Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard
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19-05-2016, 08:31 PM
RE: Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard
(19-05-2016 07:35 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(19-05-2016 07:31 PM)Leo Wrote:  But mercy and forgiveness are alien to Chuck Norris mind.

Chuck Norris is the √úbermensch. He is beyond good and evil.
He is what? No sprechen sie Deutsch. Smile

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19-05-2016, 08:33 PM
RE: Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard
(19-05-2016 07:31 PM)Leo Wrote:  
(19-05-2016 07:28 PM)Alla Wrote:  I told them it was about forgiveness(mercy) they didn't believe me.

But mercy and forgiveness are alien to Chuck Norris mind.
wow! but why? Shocking

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22-05-2016, 12:13 PM
RE: Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard
(08-05-2016 05:55 PM)debna27 Wrote:  So I've been dealing with a lot of stress at my job lately, some of which is because I feel like certain people do a lot more of the work than others even though we're all paid the same rate. I know this is quite a common issue, and when I was thinking about it the other day I remembered having a similar complaint in high school regarding group projects. When I talked to one of my teachers about it, he reminded me of the parable in Matthew 20 in which a man hires workers throughout the day and gives the same wage to those who worked all day as to those who only worked for an hour. The lesson that my teacher was emphasizing was that I shouldn't compare my rewards/grades to those around me, and I should just do my best and be happy with what I earn from it (it was obviously a Christian school). I've also heard this parable applied to accepting Christ, that those who convert late in life get the same reward (heaven) as the life-long believers.

I remember being really unsatisfied deep down with the message that this parable was teaching. At the time, I thought this was just my sin nature, which Jesus was trying to teach me to fight against. Now, I obviously think rather differently. I'm rather torn on the overall message though. It seems hugely unjust for one person to do several times as much work as another and both receive the same payment; but, on the other hand, if someone agrees to a certain contract only to see someone else get a better one, I suppose there's not much room for complaint. Is this thinking erroneous/a vestige of religious mentality? Do any of you have any opinions on the morality of this message?

(Also, I feel like I should point out that I know that the Bible isn't a reliable source from which to take one's morals, even though a good percentage of the society in which we live often does that exact thing. However, I do think that there are some ideas in it that are interesting to consider from a philosophical standpoint, which is why I'm bothering to bring this up at all).

Deb.
The parable is about people finding the moral path. It's not about being rewarded unequally for work. It's a parable after all. There is another parable about a master who gives his workers money to look after and the one who makes the most of it gets the greatest reward while the one who does nothing with it gets the least reward upon the return of his master. The message of the new testament is just to do unto others as others would do unto you. You are equally entitled as your teacher to interpret that as you like or disregard it. I would say your teacher was misinterpreting it but his point is that hard work rewards itself and those who dont put in the effort in academic subjects inevitably fall by the wayside.
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