Paleo story of the week
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Votes - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
27-05-2013, 05:01 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(25-05-2013 06:22 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Cosmic impact killed all the megafauna in North America 12,800 years ago

http://phys.org/news/2013-05-comprehensi...heory.html

So that's what happened to the Sabre-tooth cat and the Clovis point makers.

Now we need an impact site. Barringer Crater in Arizona is thought to be 50,000 years old, so it's not a likely candidate. It may also be too small.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
27-05-2013, 05:58 AM (This post was last modified: 27-05-2013 06:02 AM by Full Circle.)
RE: Paleo story of the week
(27-05-2013 05:01 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(25-05-2013 06:22 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Cosmic impact killed all the megafauna in North America 12,800 years ago

http://phys.org/news/2013-05-comprehensi...heory.html

So that's what happened to the Sabre-tooth cat and the Clovis point makers.

Now we need an impact site. Barringer Crater in Arizona is thought to be 50,000 years old, so it's not a likely candidate. It may also be too small.

The area affected is so enormous where do you even begin to look? With all our satellite imaging covering the earth's surface you would think that anything obvious would have already been identified. One thought that crosses my mind is a meteor shower with multiple smaller impacts not readily obvious as proposed by Clube and Napier.

The research paper link is below, they mention an impact event but not any indication as to the where or size.

"Extraterrestrial (ET) catastrophes also have been proposed. For example, LaViolette suggested that a large explosion in our galactic core led to the extinctions. Brakenridge postulated that a supernova killed the megafauna and caused the worldwide deposition of the black layer. Clube and Napier proposed multiple encounters with remnants of the mega comet progenitor of the Taurid meteor stream and Comet Encke. Although ET events have long been proposed as a trigger for mass extinctions, such as at the K/T (≈65 Ma) and P/T (≈250 Ma), there has been no compelling evidence linking impacts to the late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions and YD cooling."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1994902/

ABSTRACT
A carbon-rich black layer, dating to ≈12.9 ka, has been previously identified at ≈50 Clovis-age sites across North America and appears contemporaneous with the abrupt onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling. The in situ bones of extinct Pleistocene megafauna, along with Clovis tool assemblages, occur below this black layer but not within or above it. Causes for the extinctions, YD cooling, and termination of Clovis culture have long been controversial. In this paper, we provide evidence for an extraterrestrial (ET) impact event at 12.9 ka, which we hypothesize caused abrupt environmental changes that contributed to YD cooling, major ecological reorganization, broad-scale extinctions, and rapid human behavioral shifts at the end of the Clovis Period.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
29-05-2013, 01:36 PM
RE: Paleo story of the week
We have Mammoth blood! Let the cloning begin!

http://phys.org/news/2013-05-russian-sci...mmoth.html

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Full Circle's post
10-06-2013, 10:45 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
I once spent a day digging up Eocene fish fossils in the Green River Wyoming area, very interesting. I'd chip out a piece of sandstone, look at the edge for any dark coloration, if there was any then I'd carefully tap the chisel there and it normally would open to reveal a fossilized fish!

Wish I would have found this horse instead!

http://www.livescience.com/37276-lost-wo...pid=527272

BTW I sure feel lonely on this thread, where is TheBeardedDude?

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-06-2013, 11:01 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(10-06-2013 10:45 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  I once spent a day digging up Eocene fish fossils in the Green River Wyoming area, very interesting. I'd chip out a piece of sandstone, look at the edge for any dark coloration, if there was any then I'd carefully tap the chisel there and it normally would open to reveal a fossilized fish!

Wish I would have found this horse instead!

http://www.livescience.com/37276-lost-wo...pid=527272

BTW I sure feel lonely on this thread, where is TheBeardedDude?

That's cool stuff. Cincinnati is a fossil hotbed for early aquatic life. I've never went to any of the dig sites, though. This summer I hope to visit the fossil museum in Gray, TN. They have primarily mammals from the Miocene. I would like to specialize in Miocene primates in grad school. This means I'll definitely have to do my fair share of digging too.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes ghostexorcist's post
10-06-2013, 11:24 AM
Re: Paleo story of the week
I'm around. I have been happy to see other people posting some fossil-related information for the last few weeks without any need for prodding from me.

As for Wyoming, some of the earliest fossils for horse fossils are out that way. There is a formation (the name escapes me at the moment) that is red and white striped like a candy-cane where the fossils came out of. Very cool. The Green River Fm is fantastic, but I have never had the privilege of collecting from it. I have however collected numerous belemnites from the Sundance Fm (the Sundance sea in the Triassic) and some gastroliths from the Morrison/Cloverly Fm (Jurassic). These are both vast in the Central-Western WY and the Morrison is famous all across the West for dinosaurs.

I have never been to the Gray fossil site in East Tennessee , but I know of it. There is a place in western (kind of central) Tennessee near Parsons, TN called the Coon Creek Fm, which is Creteacous. You can get shells that still have the original nacre on them and the occasional crab or ammonite with a mesosaur tooth mark on it (mesosaur remains too!). I don't know how easy it is to collect in it without permission from Michael Gibson at UT-Martin though. There is also a quarry of Devonian rocks (the Ross Fm) near Parsons where you can get bryozoans, brachiopods, and nautiloids. The cool thing about these rocks is that some of the limestone is green from glauconite (a mineral derived from fecal pellets). That quarry may allow you to collect in some sections if you sign a waiver of liability. It would help to have some university affiliation, but they may not care. Some of that stuff may be scattered along the road and there may be outcrops. But that is 5-6 hours away from Chattanooga, so even further from the Grey fossil site.

Being nice is something stupid people do to hedge their bets
-Rick
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes TheBeardedDude's post
10-06-2013, 11:46 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(10-06-2013 11:01 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(10-06-2013 10:45 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  I once spent a day digging up Eocene fish fossils in the Green River Wyoming area, very interesting. I'd chip out a piece of sandstone, look at the edge for any dark coloration, if there was any then I'd carefully tap the chisel there and it normally would open to reveal a fossilized fish!

Wish I would have found this horse instead!

http://www.livescience.com/37276-lost-wo...pid=527272

BTW I sure feel lonely on this thread, where is TheBeardedDude?

That's cool stuff. Cincinnati is a fossil hotbed for early aquatic life. I've never went to any of the dig sites, though. This summer I hope to visit the fossil museum in Gray, TN. They have primarily mammals from the Miocene. I would like to specialize in Miocene primates in grad school. This means I'll definitely have to do my fair share of digging too.

That's interesting that you would mention Cincinnati, I live there for four years and spent a great deal of time searching river beds. I have a box full of really cool fossils from there!

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Full Circle's post
10-06-2013, 12:52 PM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(10-06-2013 11:46 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  That's interesting that you would mention Cincinnati, I live there for four years and spent a great deal of time searching river beds. I have a box full of really cool fossils from there!

Awesome. There are a couple of books that have been written on the subject. This one is the most recent:

http://www.amazon.com/Sea-without-Fish-O...ti+fossils

I just found an AIG page that mentions all of the Cincinnati fossils were deposited by...GASP...the great flood!

http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles...ti-fossils
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes ghostexorcist's post
10-06-2013, 04:26 PM
RE: Paleo story of the week
This Knightia I purchased from the land owner since I didn't find any specimens that beautiful.

[attachment=1417]

@ghostex - the Great Flood huh? Frusty

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Full Circle's post
10-06-2013, 08:37 PM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(10-06-2013 04:26 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  This Knightia I purchased from the land owner since I didn't find any specimens that beautiful.

@ghostex - the Great Flood huh? Frusty

That is gorgeous.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: