PTSD
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28-07-2013, 05:00 PM
RE: PTSD
Wish I had the answer as I would use it now. I seldom break...but I can bend no further and I feel the splintering. Old wounds torn open, reminders of times long past. Unsteady, unclear, and adrift.

Feel better soon Cheap. And hopefully me too...it's not much help but you aren't alone.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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28-07-2013, 05:06 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 04:35 PM)cheapthrillseaker Wrote:  
(28-07-2013 04:22 PM)bemore Wrote:  I hope something here may help you out. Heart

(I was thinking more halfway down the link, the resources at the top are worksheets)

http://www.getselfhelp.co.uk/freedownloads2.htm

HA! I was thinking of trying that. I think though I would need a therapist (good fucking luck, it's insane trying to get one where I am) who is qualified for helping with PTSD.

(28-07-2013 04:24 PM)Dom Wrote:  It would be best to seek treatment.

Let me clarify - you are talking about PTSD related to your family?

If so, there are things you can do to control it...

I'll try my best to reply to that: abuse from family now has me acting wonky to those who aren't my family.

What ways? Currently it's fight then flight. And the fight in me lasts longer now and is more intense.

Seen here a depiction of my shit, in the form of three Hermit Crabs. I'm the one in the middle.
[Image: hermit-crab-o.gif]

Ok, treatment is still best, doing it yourself is way harder. Having a neutral person guide you is much easier and quicker and more thorough.

That said, I did conquer mine about 95% worth on my own, but some very specific triggers still hit the spot.

It's going to take a lot of effort. You are going to have to watch yourself react and even take notes.

The hardest part is recognizing the actual triggers. Wording, a person's attitude, mannerisms - they can all be triggers, and there are likely more types of triggers that I personally just didn't have.

It sounds like yours triggers anger - that's actually way preferable to fear. It's easier to control.

So let's say, just as an off the wall example, you get triggered by a lady using her hand to brush hair out of her face.

The minute you recognize that this is the exact moment that starts that feeling in your stomach that precedes an outburst, you win. Finding all the triggers is the hardest thing.

Write the trigger down. Put a list of them in your bathroom or any place where you will spend some idle time daily, and always look at it. At least once a day.

Your brain will learn to alarm the rational you when the trigger happens again. You will feel like you are a third person there, saying - "oops, there it is, the trigger". When that happens, the trigger has lost it's power. You will be in perfect control.

The control part is actually the easy part. It happens just from knowing what exactly the trigger is.

There are likely several triggers, you need to find them and familiarize yourself with them. You don't go back into the trauma for that, it does not need to be touched at all. You just go into present day situations where you got triggered and isolate the one little thing that was the catalyst. The trigger is NOT the emotion itself, it is what causes the emotion. It is one little thing, and most likely it will happen to you several more times before you can isolate it properly.

This is what I learned in a self help group, and it worked for me and others.

It is a very simple form of therapy and ignores all the underlying causes (like why do I get triggered by this). It just fixes behavior. Give it a shot, but if you can, get a behavioral therapist instead, or ask Lady Jane for more info on the type of therapy out there...

[Image: dobie.png]

Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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28-07-2013, 05:13 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 04:55 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  
(28-07-2013 04:35 PM)cheapthrillseaker Wrote:  HA! I was thinking of trying that. I think though I would need a therapist (good fucking luck, it's insane trying to get one where I am) who is qualified for helping with PTSD.


I'll try my best to reply to that: abuse from family now has me acting wonky to those who aren't my family.

What ways? Currently it's fight then flight. And the fight in me lasts longer now and is more intense.

Seen here a depiction of my shit, in the form of three Hermit Crabs. I'm the one in the middle.
[Image: hermit-crab-o.gif]

Yes...it can be quite intense and even irrational because deep down it feels stupid. That's the way I felt just recently.

Therapy will hopefully be very helpful -- relearning coping skills I thought I no longer needed.
Oh hells yes, mum, you hit the nail on the head about it feeling stupid. It was a few hours this went on. I was asking myself why I was going on about it, that it was so stupid and why was I dragging it on and then the emotions hit me again and then hopped the caboose as if it had just happened and kept on going. I'm at the point where I recognize the root of the PTSD (my own mother and the truckload of nails on chalkboard with her from the past) but it's only after it happens.

It's an ambush predator of my own mind. What sucks is that whatever situation, and whomever it happens with, it's not the other persons fault. I don't know if it's mine, either. Well, at least now recognizing the problem it will be my fault if I don't try to seek help for it.

With your previous post even though what you said I go through, I didn't know it was linked to that. I've had to reach out to a few helplines in the past when the panic struck, but now it's scary to know this, because this shit doesn't just show up with stuff easily identified. Last time the "danger moment" wasn't even about anything I could point to from my past. It just was fear and crying and not being able to calm the fuck down until a woman on the other end of the phone talked me the hell down and got me to breathe.

This is mental.

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28-07-2013, 05:24 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 05:00 PM)Anjele Wrote:  Wish I had the answer as I would use it now. I seldom break...but I can bend no further and I feel the splintering. Old wounds torn open, reminders of times long past. Unsteady, unclear, and adrift.

Feel better soon Cheap. And hopefully me too...it's not much help but you aren't alone.
I think Dom posted some taters and carrots to go with whatever meat you would chose afterwards. I'm gonna give it a shot.

Hug

(28-07-2013 05:06 PM)Dom Wrote:  Ok, treatment is still best, doing it yourself is way harder. Having a neutral person guide you is much easier and quicker and more thorough.

That said, I did conquer mine about 95% worth on my own, but some very specific triggers still hit the spot.

It's going to take a lot of effort. You are going to have to watch yourself react and even take notes.

The hardest part is recognizing the actual triggers. Wording, a person's attitude, mannerisms - they can all be triggers, and there are likely more types of triggers that I personally just didn't have.

It sounds like yours triggers anger - that's actually way preferable to fear. It's easier to control.

So let's say, just as an off the wall example, you get triggered by a lady using her hand to brush hair out of her face.

The minute you recognize that this is the exact moment that starts that feeling in your stomach that precedes an outburst, you win. Finding all the triggers is the hardest thing.

Write the trigger down. Put a list of them in your bathroom or any place where you will spend some idle time daily, and always look at it. At least once a day.

Your brain will learn to alarm the rational you when the trigger happens again. You will feel like you are a third person there, saying - "oops, there it is, the trigger". When that happens, the trigger has lost it's power. You will be in perfect control.

The control part is actually the easy part. It happens just from knowing what exactly the trigger is.

There are likely several triggers, you need to find them and familiarize yourself with them. You don't go back into the trauma for that, it does not need to be touched at all. You just go into present day situations where you got triggered and isolate the one little thing that was the catalyst. The trigger is NOT the emotion itself, it is what causes the emotion. It is one little thing, and most likely it will happen to you several more times before you can isolate it properly.

This is what I learned in a self help group, and it worked for me and others.

It is a very simple form of therapy and ignores all the underlying causes (like why do I get triggered by this). It just fixes behavior. Give it a shot, but if you can, get a behavioral therapist instead, or ask Lady Jane for more info on the type of therapy out there...
I think I'll be getting a guide.

The anger part I think is worse off in the long run, even if the panic mode is more unbearable during the time it happens. I don't know if it's related to the TS I got, but I do know Tourette can affect how emotions are felt, and anger tends to be its go-to if I feel threatened.

I've identified what the trigger is for today's episode. Since the action that triggers it isn't my own, would telling the person help or make worse? I don't want to control how others react or act around me, but would letting them know at least have them understand that it wasn't them so that if they're aware, maybe to help me get through it? I really don't know. Huh

[Image: 3d366d5c-72a0-4228-b835-f404c2970188_zps...1381867723]
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28-07-2013, 05:35 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 05:24 PM)cheapthrillseaker Wrote:  
(28-07-2013 05:00 PM)Anjele Wrote:  Wish I had the answer as I would use it now. I seldom break...but I can bend no further and I feel the splintering. Old wounds torn open, reminders of times long past. Unsteady, unclear, and adrift.

Feel better soon Cheap. And hopefully me too...it's not much help but you aren't alone.
I think Dom posted some taters and carrots to go with whatever meat you would chose afterwards. I'm gonna give it a shot.

Hug

(28-07-2013 05:06 PM)Dom Wrote:  Ok, treatment is still best, doing it yourself is way harder. Having a neutral person guide you is much easier and quicker and more thorough.

That said, I did conquer mine about 95% worth on my own, but some very specific triggers still hit the spot.

It's going to take a lot of effort. You are going to have to watch yourself react and even take notes.

The hardest part is recognizing the actual triggers. Wording, a person's attitude, mannerisms - they can all be triggers, and there are likely more types of triggers that I personally just didn't have.

It sounds like yours triggers anger - that's actually way preferable to fear. It's easier to control.

So let's say, just as an off the wall example, you get triggered by a lady using her hand to brush hair out of her face.

The minute you recognize that this is the exact moment that starts that feeling in your stomach that precedes an outburst, you win. Finding all the triggers is the hardest thing.

Write the trigger down. Put a list of them in your bathroom or any place where you will spend some idle time daily, and always look at it. At least once a day.

Your brain will learn to alarm the rational you when the trigger happens again. You will feel like you are a third person there, saying - "oops, there it is, the trigger". When that happens, the trigger has lost it's power. You will be in perfect control.

The control part is actually the easy part. It happens just from knowing what exactly the trigger is.

There are likely several triggers, you need to find them and familiarize yourself with them. You don't go back into the trauma for that, it does not need to be touched at all. You just go into present day situations where you got triggered and isolate the one little thing that was the catalyst. The trigger is NOT the emotion itself, it is what causes the emotion. It is one little thing, and most likely it will happen to you several more times before you can isolate it properly.

This is what I learned in a self help group, and it worked for me and others.

It is a very simple form of therapy and ignores all the underlying causes (like why do I get triggered by this). It just fixes behavior. Give it a shot, but if you can, get a behavioral therapist instead, or ask Lady Jane for more info on the type of therapy out there...
I think I'll be getting a guide.

The anger part I think is worse off in the long run, even if the panic mode is more unbearable during the time it happens. I don't know if it's related to the TS I got, but I do know Tourette can affect how emotions are felt, and anger tends to be its go-to if I feel threatened.

I've identified what the trigger is for today's episode. Since the action that triggers it isn't my own, would telling the person help or make worse? I don't want to control how others react or act around me, but would letting them know at least have them understand that it wasn't them so that if they're aware, maybe to help me get through it? I really don't know. Huh

Opening up about what happened to you -- in a safe way can be soooo beneficial. It really helped me to say what happened (a small part of it) but it also allowed me to Frame it. If you think the person who triggered you would be empathetic to your feelings and they truly care about you -- they would really want to know.

I spent a couple weeks just yelling and snapping at everyone - it's taken me weeks to just feel that I can move forward.


God is a concept by which we measure our pain -- John Lennon

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28-07-2013, 05:37 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 05:24 PM)cheapthrillseaker Wrote:  
(28-07-2013 05:00 PM)Anjele Wrote:  Wish I had the answer as I would use it now. I seldom break...but I can bend no further and I feel the splintering. Old wounds torn open, reminders of times long past. Unsteady, unclear, and adrift.

Feel better soon Cheap. And hopefully me too...it's not much help but you aren't alone.
I think Dom posted some taters and carrots to go with whatever meat you would chose afterwards. I'm gonna give it a shot.

Hug

(28-07-2013 05:06 PM)Dom Wrote:  Ok, treatment is still best, doing it yourself is way harder. Having a neutral person guide you is much easier and quicker and more thorough.

That said, I did conquer mine about 95% worth on my own, but some very specific triggers still hit the spot.

It's going to take a lot of effort. You are going to have to watch yourself react and even take notes.

The hardest part is recognizing the actual triggers. Wording, a person's attitude, mannerisms - they can all be triggers, and there are likely more types of triggers that I personally just didn't have.

It sounds like yours triggers anger - that's actually way preferable to fear. It's easier to control.

So let's say, just as an off the wall example, you get triggered by a lady using her hand to brush hair out of her face.

The minute you recognize that this is the exact moment that starts that feeling in your stomach that precedes an outburst, you win. Finding all the triggers is the hardest thing.

Write the trigger down. Put a list of them in your bathroom or any place where you will spend some idle time daily, and always look at it. At least once a day.

Your brain will learn to alarm the rational you when the trigger happens again. You will feel like you are a third person there, saying - "oops, there it is, the trigger". When that happens, the trigger has lost it's power. You will be in perfect control.

The control part is actually the easy part. It happens just from knowing what exactly the trigger is.

There are likely several triggers, you need to find them and familiarize yourself with them. You don't go back into the trauma for that, it does not need to be touched at all. You just go into present day situations where you got triggered and isolate the one little thing that was the catalyst. The trigger is NOT the emotion itself, it is what causes the emotion. It is one little thing, and most likely it will happen to you several more times before you can isolate it properly.

This is what I learned in a self help group, and it worked for me and others.

It is a very simple form of therapy and ignores all the underlying causes (like why do I get triggered by this). It just fixes behavior. Give it a shot, but if you can, get a behavioral therapist instead, or ask Lady Jane for more info on the type of therapy out there...
I think I'll be getting a guide.

The anger part I think is worse off in the long run, even if the panic mode is more unbearable during the time it happens. I don't know if it's related to the TS I got, but I do know Tourette can affect how emotions are felt, and anger tends to be its go-to if I feel threatened.

I've identified what the trigger is for today's episode. Since the action that triggers it isn't my own, would telling the person help or make worse? I don't want to control how others react or act around me, but would letting them know at least have them understand that it wasn't them so that if they're aware, maybe to help me get through it? I really don't know. Huh

You could apologize in a general way and say you will be working on your anger. You don't need to give details, it's your issue, regardless of who pulled the trigger. You reacted to it the way you did. It's your responsibility to fix it.

Now you need to make sure that you think about that trigger daily, so it ends up tops in your brain. Not to analyse it or anything, more like a rote remembering. xxx is the trigger. That's all you need to do. xxx is the trigger. Burn it into your brain. Again and again. Repetition, mindless repetition. xxx is the trigger. If you live alone, put some stickers around the place. xxx is the trigger.

If you are correct and it really is the trigger, and you do put it in front of your mind daily for a while, you will be in control when it happens again. Just like that. Your brain will pop up and take control.

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Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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28-07-2013, 05:44 PM
RE: PTSD
[Image: break_zps72ac46bd.jpg]

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28-07-2013, 05:46 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 05:44 PM)Anjele Wrote:  [Image: break_zps72ac46bd.jpg]

Hug Hug Hug

[Image: dobie.png]

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28-07-2013, 05:53 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 05:35 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  Opening up about what happened to you -- in a safe way can be soooo beneficial. It really helped me to say what happened (a small part of it) but it also allowed me to Frame it. If you think the person who triggered you would be empathetic to your feelings and they truly care about you -- they would really want to know.

I spent a couple weeks just yelling and snapping at everyone - it's taken me weeks to just feel that I can move forward.

Safe timing being key. After the dust has settled. I thought earlier I could sort of, and well, it blew up in my face and I had to drop everything as I didn't want to go through that shit all over again. Weeks, eh? Well buckle up buckaroos! I think this thread is gonna see more of me. Dodgy

(28-07-2013 05:37 PM)Dom Wrote:  You could apologize in a general way and say you will be working on your anger. You don't need to give details, it's your issue, regardless of who pulled the trigger. You reacted to it the way you did. It's your responsibility to fix it.

Now you need to make sure that you think about that trigger daily, so it ends up tops in your brain. Not to analyse it or anything, more like a rote remembering. xxx is the trigger. That's all you need to do. xxx is the trigger. Burn it into your brain. Again and again. Repetition, mindless repetition. xxx is the trigger. If you live alone, put some stickers around the place. xxx is the trigger.

If you are correct and it really is the trigger, and you do put it in front of your mind daily for a while, you will be in control when it happens again. Just like that. Your brain will pop up and take control.

Yeah, I gotta fix it. I think the dust has settled, in this instance. Thinking of the trigger is probably gonna be the hardest part as I analyze things to death, as OCD is wont to do.

I don't like coming out on message boards but I still do. A lot of people get the wrong impression of my character before this stuff gets posted and quite frankly I'd rather it stay the way it was. I'm not always the joker. I'm not always the one who tries to stay neutral. I'm just like everyone else; mild quirks to outrageous jerks and the stuff in between is what I strive for.

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28-07-2013, 05:54 PM
RE: PTSD
(28-07-2013 05:13 PM)cheapthrillseaker Wrote:  
(28-07-2013 04:55 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  Yes...it can be quite intense and even irrational because deep down it feels stupid. That's the way I felt just recently.

Therapy will hopefully be very helpful -- relearning coping skills I thought I no longer needed.
Oh hells yes, mum, you hit the nail on the head about it feeling stupid. It was a few hours this went on. I was asking myself why I was going on about it, that it was so stupid and why was I dragging it on and then the emotions hit me again and then hopped the caboose as if it had just happened and kept on going. I'm at the point where I recognize the root of the PTSD (my own mother and the truckload of nails on chalkboard with her from the past) but it's only after it happens.

It's an ambush predator of my own mind. What sucks is that whatever situation, and whomever it happens with, it's not the other persons fault. I don't know if it's mine, either. Well, at least now recognizing the problem it will be my fault if I don't try to seek help for it.

With your previous post even though what you said I go through, I didn't know it was linked to that. I've had to reach out to a few helplines in the past when the panic struck, but now it's scary to know this, because this shit doesn't just show up with stuff easily identified. Last time the "danger moment" wasn't even about anything I could point to from my past. It just was fear and crying and not being able to calm the fuck down until a woman on the other end of the phone talked me the hell down and got me to breathe.

This is mental.

Hug

When I was triggered -- I felt so angry and annoyed with myself. I was blindsided -- my guard was down. I just wanted curl up into a ball and cry -- in fact I did that a lot.

I also did a good deal of self medicating with alcohol which wasn't too smart. That's the messed up part -- when asked what bothered me -- I couldn't effectively explain it. It's emotional -- it was for me a feeling that I was helpless. Forced helplessness. It was at that moment beyond my power to stop it.

Talking it out with my husband and allowing him to for lack of a better word protect me -- helped me a lot. Which now just means checking in, being a little gentle.

He does get kinda papa bear with me when I get all tight like that.

He also encouraged me to get safely angry with him and talk freely about anything on my mind.


God is a concept by which we measure our pain -- John Lennon

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