Paleo story of the week
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11-09-2012, 08:44 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...154314.htm

A one two punch for the dinosaurs is explored yet again. Of course it could be that the initial extinction had no real impact on the dinosaurs or marine reptiles and is therefore only relevant to the invertebrates (it could have been selective of organisms that made shells of calcite and/or aragonite).

My advisor also cautions that Peter Ward is a bit of a "media-whore" and that should be a bit of a warning too.

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11-09-2012, 08:51 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(08-09-2012 03:11 PM)kim Wrote:  
(05-09-2012 09:57 AM)Chas Wrote:  Cool, they may have found an ancestor of Northern Europeans in Spain.

7,000 year-old human DNA

Quote:The cavemen lived during the Mesolithic period and were hunter-gatherers, as determined by an ornament one of the skeletons was holding.

Huh? What does that mean - an ornament? Wouldn't it be more indicative of hunting-gathering if he were holding a tool or a weapon? I wish this wasn't such a tease... now I really want to see this "ornament". Shy

Maybe they are misinterpreting the object Consider maybe he was holding an iPod. A primitive one, of course. Wink

I believe it was an iFlint. Yes

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11-09-2012, 01:45 PM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(08-09-2012 03:11 PM)kim Wrote:  Huh? What does that mean - an ornament? Wouldn't it be more indicative of hunting-gathering if he were holding a tool or a weapon? I wish this wasn't such a tease... now I really want to see this "ornament". Shy

[...]

Another article says it was "red-deer canines embroidered onto a cloth."
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13-09-2012, 12:54 PM
RE: Paleo story of the week
315 Million year old amphibian tracks. Sweet

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...125108.htm

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16-09-2012, 10:25 PM
RE: Paleo story of the week
(11-09-2012 01:45 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  Another article says it was "red-deer canines embroidered onto a cloth."

Ornamentation is simple but, textiles... weaving's quite a sophisticated process. I'm loving these cave dudes - they're going places. Thumbsup

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25-09-2012, 09:07 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
Several articles this week. One of which I will have to keep an eye on because the conclusions seem a little shaky to me at the moment.

First, a giant salamander from around the Paleocene-Eocene boundary that was capable of hunting on land.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...082524.htm

Next, a CT scan of a monoplacophoran shows its relationship to modern chitons. This is important because understanding the early evolutionary history or molluscs is not all that straightforward, so any advancement helps
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...125742.htm

This last one is the one that is a bit shaky, but has some serious potential to be important. First off, I do not know how well the ages of the rocks in Australia they are sampling from are constrained. Some of those ages are a bit suspect to be perfectly honest. Secondly, the authors are inferring terrestrial life from marine sediments. That is not necessarily itself shaky, but it is only chemical evidence using mainly sulfur and molybdenum isotopes. Molybdenum isotopes are an area I know really nothing of and are a rather new technique, but indicate something about oxygen levels. Take that with a grain of salt is all I'm saying.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...101741.htm

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26-09-2012, 06:47 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
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26-09-2012, 08:03 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
I have that pic hanging up on my office door.

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02-10-2012, 09:56 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2...082212.php

This is amazing if it holds up to speculation. Fossils like Wiwaxia have been very troubling for taxonomists for quite some time. This may link them directly to molluscs. Quite fascinating.

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10-10-2012, 08:12 AM
RE: Paleo story of the week
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...134523.htm
Amber is already freaking sweet, but this is an Orb Weaver spider moving in to kill a parasitic wasp frozen in time. Need I say more?

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