Polydactyly
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06-04-2015, 10:35 AM
Polydactyly
I have a fun story to share. Big Grin. My daughter was born with Type I and Type III postaxial polydactyly. It's a genetic condition passed on from her father's side. Extra digits on the hands were type I. They were non-functional and malformed. Her extra toes- fully formed and functional.

The nurse at the hospital was convinced that the devil was involved...she told me so. She also filled out paperwork stating the extra digits were the result of drug use- because her friend's cousin's baby had an extra finger since the mother was on drugs. I had to stay in the hospital with the baby three extra days to be "monitored."

The type I digits were removed within a few months. One via suture ligation, the other with a very short operation. No problems, wonderful.

Babies sometimes like to pull their socks off. My girl definitely did. In public, I was told fantastic tales about her toes... how she's descended from the race of giants that produced Goliath. How she's an abomination in the eyes of god. Demons. That I will burn in hell if I don't have them removed. Fantastic!

The specialist said to bring her in for X-rays after she began walking. I did. I was advised to wait a bit longer, as the foot surgery would require minor reconstruction and a full leg cast. I was also told that the digits were likely to start growing abnormally; if they did, I should bring her back immediately.

Fast forward one more year, we return to the specialist. (No abnormal growth yet, but she's walking very well.) Now I am told that I waited too long, that the restructuring of the ligaments (if I remember the term correctly) would be very difficult and the area might not heal right. Next specialist: says it's completely up to me since the extra digits are sound and growing normally. I opt to not have two main surgeries, with likely reconstructive surgeries afterward.

Now she's older it's not pointed out as much since strangers are no longer compelled to "count the baby's piggies." The extra digits are not noticeable.

I've consulted with more medical professionals along the way. There aren't any medical reasons to remove the perfectly functional, well-formed extra digits.

When it comes up now, people make a big deal that I chose not to have them removed. Usually these people's reasons are supernatural.. curses, the devil, evil giants, blah blah blah.

My responses have changed from trying to intelligently discuss polydactyly, to snarky comebacks, and finally to just walking away.

I'd like to know how some of you would respond to such comments.
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06-04-2015, 10:50 AM
RE: Polydactyly
(06-04-2015 10:35 AM)mecanna Wrote:  I have a fun story to share. Big Grin. My daughter was born with Type I and Type III postaxial polydactyly. It's a genetic condition passed on from her father's side. Extra digits on the hands were type I. They were non-functional and malformed. Her extra toes- fully formed and functional.

The nurse at the hospital was convinced that the devil was involved...she told me so. She also filled out paperwork stating the extra digits were the result of drug use- because her friend's cousin's baby had an extra finger since the mother was on drugs. I had to stay in the hospital with the baby three extra days to be "monitored."

The type I digits were removed within a few months. One via suture ligation, the other with a very short operation. No problems, wonderful.

Babies sometimes like to pull their socks off. My girl definitely did. In public, I was told fantastic tales about her toes... how she's descended from the race of giants that produced Goliath. How she's an abomination in the eyes of god. Demons. That I will burn in hell if I don't have them removed. Fantastic!

The specialist said to bring her in for X-rays after she began walking. I did. I was advised to wait a bit longer, as the foot surgery would require minor reconstruction and a full leg cast. I was also told that the digits were likely to start growing abnormally; if they did, I should bring her back immediately.

Fast forward one more year, we return to the specialist. (No abnormal growth yet, but she's walking very well.) Now I am told that I waited too long, that the restructuring of the ligaments (if I remember the term correctly) would be very difficult and the area might not heal right. Next specialist: says it's completely up to me since the extra digits are sound and growing normally. I opt to not have two main surgeries, with likely reconstructive surgeries afterward.

Now she's older it's not pointed out as much since strangers are no longer compelled to "count the baby's piggies." The extra digits are not noticeable.

I've consulted with more medical professionals along the way. There aren't any medical reasons to remove the perfectly functional, well-formed extra digits.

When it comes up now, people make a big deal that I chose not to have them removed. Usually these people's reasons are supernatural.. curses, the devil, evil giants, blah blah blah.

My responses have changed from trying to intelligently discuss polydactyly, to snarky comebacks, and finally to just walking away.

I'd like to know how some of you would respond to such comments.

You should have sued the damn hospital ... the nurse's comments were outrageous, and if they had no good medical reason to suspect drugs, that nurse should have been dragged in front of a regulatory body, and told to keep her fucking superstitions to herself.

Otherwise, it's all good. Big Grin

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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06-04-2015, 11:04 AM
Re: Polydactyly
I'm sure you're right. I submitted to a urine test (all negative, by the way) and she babbled about Xanax and other meds that leave your system fairly quick. The father's family went up there (even though we were having a major disagreement) to prove that it runs on their side.

All I can say is that I was angry, confused, (and maybe a touch naive) and was happy to get the hell out of that hospital.
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06-04-2015, 11:24 AM
RE: Polydactyly
(06-04-2015 11:04 AM)mecanna Wrote:  I'm sure you're right. I submitted to a urine test (all negative, by the way) and she babbled about Xanax and other meds that leave your system fairly quick. The father's family went up there (even though we were having a major disagreement) to prove that it runs on their side.

All I can say is that I was angry, confused, (and maybe a touch naive) and was happy to get the hell out of that hospital.

This really bothers me, (as I am involved in medical care). If it's been less than two or three years, years, (depending on your state), I would go back and ask to meet with a Patient Representative, (and maybe even talk to a lawyer), and tell them what happened. There is no excuse for this. First of all, nurses don't admit and discharge people. So a physician had to sign off on something. It just doesn't make sense that professionals involved in OBGYN care would not know about genetics being a major factor in this. If there were ulrasounds done, the polydactyly was probably seen (and maybe even mentoned in the reports) during the pregnancy, so it would have been no big suprise. If the MD suspected something, they had ample opportunity, pre-delivery, to say something or ask. I suppose it depends on the time and energy you want to expend on what is done and gone. The least I would do is write a REALLY nasty letter addressed to the head of the hospital AND the heads of the physician and nursing Quality-Risk Management committees. That way you know for sure it will get discussed, even if they never reply to you.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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06-04-2015, 12:15 PM
Re: Polydactyly
I can tell you that it wasn't noticed during the ultrasound. The hospital incident has been longer than 3 years ago.

That hospital sends out a questionnaire to all patients. Filled it out, detailing my experience. I should have done more. That particular nurse is longer employed there.
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06-04-2015, 12:49 PM
RE: Polydactyly
"Normal" is highly overrated.

...

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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06-04-2015, 01:00 PM
RE: Polydactyly
I would think that she would have superior balance because of the extra toes. When I was dancing in toe shoes (on point) one of the girls had webbed feet and it made her able to stand on point without the toes buckling over onto the toe knuckle. This is a problem with ballet dancers but this girl never had feet problems.

I've always been curious about people with extra toes. I would think it would be an advantage for many things. Swimming? Maybe with extra width in the foot it's more like a flipper. The gymnastic balance beam? Wider base of the feet. I donno, I think it's fantastic!

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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06-04-2015, 01:01 PM
RE: Polydactyly
You sound like an awesome parent. I really mean it. It sounds like you've handled all of this extremely well.

I don't have kids, so I'm not sure how I'd react to stuff like this. I'm pretty non-confrontational, but I have this gut feeling like I'm going to be uber-sensitive and protective if/when I have children. That nurse, I think I might have gone full-on viking rage at her.

I'm just thinking out loud.
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06-04-2015, 01:01 PM
RE: Polydactyly
(06-04-2015 12:15 PM)mecanna Wrote:  I can tell you that it wasn't noticed during the ultrasound. The hospital incident has been longer than 3 years ago.

That hospital sends out a questionnaire to all patients. Filled it out, detailing my experience. I should have done more. That particular nurse is longer employed there.

Good. That's cool then. Those surveys are looked at very carfully, as such a small percent actually get filled out and returned. The ones that do have an impact. You can be sure her manager saw it, as well as many others.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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06-04-2015, 04:08 PM (This post was last modified: 06-04-2015 09:29 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Polydactyly
(06-04-2015 10:35 AM)mecanna Wrote:  Babies sometimes like to pull their socks off. My girl definitely did. In public, I was told fantastic tales about her toes... how she's descended from the race of giants that produced Goliath.

I'd run with that one. Because "Why do you have extra toes?" "I'm descended from the race of giants that produced Goliath. Would you like some tea?" Drinking Beverage is just so badass in so many different ways. Big Grin

There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
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