First Post Last Post
Paleo story of the week
The first article here is about a large avian fossil.
http://news.discovery.com/animals/bird-l...10809.html
This article sheds new light on the reproductive strategies of marine reptiles.
http://news.discovery.com/animals/plesio...10811.html

I thought I might try to start a thread I can update weekly with some of the latest and greatest news in paleontology. Most of the news always seems to be associated with Dinosaurs and the Cretaceous (as the two articles I am posting for today) but I do occasionally find some Cambrian stuff as well (http://news.discovery.com/animals/armore...225.html). That article is really neat and has serious implications for the evolutionary history of arthropods (insects, crustaceans, etc). Anyways I will keep a lookout for some new and interesting stories in the wonderful world of yesterday (er yestereon? yesterperiod? from a long time ago!).
Like Post Quote
It is that time of the week again. PALEO STORY OF THE WEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEK!

This week's story is of serious significance to the origin of life on Earth. The hypothesized origin of life is currently around 3.0 billion years ago with the oldest known fossils at around 2.2 billion years old. These fossils are from Australia and are dated at 3.4 BILLION YEARS OLD! This would push back the origin of life to close to 4.0 billion years ago! Pretty freaking sweet!

http://news.discovery.com/space/microfos...10821.html
Like Post Quote
This is a great idea! Plus, TheBeardedDude has agreed to keep up with a weekly story (or at least close to it). I am going to make this thread a sticky since it's not the type that gets a lot of responses (more of a reading thread than a discussion one sometimes) and I'd like to see it stay at the top of the forum.


Thanks for contributing TheBeardedDude!!
Like Post Quote
Nice find TheBeardedDude. The fact that life existed here that long ago is amazing. I think they will eventually find fossils from even earlier than that. This planet and the organisms that live here never cease to amaze me. Good idea making this thread a sticky stark.
Like Post Quote
(22-08-2011 04:06 PM)FSM_scot Wrote:  Nice find TheBeardedDude. The fact that life existed here that long ago is amazing. I think they will eventually find fossils from even earlier than that. This planet and the organisms that live here never cease to amaze me. Good idea making this thread a sticky stark.

And a colleague of mine made me aware of this. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v38...055a0.html

This is just isotopic evidence so it is a little more difficult to wrap your head around but hints at life back as far as ~4Ga.
Like Post Quote
http://news.discovery.com/animals/jurama...10824.html

Going to go ahead and post this tonight. It is potentially the predecessor to all placental mammals. Key word being potentially. It may be a sister taxa instead. Either way it is a mammal that is not yet a placental mammal and perhaps even more important it continues to show how mammals were an important part of the Mesozoic ecosystem for quite a long time rather than just an unimportant side group that radiated after the extinction of the Dinosaurs.
Like Post Quote
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/27...11109.html

This is a little older but it changes how we view Archaeopteryx. This new classification changes it from bird to non-avian dinosaur. The line between avian and non-avian dinosaur is already blurry but this is pretty important.
Like Post Quote
(05-09-2011 12:29 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  ...This new classification changes i...
[Image: train_wreck.jpg]
Like Post Quote
lol. Haven't seen that dude on here in a while.
Like Post Quote
...which I'm perfectly happy with...
Like Post Quote



Return to Top The Thinking Atheist - Home