PTSD / similar
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24-02-2013, 07:42 AM
PTSD / similar
I noticed that there is a depression and anxiety thread, however it seemed long and I didn't want to wedge into an ongoing conversation. With that in mind, I thought perhaps there may be a few others like myself that are dealing with extreme anxiety disorders, ptsd or complex trauma. Just a suggestion as I stick my toe in the chilly waters.

~ Question everything, even that which may seem true.
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24-02-2013, 07:48 AM
RE: PTSD / similar
I heard about some interesting research this week on the subject.
Seems people respond differently, and the differences may be helpful in understanding the problem.
http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display...n-research
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/07/us/stu....html?_r=0
http://www.counselheal.com/articles/4041...r-ptsd.htm

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist
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24-02-2013, 10:06 AM
RE: PTSD / similar
(24-02-2013 07:42 AM)timclev Wrote:  I noticed that there is a depression and anxiety thread, however it seemed long and I didn't want to wedge into an ongoing conversation. With that in mind, I thought perhaps there may be a few others like myself that are dealing with extreme anxiety disorders, ptsd or complex trauma. Just a suggestion as I stick my toe in the chilly waters.


I don't have PTSD, but my husband has it. He went to Viet Nam twice. It was really rough for those vets, because they didn't have the support then, that we give now to OIF/OEF vets. Because of that, he really thought he could do it on his own through "self medication". But after 30+ years of that, he finally realized it just wasn't working. On the other hand, his doctor said that he was beyond therapy and however he seems to be dealing with that now is good enough. I think it's because my husband won't take the counseling or the meds, so whatever. He gets full disability from the VA, because his trauma is just that bad.

I feel that it's not only the individual who has PTSD, the spouse/loved ones they live with have it too.

He gets angry very easily, and we all have to stay out of his way until he calms down. He barely sleeps at night (I can count on my hand the nights where he has actually had a full-night's sleep, out of the 8 years we've been together), and when he wakes up, I wake up. He has a severe lack of trust of strangers, even family members: he'll say hi to you and everything, but it takes a whole lot to get on "aquaintance status" with him (hell, you're even lucky he said anything to you at all). I get accused of stuff I didn't even do, but I make sure to have proof so he has no reason to accuse me.

You're probably asking why I don't leave. Because he appreciates the fact that I can deal with him. And in, return I get support from him.

I just don't tell him I'm an athiest, though. He is the biggest "God Warrior" I know.

Jesus loves you, but the Devil gives you cool shit.
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24-02-2013, 10:11 AM
RE: PTSD / similar
(24-02-2013 10:06 AM)thewellkeptwoman Wrote:  
(24-02-2013 07:42 AM)timclev Wrote:  I noticed that there is a depression and anxiety thread, however it seemed long and I didn't want to wedge into an ongoing conversation. With that in mind, I thought perhaps there may be a few others like myself that are dealing with extreme anxiety disorders, ptsd or complex trauma. Just a suggestion as I stick my toe in the chilly waters.


I don't have PTSD, but my husband has it. He went to Viet Nam twice. It was really rough for those vets, because they didn't have the support then, that we give now to OIF/OEF vets. Because of that, he really thought he could do it on his own through "self medication". But after 30+ years of that, he finally realized it just wasn't working. On the other hand, his doctor said that he was beyond therapy and however he seems to be dealing with that now is good enough. I think it's because my husband won't take the counseling or the meds, so whatever. He gets full disability from the VA, because his trauma is just that bad.

I feel that it's not only the individual who has PTSD, the spouse/loved ones they live with have it too.

He gets angry very easily, and we all have to stay out of his way until he calms down. He barely sleeps at night (I can count on my hand the nights where he has actually had a full-night's sleep, out of the 8 years we've been together), and when he wakes up, I wake up. He has a severe lack of trust of strangers, even family members: he'll say hi to you and everything, but it takes a whole lot to get on "aquaintance status" with him (hell, you're even lucky he said anything to you at all). I get accused of stuff I didn't even do, but I make sure to have proof so he has no reason to accuse me.

You're probably asking why I don't leave. Because he appreciates the fact that I can deal with him. And in, return I get support from him.

I just don't tell him I'm an athiest, though. He is the biggest "God Warrior" I know.
I get the whole thing of 'family living with it'. My grampy passed it to his kid, my dad, and I'm trying to break the cycle with me. Damn difficult.

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24-02-2013, 11:37 PM
RE: PTSD / similar
My PTSD doesn't come from the military, though I do sympathize with the general reactions as they mirror my own. Mistrust and general fear of social situations is a definite part of it. I receive therapy, however, because my mind tried to send me into a catatonic state, so I've no choice in the matter - though I think anyone suffering from ptsd should seek therapy, otherwise there isn't such a thing as "just getting better over time" or it going away. It is pure and simple brain damage caused from extreme trauma and anxiety.

~ Question everything, even that which may seem true.
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02-03-2013, 02:21 AM
RE: PTSD / similar
The atypical antipsychotic Seroquel regularly prescribed for PTSD has proven quite useful to me. Especially for sleep. Your mileage may vary.

Breathing - it's more art than science.
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02-03-2013, 09:37 AM
RE: PTSD / similar
(02-03-2013 02:21 AM)GirlyMan Wrote:  The atypical antipsychotic Seroquel regularly prescribed for PTSD has proven quite useful to me. Especially for sleep. Your mileage may vary.

Maybe I could CASUALLY suggest it. He doesn't like meds, and he said he'll never go back to self-medicating!

Jesus loves you, but the Devil gives you cool shit.
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