Post kids career change
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04-09-2014, 06:33 AM
RE: Post kids career change
(03-09-2014 08:08 AM)Bows and Arrows Wrote:  I would send your resume off to some recruiters. Sometimes a change of scenery is enough of a change.

My husband was feeling stagnant for a bit, a friend offered him a job at another place, it was fun in the beginning but quickly turned into a nightmare. He switched again and now is still in his field but in a completely different side of it and he loves it.

So, maybe there is something out there that uses the skills you have but in just a completely different way that breathes some life into work again and changes the pace of things.

And a word of caution: don't expect children to be independent too far in the future. Life ( kids) have a way of throwing a curve ball and changing plans ( unexpected grand children, unable to get employment and be self supporting right out of school, bad relationships, etc)


I am fond of change.

Those are all options. Some would require me moving to Houston or something. We just moved from there 2.5 years ago. I hate that place, my kids hate that place, it is horrible for us. There are few options for me to stay in my field here, but I like the small town living much more than my profession.

Of course there are always the possibility of issues arising. They will be dealt with and my life plan will be adjusted as necessary. My kids are and will always be the biggest priority in my life. Even after having a "I know why some animals eat their young" kind of morning today.
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04-09-2014, 09:22 AM
RE: Post kids career change
(03-09-2014 10:00 AM)Chas Wrote:  It sounds like a great plan to me. Thumbsup

A few years ago I investigated getting a teaching certificate so I could teach math/science in middle or high school. I didn't pursue it, but I may yet.

Good Math and Science teachers are always welcome in high school and middle school. So many people in science and math go off into other careers which pay much better But in Canada I don't know if that scenario is the same as the US. You're Canadian aren't you? My husband teaches Shakespeare and would love to change careers but it's hard to segway that into a different career, though he does do a lot of acting and theatre. He's 50 and feeling it too. Manapause is a real thing.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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04-09-2014, 11:28 AM
RE: Post kids career change
I'm not in a great life-experience position to offer valid advice, but if it were me, I'd suck it up for a few more years with the better paying job, then retire early (and possibly work a low stress-low commitment part time gig). Ultimately do what makes you happiest.

I prefer fantasy, but I have to live in reality.
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05-09-2014, 06:59 AM
RE: Post kids career change
(04-09-2014 11:28 AM)Adrianime Wrote:  I'm not in a great life-experience position to offer valid advice, but if it were me, I'd suck it up for a few more years with the better paying job, then retire early (and possibly work a low stress-low commitment part time gig). Ultimately do what makes you happiest.
I have no plans of ever fully retiring as long as my heath holds. The idea of being home every day all day with not much to do is kind of depressing. Once you retire you have to manage your money so it is not like you can travel all the time or whatever else comes to mind that will burn through your retirement money.
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05-09-2014, 08:15 AM
RE: Post kids career change
Retirement doesn't mean being at home all day every day. It can be whatever you want. You can volunteer, clean up parks, build a green house, take up painting (or another hobby). Whatever floats your boat.

I prefer fantasy, but I have to live in reality.
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05-09-2014, 11:51 AM
RE: Post kids career change
(05-09-2014 08:15 AM)Adrianime Wrote:  Retirement doesn't mean being at home all day every day. It can be whatever you want. You can volunteer, clean up parks, build a green house, take up painting (or another hobby). Whatever floats your boat.

It might mean being at home every day if that is what you can afford. My nest egg is nice, but not enough to retire young. That is why the semi-retired approach is appealing to me. I also like the idea of staying productive, I get that from my twice retired dad who is currently unretired.
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05-09-2014, 12:14 PM
Post kids career change
I'm just happy to know I'm not alone in feeling burnt out in my career. Not that it's much of a career. In retrospect I don't even feel as though I chose it. It was a path of necessity. The most school I had the time or money for was a trade school. The rest was just whatever work was at hand and paid the bills. None of this is what I would have chosen for myself. It's all for the family's needs.

But, I've spent so many years stifling my "dreams" I'm not sure I have any now. I guess I shouldn't be embarrassed that I no longer want to be lead singer in a band at my age. So there's that...

He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! -Brian's mum
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05-09-2014, 12:35 PM (This post was last modified: 05-09-2014 12:38 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Post kids career change
(02-09-2014 05:03 PM)wazzel Wrote:  If this is to light for this section please move

I have been in my current career for 20 years, 26 if you count my time in college. It has become a significant drag. More and more I do not feel like going. It is a fairly good field. The pay is good and the work is sometimes interesting. I got 7 years until my youngest is out if high school. My older two should be done or almost done college at that time. I will be 50 at that time. I really do not think I can stand doing what I do now for another 20+ years. Changing now would be detrimental to the family but I can get what ever cradentuals I will need to move on after kids.

A couple of things that come to mind. X-Ray tech. Not sure the hours or pay. Go get a teaching cert in math/science since I have a related degree and go teach middle school. Go get a music ed/math/scienc and see if a school could use a math and science teacher that could also teach beginner band.

It would be a big cut in pay but I have a good neat egg for retirement already. Without the kids in private school and other kid expenses wife and I could live as well as we do now on about 40% of what I make. She has agreed to sell our 3700 sq-ft house after our second starts college. Should be able to turn the sale into a smaller house mostly paid. She also started working so we would not be 100% dependant on me for money.

That is if we do not split for other reasons.

In put, comments, discussion?

I love little kids, and they sorta take to me. I think teaching little ones would be such a blast, and there is a crying need for men in the field. So that's a really good idea.

One other little known (or talked about) (reliable) thing is medical coding and billing. You'd have to get certified, or get a 2 year degree, or maybe get accepted into a masters program, which would be fairly easy if you have almost any degree. That way you can sit for the RHIA exam. You mentioned X-ray tech ... if you're really interested in radiology, the CT / MRI techs, (or ultrasound techs, or cardiac sonographers do well I hear, and are in big demand, and do well, and have really interesting jobs. Anyway the good experienced specialty coders all work from home, pretty much work as much or as little as they want, (they name their hours and shifts), and make $30-$40 per hour, depending where you live. Not too bad. I also recommend that for people who anticipate long academic courses, as it's a fast way to get working doing something, (at home) while you're working on what you really want to do long term, BUT BEWARE of the fake for-profit school (worthless) programs for that. There are MANY. Be sure and pick a reputable (hopefully not-for-profit) good school/university.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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05-09-2014, 01:11 PM
RE: Post kids career change
(05-09-2014 12:14 PM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  I'm just happy to know I'm not alone in feeling burnt out in my career. Not that it's much of a career. In retrospect I don't even feel as though I chose it. It was a path of necessity. The most school I had the time or money for was a trade school. The rest was just whatever work was at hand and paid the bills. None of this is what I would have chosen for myself. It's all for the family's needs.

But, I've spent so many years stifling my "dreams" I'm not sure I have any now. I guess I shouldn't be embarrassed that I no longer want to be lead singer in a band at my age. So there's that...
I hear you. I felt somewhat pushed to my field. There were always expectations I was going to be an engineer since I was good at math and science. I really wanted a career in music. I played 7 instruments before I was out of high school. I ended up in mech engineering, partially due to the pressure and partially from the fear of not being able to make it on a musicians pay.

Can I be part of your dream as the bassist? I did get close. When I lived in Columbia, SC the band I was in cut a demo and we got picked up by one of the local stations for a while. Hearing yourself on the radio for the first time is an experience I will never forget.
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05-09-2014, 01:13 PM
RE: Post kids career change
(05-09-2014 12:35 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  
(02-09-2014 05:03 PM)wazzel Wrote:  If this is to light for this section please move

I have been in my current career for 20 years, 26 if you count my time in college. It has become a significant drag. More and more I do not feel like going. It is a fairly good field. The pay is good and the work is sometimes interesting. I got 7 years until my youngest is out if high school. My older two should be done or almost done college at that time. I will be 50 at that time. I really do not think I can stand doing what I do now for another 20+ years. Changing now would be detrimental to the family but I can get what ever cradentuals I will need to move on after kids.

A couple of things that come to mind. X-Ray tech. Not sure the hours or pay. Go get a teaching cert in math/science since I have a related degree and go teach middle school. Go get a music ed/math/scienc and see if a school could use a math and science teacher that could also teach beginner band.

It would be a big cut in pay but I have a good neat egg for retirement already. Without the kids in private school and other kid expenses wife and I could live as well as we do now on about 40% of what I make. She has agreed to sell our 3700 sq-ft house after our second starts college. Should be able to turn the sale into a smaller house mostly paid. She also started working so we would not be 100% dependant on me for money.

That is if we do not split for other reasons.

In put, comments, discussion?

I love little kids, and they sorta take to me. I think teaching little ones would be such a blast, and there is a crying need for men in the field. So that's a really good idea.

One other little known (or talked about) (reliable) thing is medical coding and billing. You'd have to get certified, or get a 2 year degree, or maybe get accepted into a masters program, which would be fairly easy if you have almost any degree. That way you can sit for the RHIA exam. You mentioned X-ray tech ... if you're really interested in radiology, the CT / MRI techs, (or ultrasound techs, or cardiac sonographers do well I hear, and are in big demand, and do well, and have really interesting jobs. Anyway the good experienced specialty coders all work from home, pretty much work as much or as little as they want, (they name their hours and shifts), and make $30-$40 per hour, depending where you live. Not too bad. I also recommend that for people who anticipate long academic courses, as it's a fast way to get working doing something, (at home) while you're working on what you really want to do long term, BUT BEWARE of the fake for-profit school (worthless) programs for that. There are MANY. Be sure and pick a reputable (hopefully not-for-profit) good school/university.

Not interested in codeing, I want more personal interaction. I told my kids I was thinking about becoming a teacher after they graduated. The three of them agreed I should either teach the little kids or high school in order to save middle/Jr high kids from lots of hurt feelings.
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