Other Flood Stories
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06-02-2016, 10:27 AM (This post was last modified: 06-02-2016 10:33 AM by Commonsensei.)
RE: Other Flood Stories
Hinduism is one of the oldest surviving religions. It's traditions have been traced back to 30,000 BCE. And many practices 4000 BCE. The oldest version of this tail appers around 700 BCE but like many fables it's went threw additions and renditions up to 300 BCE.

[Image: satyavrata%20Manu%20%20Matsya%20deluge.jpg]

Manu
700 BCE - 300 BCE
A Hindu Legend

Manu, the first human, found a small fish in his washwater. The fish begged protection from the larger fishes, in return for which it would save Manu. Manu kept the fish safe, transferring it to larger and larger reservoirs as it grew, eventually taking it to the ocean. The fish warned Manu of a coming deluge and told him to build a ship. When the flood rose, the fish came, and Manu tied the craft to its horn. The fish led him to a northern mountain and told Manu to tie the ship's rope to a tree to prevent it from drifting. Manu, alone of all creatures, survived. He made offerings of clarified butter, sour milk, whey, and curds. From these, a woman arose, calling herself Manu's daughter. Whatever blessings he invoked through her were granted him. Through her, he generated this race.

The great sage Manu, son of Vivasvat, practiced austere fervor. He stood on one leg with upraised arm, looking down unblinkingly, for 10,000 years. While so engaged on the banks of the Chirini, a fish came to him and asked to be saved from larger fish. Manu took the fish to a jar and, as the fish grew, from thence to a large pond, then to the river Ganga, then to the ocean. Though large, the fish was pleasant and easy to carry. Upon being released into the ocean, the fish told Manu that soon all terrestrial objects would be dissolved in the time of the purification. It told him to build a strong ship with a cable attached and to embark with the seven sages (rishis) and certain seeds, and to then watch for the fish, since the waters could not be crossed without it. Manu embarked as enjoined and thought on the fish. The fish, knowing his desire, came, and Manu fastened the ship's cable to its horn. The fish dragged the ship through roiling waters for many years, at last bringing it to the highest peak of Himavat, which is still known as Naubandhana ("the Binding of the Ship"). The fish then revealed itself as Parjapati Brahma and said Manu shall create all living things and all things moving and fixed. Manu performed a great act of austere fervor to clear his uncertainty and then began calling things into existence.

The heroic king Manu, son of the Sun, practiced austere fervor in Malaya and attained transcendent union with the Deity. After a million years, Brahma bestowed on Manu a boon and asked him to choose it. Manu asked for the power to preserve all existing things upon the dissolution of the universe. Later, while offering oblations in his hermitage, a carp fell in his hands, which Manu preserved. The fish grew and cried to Manu to preserve it, and Manu moved it to progressively larger vessels, eventually moving it to the river Ganga and then to the ocean. When it filled the ocean, Manu recognized it as the god Janardana, or Brahma. It told Manu that the end of the yuga was approaching, and soon all would be covered with water. He was to preserve all creatures and plants aboard a ship which had been prepared. It said that a hundred years of drought and famine would begin this day, which would be followed by fires from the sun and from underground that would consume the earth and the ether, destroying this world, the gods, and the planets. Seven clouds from the steam of the fire will inundate the earth, and the three worlds will be reduced to one ocean. Manu's ship alone will remain, fastened by a rope to the great fish's horn. Having announced all this, the great being vanished. The deluge occurred as stated; Janardana appeared in the form of a horned fish, and the serpent Ananta came in the form of a rope. Manu, by contemplation, drew all creatures towards him and stowed them in the ship and, after making obeisance to Janardana, attached the ship to the fish's horn with the serpent-rope.

At the end of the past kalpa, the demon Hayagriva stole the sacred books from Brahma, and the whole human race became corrupt except the seven Nishis, and especially Satyavrata, the prince of a maritime region. One day when he was bathing in a river, he was visited by a fish which craved protection and which he transferred to successively larger vessels as it grew. At last Satyavrata recognized it as the god Vishnu, "The Lord of the Universe." Vishnu told him that in seven days all the corrupt creatures will be destroyed by a deluge, but Satyavrata would be saved in a large vessel. He was told to take aboard the miraculous vessel all kinds of medicinal herbs, food esculant grains, the seven Nishis and their wives, and pairs of brute animals. After seven days, the oceans began to overflow the coasts and constant rain began flooding the earth. A large vessel floated in on the rising waters, and Satyavrata and the Nishis entered with their wives and cargo. During the deluge, Vishnu preserved the ark by again taking the form of a giant fish and tying the ark to himself with a huge sea serpent. When the waters subsided, he slew the demon who had stolen the holy books and communicated their contents to Satyavrata.

One windy day, the sea flooded the port city of Dwaravati. All its occupants perished except Krishna, an avatar of Vishnu, and his brother Balarama, who were walking in the forests of Raivataka Hill. Krishna left his brother alone. Sesha, the serpent who supports the world, withdrew his energy from Balarama; in a jet of light, Balarama's spirit entered the sea, and his body fell over. Krishna decided that tomorrow he would destroy the world for all its evils, and he went to sleep. Jara the hunter passed by, mistook Krishna's foot for the face of a stag, and shot it. The wound to Krishna's foot was slight, but Jara found Krishna dead. He had saffron robes, four arms, and a jewel on his breast. The waters still rose and soon lapped at Jara's feet. Jara felt ashamed but helpless; he left deciding never to speak of the incident.

Don't Live each day like it's your last. Live each day like you have 541 days after that one where every choice you make will have lasting implications to you and the world around you. ~ Tim Minchin
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06-02-2016, 12:23 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
Metamorphoses
1 CE
As written By: Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso)

(Editors Note: This is really heavy one for me. Metamorphoses is a poem, a very, very long poem. I wanted to take the snippet from the poem that refereed to the flood but there is just so much going on it's over welling for me. I'm going to post a short summery that I found. A complete summery link, and the accule poem. )

Jupiter, angered at the evil ways of humanity, resolved to destroy it. He was about to set the earth to burning, but considered that that might set heaven itself afire, so he decided to flood the earth instead. With Neptune's help, he caused storm and earthquake to flood everything but the summit of Parnassus, where Deucalion and his wife Pyrrha came by boat and found refuge. Recognizing their piety, Jupiter let them live and withdrew the flood. Deucalion and Pyrrha, at the advice of an oracle, repopulated the world by throwing "your mother's bones" (stones) behind them; each stone became a person. [Ovid, book 1]

Jupiter and Mercury, traveling incognito in Phrygia, begged for food and shelter, but found all doors closed to them until they received hospitality from Philemon and Baucis. The gods revealed their identity, led the couple up the mountains, and showed them the whole valley flooded, destroying all homes but the couple's, which was transformed into a marble temple. Given a wish, the couple asked to be priest and priestess of the temple, and to die together. In their extreme old age, they changed into an oak and lime tree. [Ovid, book 8]

One of the kings of Alba (named Romulus, Remulus, or Amulius Silvius), set himself up as a god equal to or superior to Jupiter. He made machines to mimic thunder and lightning, and he ordered his soldiers to drown out real thunder by beating on their shields. For his impiety, he and his house were destroyed by a thunderbolt in a fierce storm. The Alban lake rose and drowned his palace. You may still see the ruins when the lake is clear and calm. [Frazer 1993, p. 149]

Breif Summary: http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/flood-myths.html

Full Summary: http://www.shmoop.com/metamorphoses/book-1-summary.html

Metamorphoses: http://classics.mit.edu/Ovid/metam.html

Don't Live each day like it's your last. Live each day like you have 541 days after that one where every choice you make will have lasting implications to you and the world around you. ~ Tim Minchin
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09-02-2016, 03:55 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
The Muisca People migrated to south america between the years 5500 BCE - 1000 BCE. They we're nomadic and hunters. Around 1270 BCE they began to create permanent housing. Between the years 500 BCE - 800 BCE waves of migrants from the highlands began apering. It is assumed that this is the origin era of this legend. Spain had conquered their territory by 1542 CE and forced the remaining peoples to their ways of life. Today it is determined that 2,318 remain of this ancient culture.

Bochica and the Flood
800 BCE - 500 BCE
A Muisca Legend

Many moons ago, during the childhood of humanity when everything was new, the people worshipped many gods, praying for every last thing. And then one day a gray-haired man came to the land of Colombia. He came from the highlands, from a land known as Chingaza in the eastern part of that country, and he had an important message for all the people.

He was a startling sight -- tall and fierce-looking, weathered and dressed in a tunic. In his strong bronzed hand he carried a large gold scepter. His name, he told the people, was Bochica, and he wanted the people to learn how to care for themselves. And so he began to teach them. He taught them to sow their fields, and to plant and to harvest them. He taught them how to build houses, and how to weave cotton and other fibers that they learned to grow in abundance upon their land.

Bochica also taught the people about time. He explained that there was a right time for planting, a right time for harvesting, a time for the people to rejoice and celebrate, a time for hard work, a time to be born and a time to die as well. Bochica taught the people about good conduct. They must, he explained, learn to work together, and they must be kind and generous to each other and to look after those in need.

"You needn't turn to the gods for everything," Bochica told the people. "You can care for yourselves." And so the people continued to praise their gods, but they no longer waited helplessly for whatever might come. Instead, they learned to build communities and to work together. And they loved their teacher, Bochica.

Bochica married a woman known as Huythaca, and for many years, he and his wife lived together happily. Like those around them, Bochica and Huythaca cared for each other. But as she grew older, Huythaca began to wish for more time and attention from her husband. She complained that he spent too much time taking care of others. She envied the commitment he felt toward the people.

"Stay with me," she begged when he set out to help the people till the soil. "Stay with me and let the others do the work themselves. You have done enough."

But Bochica had taught the people about selflessness, about the importance of giving. He shook his head at his wife's request. "You must understand, this is the way people must live," he told her. "I must always be generous with the people."

"Be generous to me," Huythaca said. "I am your wife."

But Bochica brushed away her words and paid no attention to his wife's growing unhappiness. He was a good person, but even good people don't always see clearly. Bochica did not notice that his wife's envy was turning to anger and bitterness.

As the years passed, Huythaca's bitterness grew. She began to resent the people, and she dreamed of their destruction.

One day, when her seething fury had turned into a terrible fever, she walked to the river's edge. There she stood upon the banks and prayed. She prayed to Chibchacun, god of the waters. She prayed that he would stir the waters, that they would rise and flood the land, that even Bochica would be helpless to stop the destruction that would invade the land.

Resentful that Bochica had turned the people from the gods, Chibchacun heard Huythaca's prayer. And so he agreed to answer her prayers. He stirred the river, and the water began to rise.

The people, seeing the rising water, raced to save their animals and homes, but they were not quick enough. Soon the savannah was flooded, and with the spreading water, their homes and crops began to wash away.

With the great chiefs at his side, Bochica strode to Tequendama. He was furious at his wife, and also furious with Chibchacun, but more than fury, determination fueled him. He would save the land and the people he loved.

When he reached Tequendama, he climbed upon a rainbow. Standing above his people and above the flood, he tapped the rocks with his gold specter. To the chiefs' astonishment, the waters parted, then, slipping into new paths, finding new ways to flow. And there, at Tequendama, a waterfall formed.

The land was once again safe.

But when Bochica saw the devastation the flood had caused, his heart broke. He had saved the land, but many lives had already been lost.

Bochica grieved for those lost people as if they were his own children, and his anger toward his wife grew fiercer. That is when the people learned of Bochica's greatest powers, for he commanded that, from that day on, Chibchacun would carry the Earth upon his shoulders. And he commanded that his wife live upon the moon. To further insult his wife, he taught the people to live by a calendar based upon the movements of the sun.

Ever since that day the moon, with Huythaca living on its surface, transits the sky. When people look up, they see Huythaca in her place in the heavens, and with this sight, they remember the destruction she once caused. And they remember, too, the importance of the Earth for their survival and well-being.

Still, after all these centuries, Huythaca remains bitter. Now and then she will, in anger, cause the waters of the Earth to swell and rise. The people understand they must never ignore her, and must take notice of both sun and moon whenever they are planting their fields.
[Image: bochica-maestro-de-los-muiscas.jpg]

Don't Live each day like it's your last. Live each day like you have 541 days after that one where every choice you make will have lasting implications to you and the world around you. ~ Tim Minchin
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09-02-2016, 03:59 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
(06-02-2016 09:30 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  
(05-02-2016 04:15 PM)cjlr Wrote:  It's almost like most early human cultures (and all settled cultures) lived on coasts and on floodplains or something. Go figure!

Yup. Tigris and Euphrates anyone?

Euphrates!



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09-02-2016, 05:01 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
Graham Hancock wrote a book on the subject of floods. As far as he is concerned there were thousands of floods around the world when the last ice age ended and the sea level rose by 20 or more meters over a period of a couple of centuries. But locally there would be a universal flood that killed everything and every body except a few who got away ahead of the flood waters and some where else a few decades later would be subject to a glacier breaking thru its barriers and flooding a different civilization. Made a good case for believing that floods did destroy a few dozen civilizations that had no real connection one with another at that point in early human history.
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09-02-2016, 05:04 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
(05-02-2016 04:15 PM)cjlr Wrote:  It's almost like most early human cultures (and all settled cultures) lived on coasts and on floodplains or something. Go figure!

They still do. Most of the Population of the USA lives within 30 miles of the ocean left or right. As do most big cities in the world. London, Tokyo etc...
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09-02-2016, 06:03 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
This isn't exactly a flood story but more of a landslide -into-a river- myth. Down on the Columbia River here in Oregon is a automobile bridge that goes across the river and it's called The Bridge of the Gods. It's named after an old tribal Indian myth.

A little background. Around the year 1500 AD, so not that long ago, there was a huge landslide that filled in the Columbia River and created a landbridge that the Indians could traverse. It caused a huge flood in the surrounding area submerging a huge forest of pine trees. The Columbia River eventually broke through the landslide but created a partial landing area that the Indians fished from and caught their tasty salmon.

The legend is that " Manito, the Great Spirit, was
sympathetic (to the Klickitat Tribe) and build a stone bridge for them. This
stone bridge, called the great crossover, was so
important that Manito placed Loo-Wit, an old and
wise woman, as its guardian. The grateful People gave
it a new name, the Bridge of the Gods."

This is a photo from 1915 before the Bonneville Dam was built.

[Image: lone-fisher-sized-seufert.jpg]

You can sort of see where the river has broken through between the two land areas and spills over making a waterfall. The local Indians would build these crazy rickety ledges to fish from. More than a few met their death fishing for salmon. No matter, fish needed to be caught for survival.

After Bonneville Dam was built it completely flooded this area and submerged this vital fishing spot. The local Indians were left to fend for themselves and it was never the same again for them.

Here's the modern Bridge of the Gods. It was built in 1926 but after the Bonneville Dam was built it raised the water level so high they had to raise the bridge up several 100 feet. I can't imagine how that was done, but anyway.

[Image: bridge_washington-side2.jpg]

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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10-02-2016, 12:23 AM
RE: Other Flood Stories
Dammit!!! The last time someone made a flood thread, Q jumped in with his bullshit and the thread became 30 pages long in like a day.

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
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10-02-2016, 03:18 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
(10-02-2016 12:23 AM)The Organic Chemist Wrote:  Dammit!!! The last time someone made a flood thread, Q jumped in with his bullshit and the thread became 30 pages long in like a day.

I hope that isn't a complaint. He's been busy with Mark so he hasn't been floating around as much as he has in the past.

Don't Live each day like it's your last. Live each day like you have 541 days after that one where every choice you make will have lasting implications to you and the world around you. ~ Tim Minchin
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10-02-2016, 04:06 PM
RE: Other Flood Stories
(10-02-2016 03:18 PM)Commonsensei Wrote:  
(10-02-2016 12:23 AM)The Organic Chemist Wrote:  Dammit!!! The last time someone made a flood thread, Q jumped in with his bullshit and the thread became 30 pages long in like a day.

I hope that isn't a complaint. He's been busy with Mark so he hasn't been floating around as much as he has in the past.

No, it wasn't a complaint. It was actually more of a joke. I guess as long as Mark has him tied up, it is possible to actually have a discussion of sorts.

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
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