Plastics
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13-01-2015, 01:00 PM
Plastics
I was talking to a friend who told me they've eliminated almost all plastics from their kitchen. No plastic wrap, no food storage bags. No baggies for sandwiches.

Everything goes into stainless steal or glass. Including her kid's lunches. I can't even wrap my head around that. I assume her children must be used to the routine. Sure you can wrap a sandwich in waxed paper, but...I dunno. No plastic drinking cups (even for outdoor use like poolside). The only exception is her youngest who sometimes takes a baby bottle.

She buys 90% of what she can in bulk. She won't buy anything wrapped in plastic (she says) -- I don't know how you avoid buying sliced bread that isn't wrapped in plastic of some sort. Unless she bakes her own bread and slices it by hand -- i have no idea.

Even milk is purchased in glass bottles and returned to the store for the bottle deposit when she buys more milk or cream.

Has anyone here thought eliminating plastics from their life or doing it? Or is my friend just nuts?


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13-01-2015, 01:06 PM
RE: Plastics
Well, reducing the amount of plastic you use is a good idea, less plastic demand = less plastic production.

But I think that, as for anything in life, you need some common sense and also be realistic, you cannot avoid ALL plastic:

- Do you use a computer? There's plastic.
- Do you have a car? There's plastic.
- Do you buy cosmetics? There's plastic.

I don't think I need to go on. Tongue

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13-01-2015, 01:20 PM
RE: Plastics
The long term effect of ingesting plastic residues are unknown.

She can't really eliminate leaked plastics from her food - too late for that. Most food is at least washed on conveyor belts - made of plastic.

Some plastics are known to leach carcinogens , these are slowly being removed - for instance look for labels saying "BPA free" when you buy sandwich baggies etc. Look for this also on plastic water bottles, or the ones you carry your drinks in.

Chances are that there are a lot more harmful substances leached into our food supply, contributing to our cancer rates and perhaps disorders, who knows. No one has an interest in paying for studies, least of all the company producing the stuff. The composition of plastics changes constantly, so it would be almost impossible to test and keep track of it all.

What else you can do to protect yourself somewhat is to not ever heat plastics with food in them. I do use glass in the micro.

Pretty much, resistance is futile. Just avoid the proven pitfalls - BPA and heated plastics.

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13-01-2015, 01:46 PM
RE: Plastics
I avoid plastics more because of the environmental impact. Even just using a glass mason jar instead of a plastic water bottle makes a difference. It actually gets easier to cut out plastics once you're used to looking for the alternatives.

That being said, there's no way I could completely avoid them. I doubt your friend avoids them as much as she claims as well. Not buying anything packaged in plastic? Nearly impossible imo. I'm not perfect, but I think I do better than most in this area.

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13-01-2015, 02:25 PM
RE: Plastics
(13-01-2015 01:06 PM)The Polyglot Atheist Wrote:  Well, reducing the amount of plastic you use is a good idea, less plastic demand = less plastic production.

But I think that, as for anything in life, you need some common sense and also be realistic, you cannot avoid ALL plastic:

- Do you use a computer? There's plastic.
- Do you have a car? There's plastic.
- Do you buy cosmetics? There's plastic.

I don't think I need to go on. Tongue

Yeah, lol my car is mostly plastic. Smile She was talking mostly about inside the kitchen -- food storage and stuff.

(13-01-2015 01:20 PM)Dom Wrote:  The long term effect of ingesting plastic residues are unknown.

She can't really eliminate leaked plastics from her food - too late for that. Most food is at least washed on conveyor belts - made of plastic.

Some plastics are known to leach carcinogens , these are slowly being removed - for instance look for labels saying "BPA free" when you buy sandwich baggies etc. Look for this also on plastic water bottles, or the ones you carry your drinks in.

Chances are that there are a lot more harmful substances leached into our food supply, contributing to our cancer rates and perhaps disorders, who knows. No one has an interest in paying for studies, least of all the company producing the stuff. The composition of plastics changes constantly, so it would be almost impossible to test and keep track of it all.

What else you can do to protect yourself somewhat is to not ever heat plastics with food in them. I do use glass in the micro.

Pretty much, resistance is futile. Just avoid the proven pitfalls - BPA and heated plastics.

I have some Rubbermaid glass storage things, they have plastic tops, I'm ok with tossing them in the microwave, but the glad ware stuff, I usually put it onto a plate and heat that (because it reheats better).

That said, I don't think she's doing it for health reasons -- as far as I know. I think it's more environment like Stark mentioned.

(13-01-2015 01:46 PM)Stark Raving Wrote:  I avoid plastics more because of the environmental impact. Even just using a glass mason jar instead of a plastic water bottle makes a difference. It actually gets easier to cut out plastics once you're used to looking for the alternatives.

That being said, there's no way I could completely avoid them. I doubt your friend avoids them as much as she claims as well. Not buying anything packaged in plastic? Nearly impossible imo. I'm not perfect, but I think I do better than most in this area.

Yes, this! Today I went to Target, everything food wise is wrapped in some sort of plastic.

It's funny, here she is lecturing me on plastics -- and I totally get the environmental impact -- so I bought some freezer paper which was a bit cheaper than the freezer bags and some small mason jars. Along with my other crap I needed to buy.

I left the reusable bags in the car. Weeping Thank goodness we didn't leave together.

I will admit the small mason jars will be handy for when I buy honey and almond butter at the market. The almond butter is made there so it just goes into the glass and the honey is cheaper if you buy it on tap. They charge for the plastic tubs. Smile

I don't think I could avoid all pastics.


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13-01-2015, 03:31 PM
RE: Plastics
When I was a very little we always had milk in glass bottles, that's just the way they came. Then they came is a sort of a wax cardboard which I still see in the stores.

We were very, very poor when I was a kid and my mother used the wax paper that wraps the cereal inside the cereal box to wrap our school lunches with. As a matter of fact, that's what she used to wrap all kinds of food in. Growing up I thought only rich people had plastic wrap. It was sort of exotic. We also only had glass everything. My mother used jelly jars for our drinking glasses. I don't remember any plastic of any kind.

We never had paper towels either , she always used old rags for cleaning. We always dried our washing by hanging them on a rope outside or in bad weather we'd hang them inside. And most of the clothes I had were hand-me-downs or bought at a thrift store or something my mother had sewn. She only used cloth diapers. We only had one car so us kids had to actually walk places if we wanted to get somewhere. Imagine that.

Yeah, we were super poor.

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13-01-2015, 03:44 PM (This post was last modified: 13-01-2015 03:48 PM by Bows and Arrows.)
RE: Plastics
yes, I have many 'crunchy granola' friends on vaying levels of what they avoid. Some will fall for all the woo claims, some cant be bothered to determined what is woo and what isnt so do a mix of things, some claim bogus science, some actually bother to look into things.

We 'avoid' plastic in our house but its far from being eliminated. We use stainless water bottles (although we have a few plastic too), now that the kids are older we pitched the plastic cups and only use glass. Same with bowls, plates, etc.

I did it when loads of info about BPA came out, most plastics will have a number stamped on the bottom, certain types are better than others. So I pitched a bunch at one time, and if I had to replace, I replaced with glass or stainless. And I did it for the environmental impact, at the same time I was hearing about the plastic islands in the oceans, made me sad.

We still use it for some things, like my girls have a half gallon igloo jug they use at soccer. And my sister probably has picked up the slack for both me and your friend. Dodgy

ETA: you can get a six pack of glasses at IKEA for about $3. Wink


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13-01-2015, 06:17 PM
RE: Plastics
(13-01-2015 03:31 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  When I was a very little we always had milk in glass bottles, that's just the way they came. Then they came is a sort of a wax cardboard which I still see in the stores.

We were very, very poor when I was a kid and my mother used the wax paper that wraps the cereal inside the cereal box to wrap our school lunches with. As a matter of fact, that's what she used to wrap all kinds of food in. Growing up I thought only rich people had plastic wrap. It was sort of exotic. We also only had glass everything. My mother used jelly jars for our drinking glasses. I don't remember any plastic of any kind.

We never had paper towels either , she always used old rags for cleaning. We always dried our washing by hanging them on a rope outside or in bad weather we'd hang them inside. And most of the clothes I had were hand-me-downs or bought at a thrift store or something my mother had sewn. She only used cloth diapers. We only had one car so us kids had to actually walk places if we wanted to get somewhere. Imagine that.

Yeah, we were super poor.

Hug

We were poor too. Growing up on food stamps wasn't fun.

Looking back, we never used paper towels. We did buy waxed paper. But we never used Saran wrap -- it was too expensive. My dad would cut up his old t-shirts and we'd use those as dish towels and dust cloths.

My grandma used to wash paper plates to reuse them, she also reused aluminum foil. We had drawer full of it. Lol. Oh and we'd save paper bags.

My big project during the summer months was to take all my dad's old tube socks and make potholders. Eeeew.

My mom couldn't drive -- actually neither did my grandma. I was the first girl in my family to get a diver's license.

(13-01-2015 03:44 PM)Bows and Arrows Wrote:  yes, I have many 'crunchy granola' friends on vaying levels of what they avoid. Some will fall for all the woo claims, some cant be bothered to determined what is woo and what isnt so do a mix of things, some claim bogus science, some actually bother to look into things.

We 'avoid' plastic in our house but its far from being eliminated. We use stainless water bottles (although we have a few plastic too), now that the kids are older we pitched the plastic cups and only use glass. Same with bowls, plates, etc.

I did it when loads of info about BPA came out, most plastics will have a number stamped on the bottom, certain types are better than others. So I pitched a bunch at one time, and if I had to replace, I replaced with glass or stainless. And I did it for the environmental impact, at the same time I was hearing about the plastic islands in the oceans, made me sad.

We still use it for some things, like my girls have a half gallon igloo jug they use at soccer. And my sister probably has picked up the slack for both me and your friend. Dodgy

ETA: you can get a six pack of glasses at IKEA for about $3. Wink

Crunchy granola..Laugh out load

I think the more I think about it the more about these thing. Sure glad ware is cheaper than say Tupperware, but also easier to just toss out. It never used to bother me, but lately I'm thinking about all the stuff we just toss out.

Yeah, my son was telling me about all the birds and fish that eat plastic thinking it's food. Undecided

If I can eliminate some of it, save a little money and not hurt the environment -- I'm good.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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13-01-2015, 06:25 PM
RE: Plastics
I had forgotten about reusing foil. Even after dad graduated from college and was making good money, mom still did that. But by that time there were paper plates in the house though they weren't used for much more than if someone had a sandwich. Otherwise it was the real plates (that I washed Dodgy ).

There were some other 'splurges' like paper towels but mom would also wash and reuse baggies. And they weren't even the ziploc kind but the ones with the fold-over flaps that were basically useless. And the paper bags from the grocery store were used to drain fried foods and as trash bags.

Funny, I had forgotten about a lot of that. And mom's choices of what she recycled and what she didn't were a little random.

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13-01-2015, 06:46 PM
RE: Plastics
(13-01-2015 06:25 PM)Anjele Wrote:  I had forgotten about reusing foil. Even after dad graduated from college and was making good money, mom still did that. But by that time there were paper plates in the house though they weren't used for much more than if someone had a sandwich. Otherwise it was the real plates (that I washed Dodgy ).

There were some other 'splurges' like paper towels but mom would also wash and reuse baggies. And they weren't even the ziploc kind but the ones with the fold-over flaps that were basically useless. And the paper bags from the grocery store were used to drain fried foods and as trash bags.

Funny, I had forgotten about a lot of that. And mom's choices of what she recycled and what she didn't were a little random.

Omg you sparked a huge memory of the drawer at Grandma's house filled with empty coffee cans and cool whip containers.

I recall when I was little she would save and wash out mayo jars (they were glass back in the day).

I remember when Parkay margarine came out, and the pretty tubs that they knew people would save and reuse. They didn't say Parkay on them...the cardboard did. The idea was they'll look pretty on the table.

I cannot begin to recall how many of those things we tossed out when she moved in 1981. Hundreds. The old coffee cans she'd save, cover them with Christmas paper and use them to ship cookies (sandbakkles) to family.
wow! I hadn't thought of that shit for years and years.

She also saved jelly jars...


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And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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