Palilalia
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05-04-2015, 09:33 PM (This post was last modified: 05-04-2015 10:41 PM by evenheathen.)
Palilalia
So this is a new and interesting development for me and my wife.

I actually didn't really notice until my wife started mentioning it over the week and my MIL said she had noticed also. Now that they've brought it to my attention, I notice it constantly. Our four year old has a habit of repeating everything he says back to himself in a whisper.

It's very odd, he doesn't acknowledge the fact that he does it, but he does. We just got back from visiting my family for Easter and at one time his cousin called attention to it, over the weekend I paid more attention and he does it all the time.

So I googled it and came up with the term palilalia, which seems to fit perfectly. From what I've gleaned from my initial research, it's rare but not all that uncommon. It can be associated with children with aspergers or autism, but only if accompanied by other tell tale symptoms of those conditions of which my son doesn't at this time.

My son is very bright, and speaks well beyond his age and always has. It's more like he's repeating what he's said to make sure it sounds correct. He doesn't have any other signs of mental problems. I've also read that children who display this behavior can have aversions to loud noises and are perfectionists who tend to display palilalia more often when anxious or in situations that make them nervous.

This really describes my son well. He's not a perfectionist to the point that he has behaviors that are OCD, but he doesn't like to try new things unless he know he can do them right.

So from what I've read I'm not all that worried about it, he seems bright and happy and the worst I'm thinking is that he'll get made fun of when he starts school.

I've also read that when he was a child, Einstein did the exact same thing, leading his family to believe that he had a learning disability. Big Grin (of course he was a late bloomer when it came to talking, not like my son)

Anyway, I find this all fascinating, and as a parent I'm a bit concerned as to what exactly it could mean. I'm wondering if anyone else out there in TTA land have any experience with this?

I'd love to get some feedback.
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06-04-2015, 05:51 AM
RE: Palilalia
Hi, EH.

I recall reading about this and echolalia when doing research when my son first showed signs of Asperger's Syndrome. Although it did not apply to him.

It made me think of a skill that all the best film actors have ... the ability to repeat a line in many different intonations / styles / emotions to allow the director to choose the right one.

It strikes me that people with this condition are experimenting / practicing. Actually, I do it (of course, knowingly) for my courses. So the big difference is self-awareness (or lack of).

Depending on the subject's disposition, being made fun of at school will either be scarring or will be a learning opportunity. In our case, teasing and also bullying were symptoms that alerted us to our son's condition so, sadly, we weren't able to prepare him for that.

That's one thing you can do... provide / talk about ways to deal with being perceived as different ... and avoid the potential scarring.

Good luck, bro. Hug

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06-04-2015, 05:54 AM
RE: Palilalia
Any chance his name is "Brick"??

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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06-04-2015, 06:15 AM
RE: Palilalia
Yes, Brick, that is a kid in a sitcom who does this. Not sure about which one, I just end up watching one or the other sitcom periodically...

From what I recall he was portrayed as bright and the only thing he did differently from others was the whispering...

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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06-04-2015, 06:16 AM
RE: Palilalia
(06-04-2015 05:54 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  Any chance his name is "Brick"??

Haven't seen the show, but I've heard about it.

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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06-04-2015, 06:16 AM
RE: Palilalia
"The Middle"

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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06-04-2015, 06:24 AM
RE: Palilalia
So, does he understand the words he repeated, or is he repeating them to see if they then make sense?

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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06-04-2015, 07:08 AM
Re: Palilalia
My son did this from 5yo to about 6yo. He'd whisper everything he said after he said it. Slowly he started mouthing the words with no sound.

As he became more socially aware, he'd try to not even mouth the words; you could tell he was thinking them over in his head. This was around 7 years of age.

As of right now, he's nine. The rapidity of his speech makes me doubt that he still thinks over all his spoken words.
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06-04-2015, 09:21 AM
RE: Palilalia
(06-04-2015 06:24 AM)Dom Wrote:  So, does he understand the words he repeated, or is he repeating them to see if they then make sense?

He completely understands what he's saying, the kid surprises me every day with his vocabulary. It's just a "tic".

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

~ Umberto Eco
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29-08-2015, 08:57 PM
RE: Palilalia
Interesting. I don't have any experience with this, either with myself, siblings or with my spawn. But I'd recommend a tactful way of bringing this to his attention, so as to minimize his worry. I don't think it seems like a big deal, but you never can tell, with kids. He's probably fine, but making him aware of it tactfully will help him overcome it before he gets in trouble with his "peers". I've seen a lot of shit happen to kids who were only marginally different, in my lifetime. Not to say that you aren't great parents, more an observation of the world at large.
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