Passion vs Practicality as a career choice
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19-10-2015, 09:34 PM
RE: Passion vs Practicality as a career choice
If you have the financial backing to take the leap, you should follow your passion. If you know that you have marketable skills that can bring in money down the road, then do it. If you don't have the financial backing, then maybe now isn't the right time, or maybe you can get a business loan of some sort.

I don't have much in the way of practical advice to offer, but I did recently return to school to follow my own passion. It feels great, and I'm excited about the future. I wish for you the same excitement and zeal. Good luck. Smile
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25-04-2016, 03:50 AM
RE: Passion vs Practicality as a career choice
As an update:

I decided against going into Bioinformatics. Software engineering is a black hole of careers so I would end up paying to do an MSc to get into Biology and still have to sort out all the crappy code written by Biologists because there's such a pressing need for it. I'm getting sick of working as a code monkey to do all the necessary work for other scientists to have a fulfilling career while I have a career I hate.

A.I. is my passion but there are no opportunities for me. So I am currently facing another question about how to proceed. I need to create my own opportunities and get the A.I. working for me.

I've been working on a revolutionary new architecture in A.I. since 2010. I have a paper almost completely written and some good results. My new architecture is at least as good as using local learning neural networks. It tackles what I consider to be one of the hardest problems in A.I. Until we tackle problems such as these there will be no strong A.I. There is no funding for these kind of ideas because they are too blue sky. But a published paper might help me secure funding.

It's made up of three experiments. It does well on the first two, not so good on the third. But if I wait yet another year I know that I could come up with some really fantastic. If I publish now then other people who do have funding might use the idea and do their own version while I am languishing in a boring job that doesn't give me time to work on my own stuff.

But as far as anyone is concerned, I haven't done anything in the field since 2010 so this makes it difficult for me to find work in A.I. A published paper would help with this. But I could produce something with greater impact if I wait a bit longer. Or even not bother publishing it at all if I found it useful for playing the stock market for example (a very real possibility)

Unfortunately the deadline for this year's conference is only two week's away. It's in southern Germany which would have been perfect for me.
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25-04-2016, 03:52 AM
RE: Passion vs Practicality as a career choice
(25-04-2016 03:50 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  As an update:

I decided against going into Bioinformatics. Software engineering is a black hole of careers so I would end up paying to do an MSc to get into Biology and still have to sort out all the crappy code written by Biologists because there's such a pressing need for it. I'm getting sick of working as a code monkey to do all the necessary work for other scientists to have a fulfilling career while I have a career I hate.

A.I. is my passion but there are no opportunities for me. So I am currently facing another question about how to proceed. I need to create my own opportunities and get the A.I. working for me.

I've been working on a revolutionary new architecture in A.I. since 2010. I have a paper almost completely written and some good results. My new architecture is at least as good as using local learning neural networks. It tackles what I consider to be one of the hardest problems in A.I. Until we tackle problems such as these there will be no strong A.I. There is no funding for these kind of ideas because they are too blue sky. But a published paper might help me secure funding.

It's made up of three experiments. It does well on the first two, not so good on the third. But if I wait yet another year I know that I could come up with some really fantastic. If I publish now then other people who do have funding might use the idea and do their own version while I am languishing in a boring job that doesn't give me time to work on my own stuff.

But as far as anyone is concerned, I haven't done anything in the field since 2010 so this makes it difficult for me to find work in A.I. A published paper would help with this. But I could produce something with greater impact if I wait a bit longer. Or even not bother publishing it at all if I found it useful for playing the stock market for example (a very real possibility)

Unfortunately the deadline for this year's conference is only two week's away. It's in southern Germany which would have been perfect for me.

My instinct would be to publish. Otherwise it'll always be what-ifs.

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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28-06-2016, 09:00 AM (This post was last modified: 28-06-2016 09:18 AM by Mathilda.)
RE: Passion vs Practicality as a career choice
OK I think I've completely fucked myself in the arse on this one.

It was pointed out to me that most crappy code in Bioinformatics doesn't get re-used, so I could just be writing my own crappy code rather than have to sort out everyone else's. Also work started to become slightly more interesting because I got the opportunity to get my hands on real world data. That and the dire state of the job market made me think that maybe I should get into Bioinformatics.

Anyway my past caught up with me. Each year we need to do our annual appraisal. Because I was changing groups, and therefore bosses, I delayed it long enough that my previous boss gave up trying to get me to do it and my new boss never realised that I hadn't done it. I did this deliberately because my moral was at rock bottom at the time.

But HR realised and told my new boss that I needed to do the annual appraisal for the last four months that I have been working for her. During the appraisal I mentioned the idea that I would like to get some experience with Bioinformatics. Much to her credit she decided that my final 6 months should be spent doing this. Maybe because the previous project was a failure because the Mathematician that I needed to work is a Mathematician and therefore by definition has trouble communicating with other human beings.

Maybe they just don't realise how little I know or maybe they just don't realise how much jargon they use. Probably both to be honest. But I've just had to start reading through an introduction to something about genetics and it's so full of jargon that isn't ever explained that none of it means anything to me.

Seriously considering looking for another job now.
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28-06-2016, 09:30 AM
RE: Passion vs Practicality as a career choice
Undecided

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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10-07-2016, 08:16 PM
RE: Passion vs Practicality as a career choice
practicality always works because passion can pass as an effective hobby for an enthusiast to make money. But the practical approach to a hobby may not be something you follow through with. Two jobs, over one and a chore.
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