Permian seasonality
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16-06-2015, 07:42 AM
Permian seasonality
"Gradients in Seasonality and Seawater Oxygen Isotopic Composition along the Early Permian Gondwanan Coast, SE Australia"


It is finally published (only online for the time being but it will be in print in September)

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16-06-2015, 08:18 AM
RE: Permian seasonality
No one wants to learn about Permian climates?!!!

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16-06-2015, 08:26 AM
RE: Permian seasonality
I do ... I do.
But I'm at work and I have to present the Dept stats and some clinical stuff to these old fuddy duddy docs today.. one of whom is famous for "going after" the "new guy". I'm hoping he doesn't know my dad and tries his routine, and I can hand him his ass right back ... with a smile. My boss said "wear a tie". (Shit ... I don't even have one up here in LA). Weeping

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16-06-2015, 08:29 AM
RE: Permian seasonality
(16-06-2015 08:26 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  I do ... I do.
But I'm at work and I have to present the Dept stats and some clinical stuff to these old fuddy duddy docs today.. one of whom is famous for "going after" the "new guy". I'm hoping he doesn't know my dad and tries his routine, and I can hand him his ass right back ... with a smile. My boss said "wear a tie". (Shit ... I don't even have one up here in LA). Weeping

Thanks Bucky Thumbsup

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16-06-2015, 08:33 AM (This post was last modified: 16-06-2015 08:37 AM by Chas.)
RE: Permian seasonality
(16-06-2015 07:42 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  "Gradients in Seasonality and Seawater Oxygen Isotopic Composition along the Early Permian Gondwanan Coast, SE Australia"


It is finally published (only online for the time being but it will be in print in September)

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16-06-2015, 08:34 AM
RE: Permian seasonality
(16-06-2015 08:18 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  No one wants to learn about Permian climates?!!!

Geez, give a guy a few freakin' minutes to read it. Angry

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16-06-2015, 10:59 AM
RE: Permian seasonality
Sorry dude, that stuff is completely over my head. I am just a dumb accountant and my natural sciences coursework is 25 years behind me.

However, congrats on getting it published. Even I understand that is important.

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16-06-2015, 11:13 AM
Re: Permian seasonality
I plan on reading it tonight after the kids are in bed. And quiet. Mmm.. sweet, sweet silence.
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16-06-2015, 12:43 PM
RE: Permian seasonality
(16-06-2015 08:18 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  No one wants to learn about Permian climates?!!!

I mean... I would but it's really way over my head. Can you say it in *really* simple terms? As I understand from my brief skim read, you've studied oxygen isotopes in shells of marine animals which lets you get a handle on temperature, but the technique is fiddly for really old samples because reasons, but you fiddled your way around it using techniques and you have now established (within error limits) some kinda rough estimate of temperatures in coastal Southern Gondwanaland, in case any time traveller is looking for an exotic holiday destination?

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16-06-2015, 01:51 PM
RE: Permian seasonality
(16-06-2015 12:43 PM)morondog Wrote:  
(16-06-2015 08:18 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  No one wants to learn about Permian climates?!!!

I mean... I would but it's really way over my head. Can you say it in *really* simple terms? As I understand from my brief skim read, you've studied oxygen isotopes in shells of marine animals which lets you get a handle on temperature, but the technique is fiddly for really old samples because reasons, but you fiddled your way around it using techniques and you have now established (within error limits) some kinda rough estimate of temperatures in coastal Southern Gondwanaland, in case any time traveller is looking for an exotic holiday destination?

That's pretty close. Oxygen isotopes are incorporated into carbonates, and the ratio of Oxygen16 to Oxygen18 is temperature dependent. So I can look at the ratio of O16/O18 and use that to calculate the temperature that the calcite formed at. And since organisms like bivalves grow year-round, I can sample along growth lines and get temperature values for each growth interval, thus allowing me to reconstruct seasonal temperatures. That might seem trivial today when you can look the information up on your phone easily, but these are 290 million year old temperature records.

Now, that is cool enough, but it isn't that simple. The ratio of O16/O18 is also dependent upon the ratio of the O16/O18 in the water that the calcite precipitates out of. For the more recent past (the last 65 million years or so), this is fairly well understood, but past this we don't have good constraints on the compositions of the water. Some say it has not changed, but that leads to unreasonably warm water at certain times in Earth's history (in excess of 50°C water for the Cambrian when most organisms can't survive for prolonged periods above 35°C or so because the enzymes in their bodies break down). Some have proposed that the composition of the water has changed, but the mechanisms for how the oceans O16/O18 ratio could change are also not well understood and controversial.

So, my study utilizes an area where we have an independent constraint on temperatures, thus allowing us to use the O16/O18 ratio to calculate water compositions instead of temperatures. That gives us a better constraint on the seasonal range of temperatures and also shows that water compositions for the ocean were likely to be more depleted than what has been proposed plausible. Meaning that water compositions do appear to be different in the Earth's distant past. If that is true, then we can continue to better constrain water compositions in order to get better estimates for water temperature at different points in Earth's history.

That has far-reaching applications. Such as:
What are the thermal tolerances for organisms over prolonged periods of time?

How does climate change impact life?

What range of temperature, climatic, or seasonal change is detrimental to biodiversity?

What is the magnitude of climatic change in the Earth's past, and how does that compare to the modern climatic change?

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