washing-day." The German Sonnabend and the Low German words Sünnavend mean "Sunday Eve", the German word Samstag derives from the name for Shabbat.

Every single day of the week, just by saying the name of the week and recognizing that name as the day of the week is a small memorial to the god it belongs to!
You are honoring that god by claiming that day of the week by that name.
So, Christians ( most of them ) who worship Sunday as a holy day is also simultaneously being a sun worshiper! Same thing goes for the God Saturn with those who's holy day is Saturday.

TGIF?! Thank god its the Frigs day? Yeah, You better thank your god for the day named after the female goddess of love! ...perhaps you know her better by the name....Venus? Of course many of these deities have other names, but they are all the same.

So, the next time you say TGIF, write down the day of the week, or wish it badly for Saturnday to get here, just remember that you are keeping the memory of other gods alive by giving them the memorial of having the day of the week named after them!


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02-01-2015, 11:25 PM
RE: Other Deities and the days of the week.
How long have there been 7 days in week? Or even just the passing of time in weeks- whether or not it was a different number?

I could understand 30 day increments based on the moon phases, but when did we move to weeks?

And I often wonder why our months don't change when the moon hits a particular point. why doesnt the month start on the full moon?


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03-01-2015, 12:22 AM
RE: Other Deities and the days of the week.
I think it's abundantly clear to me now that I've been a Saturn worshiper most of my adult life.
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03-01-2015, 12:23 AM
RE: Other Deities and the days of the week.
(02-01-2015 11:25 PM)Bows and Arrows Wrote:  How long have there been 7 days in week? ... Why doesn't the month start on the full moon?

I remember once long ago when questions like this could occupy days in a library. Looking up this sort of thing could take a week, and furnish a sense of real triumph when finally finding the answer. Funny, I don't miss those days a bit.

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03-01-2015, 01:03 AM
RE: Other Deities and the days of the week.
(03-01-2015 12:23 AM)Airportkid Wrote:  
(02-01-2015 11:25 PM)Bows and Arrows Wrote:  How long have there been 7 days in week? ... Why doesn't the month start on the full moon?

I remember once long ago when questions like this could occupy days in a library. Looking up this sort of thing could take a week, and furnish a sense of real triumph when finally finding the answer. Funny, I don't miss those days a bit.

The Answers To Everything Are Right Here

...li...brary?! Consider

I am sorry, I am not quite sure I am familiar with that word? What does it mean?


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03-01-2015, 01:44 AM
RE: Other Deities and the days of the week.
Library is the paper internet

It's a well jumbled history of names and celebrations that mix up our days. You can extend this to plenty other subjects like our months. Not all of them are gods persay, some are from celebrations, some from Gods, some from Names(Julius/July, Augustus/August.) It's a jumble and of course are current Janus is January and so forth with some other names.

Not to mention our months named after numbers are incorrectly applied. That one I believe happened all during Roman times of shifting calenders though as March was their original 1st month. Makes more sense than the month December for 10th is the 12 month and October for 8th is the 10th month. Just pointlessly altered things that aren't paid attention to

"Allow there to be a spectrum in all that you see" - Neil Degrasse Tyson
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