Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
12-08-2015, 09:29 PM
Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
The Perseid meteor shower is expected to peak tonight, helped by lack of moonlight and a boost from Jupiter. Look between Perseus and Cassiopeia in the northeastern sky between midnight and dawn.

http://www.space.com/30216-perseid-meteo...boost.html

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like RocketSurgeon76's post
12-08-2015, 09:39 PM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
(12-08-2015 09:29 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  The Perseid meteor shower is expected to peak tonight, helped by lack of moonlight and a boost from Jupiter. Look between Perseus and Cassiopeia in the northeastern sky between midnight and dawn.

http://www.space.com/30216-perseid-meteo...boost.html

I'm going to be watching them tonight Thumbsup
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes jennybee's post
12-08-2015, 09:50 PM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
When my dad used to take me stargazing at Gould's Inlet (yes, really called that, but sadly not after the scientist), a remote and lightless corner of the island in the Atlantic where I grew up, Cassiopeia was my favorite constellation. We used Orion as our "base" to locate other stars, including nearby Gemini (my birth-sign), when he was trying to tell me where to find something up there, since it's hard to just point at the sky with your finger on a dark night.

Cassiopeia is near to Orion, and as a little kid, I became fascinated to learn that it and Orion "harbor" stellar nurseries and nebulae, where stars are both dying and being born. I still smile at the memory of the visions of this process I formed in my head, as a kid, after reading all I could and being told so much about it by my dad. (Unfortunately for my very-Christian father, it was this love of space science that led me to realize my church was full of crap, when they brought in an anti-evolution preacher who made the unfortunate decision to include misinformation about astrophysics, which I actually knew enough about to detect the BS.) He also woke 10-year-old me up every night at 4AM to go out and look at Halley's Comet, each night it was visible. We went out for numerous Perseid and Geminid and Leonid shower-watchings. Good memories.

I plan to stay up to see these showers, too. Smile

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes RocketSurgeon76's post
12-08-2015, 09:53 PM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
(12-08-2015 09:50 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  When my dad used to take me stargazing at Gould's Inlet (yes, really called that, but sadly not after the scientist), a remote and lightless corner of the island in the Atlantic where I grew up, Cassiopeia was my favorite constellation. We used Orion as our "base" to locate other stars, including nearby Gemini (my birth-sign), when he was trying to tell me where to find something up there, since it's hard to just point at the sky with your finger on a dark night.

Cassiopeia is near to Orion, and as a little kid, I became fascinated to learn that it and Orion "harbor" stellar nurseries and nebulae, where stars are both dying and being born. I still smile at the memory of the visions of this process I formed in my head, as a kid, after reading all I could and being told so much about it by my dad. (Unfortunately for my very-Christian father, it was this love of space science that led me to realize my church was full of crap, when they brought in an anti-evolution preacher who made the unfortunate decision to include misinformation about astrophysics, which I actually knew enough about to detect the BS.) He also woke 10-year-old me up every night at 4AM to go out and look at Halley's Comet, each night it was visible. We went out for numerous Perseid and Geminid and Leonid shower-watchings. Good memories.

I plan to stay up to see these showers, too. Smile

Such nice memories to have with your dad Smile I am a Gemini too Thumbsup
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes jennybee's post
12-08-2015, 10:50 PM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
My son and I were talking about this earlier. We're enjoying our last dinner together for quite some time, and after we're done, we're gonna sit out in the bed of my pickup truck and count falling stars.

Life is good, y'know?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Thumpalumpacus's post
13-08-2015, 02:40 AM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
(12-08-2015 09:50 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  When my dad used to take me stargazing at Gould's Inlet (yes, really called that, but sadly not after the scientist), a remote and lightless corner of the island in the Atlantic where I grew up, Cassiopeia was my favorite constellation. We used Orion as our "base" to locate other stars, including nearby Gemini (my birth-sign), when he was trying to tell me where to find something up there, since it's hard to just point at the sky with your finger on a dark night.

Cassiopeia is near to Orion, and as a little kid, I became fascinated to learn that it and Orion "harbor" stellar nurseries and nebulae, where stars are both dying and being born. I still smile at the memory of the visions of this process I formed in my head, as a kid, after reading all I could and being told so much about it by my dad. (Unfortunately for my very-Christian father, it was this love of space science that led me to realize my church was full of crap, when they brought in an anti-evolution preacher who made the unfortunate decision to include misinformation about astrophysics, which I actually knew enough about to detect the BS.) He also woke 10-year-old me up every night at 4AM to go out and look at Halley's Comet, each night it was visible. We went out for numerous Perseid and Geminid and Leonid shower-watchings. Good memories.

I plan to stay up to see these showers, too. Smile

Hmmm, in my planet's sky, Cassiopeia and Orion don't appear close to each other. Consider

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
13-08-2015, 02:57 AM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
Straight arc in the night sky: Orion->Taurus->Perseus->Cassiopeia

For the other directions, immediately adjacent are Pegasus and Gemini.

Very handy for pointing out where things are in relation to the "find this quickly" arc, when you're stargazing.

4 AM... just got in from stargazing at about 3:35. Big Grin

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
13-08-2015, 02:59 AM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
Well, I suppose I was "meteor-gazing".

Damn, but there were a lot of mosquitoes out, tonight!

*scratch, scratch, scratch*

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
13-08-2015, 03:10 AM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
(13-08-2015 02:57 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  Straight arc in the night sky: Orion->Taurus->Perseus->Cassiopeia

For the other directions, immediately adjacent are Pegasus and Gemini.

Very handy for pointing out where things are in relation to the "find this quickly" arc, when you're stargazing.

4 AM... just got in from stargazing at about 3:35. Big Grin

At 03:15, Cassiopeia was near the zenith and Orion hadn't risen. Consider

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
13-08-2015, 03:18 AM
RE: Perseids peak tonight (8/12-13)
*sigh* Chas, re-read my post. I was referring to stargazing with my father in 1986. Those were the constellations easily findable in the sky for a little kid (me), in order to say, "and just to the right of that is _____".

Yep, tonight, Orion was not up (it was just under the horizon, according to my now-easy-to-use smartphone with SkyWalk2). Cassiopeia was easy to make out, though, which is what made it one of the four big "landmark" constellations for our direction-finding, out on East Beach/Gould's Inlet.

Lighten up, dude.

Rolleyes

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: