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17-09-2015, 07:55 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
Paleoanthropology and primatology (both are closely related, obviously).
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17-09-2015, 08:07 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 07:50 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 07:39 AM)jennybee Wrote:  I read a lot about kinesiology. I haven't done the mushroom foraging thing, but that sounds fun!

Everything can be fun, once . . . . Dodgy

Unless you know what you're doing you can kill yourself really quick. If you would like to get into it, find a nearby expert or foraging group to go out on forays with. Are you in northern or southern California? Northern is the best place to be for mushrooms and is where I started (Mendocino county). There is a lot of different angles on identifying a species. You could be correct and angles 1-9 and be wrong on angle 10 and enjoy liver failure. What I did before ventured into the forest is extensively studied all of the deadly species. I learned to identify those before anything else. I have only encountered one deadly mushroom in the wild, that was Amanita phalloides, better known as the death cap. It can be fun and rewarding, but only after you have done due diligence. Consider

Sure, why not? I'm always up for trying new things. Hopefully, I don't find the death cap Big Grin I'm in Northern CA.
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17-09-2015, 08:11 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 07:10 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 06:51 AM)yakherder Wrote:  I wouldn't say I'm too much into mushrooms as a science, but I am into foraging and, out of the various things available to forage, mushrooms are among the items that require the most understanding in order to do so without getting yourself sick. So I do tend to pay attention to at least some degree Smile

Two fields I do try to stay current in are neuroscience and endocrinology. Neuroscience because I'm a language nerd with a shitty memory, and understanding the latest research on how the brain works helps a lot in regards to being able to manipulate memory function to more efficiently dump shit into it and not forget. Endocrinology because I'm a fitness nerd, and I've found it much more useful than the highly flawed field of nutrition science in understanding diet as it relates to getting your body to react the way you want to how you work it and what you put into it.

That's awesome! You don't have to get balls deep into the science of it in order to forage safely but some of it does help with identification such as using a microscope to view the shape of the spores. Have you ever tried to ID a red Russula? There are 20 different species and impossible to ID without a microscope. What guide book are you using? I started out with the Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms but I have found many mistakes in it since becoming more knowledgeable about mycology. It can be tricky. Mycologists are constantly re-classifying species in to differing genus such as Lepista nuda (wood blewit) becoming Clitocybe nuda. Some guides will attribute species which are continent-specific to local species which creates confusion (you can see that with the attribution of Amanita ceasarea to Amanita Jacksonii here in the U.S.). I started out wanting to forage to eat them, but my interest in eating them has diminished over the years ( unless we are talking about the more favorable species such as Craterellus cornucopiodes, Morchella esculenta, Cantherellus (any), Grifola frondosa, Laetiporus sulpherus, Pleurotus ostreatus, etc,.). What are your favorite go to species for foraging?

First off, I must apologize for not being too familiar with the official names. In Alaska and Washington, my stepfather just showed me which ones were edible and referred to them by what are obviously their less scientific nicknames. Since coming to Québec and spending a lot of time in the sticks in Vermont, I've been using a site called Northern Bushcraft that has a lot of information. I'd say about half the ones here I recognize from Washington, but there's a few new ones.

Which ones I look for kind of depends on my reason for going. If I'm alone, I'll look for the ones I'm most likely to enjoy eating. If I'm taking my son, he doesn't really care about that. He just likes the ones that look weird.

Lion's mane and bear's head tooth just came into season here, and my son loves finding those because it gives him an excuse to stare up at the trees. Hen of the woods is also just starting to show up and I use it in strips to make something resembling a mock meat, which my girlfriend appreciates being a vegetarian. Same with various varieties of jelly ear, which appear off and on throughout the year, often after a couple heavy rains.

My son is also fascinated with the big white roundish looking ones we call puffballs. Though most of the puffballs we come across I can identify as edible, I've taught my son to avoid them for now because there are some very similar looking ones which are quite dangerous. He's catching on quick, but he's not even 4 yet so I'll play it safe for now Smile

Another cool looking one my son is fascinated with are indigo milk caps, probably because he thinks the idea of blue mushrooms is neat. There are other common caps that grow off and on throughout the year. Not as interesting, but a good consolation prize if we don't find what we're looking for.

So yeah there's a lot up here. Late summer and fall (i.e. right now and for the next couple months) is by far the best time for foraging mushrooms around here, but there's almost always something to look for.

'Murican Canadian
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17-09-2015, 08:19 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
Fish

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“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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17-09-2015, 08:25 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
Many years ago, I knew a woman that was an expert at foraging. We'd go out in a group and gather wild plants and mushrooms for salads and such. It wasn't always the tastiest stuff, but it was fascinating to see how much of the world around us is edible. Unfortunately, she stopped doing the group when one guy thought he had learned everything she knew and got himself killed by eating bad mushrooms. Sadcryface

As for myself, one of my latest hobbies sciences is crystal formation. I got one of those kid's science kits as a semi-joke gift, and it was basically just growing alum crystals. This had the unintended effect of me wanting to know how these ordered and beautiful structures come about. I've been doing "experiments" in my kitchen with controlling the crystal growth speed, size, shape, clarity, etc. I'm not sure why I find it so fascinating, but I do. I'd love to be able to work with other minerals, but not sure I want to invest in the equipment.

Excuse me, I'm making perfect sense. You're just not keeping up.

"Let me give you some advice, bastard: never forget what you are. The rest of the world will not. Wear it like armor, and it can never be used to hurt you." - Tyrion Lannister
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17-09-2015, 08:27 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:25 AM)itsnotmeitsyou Wrote:  Many years ago, I knew a woman that was an expert at foraging. We'd go out in a group and gather wild plants and mushrooms for salads and such. It wasn't always the tastiest stuff, but it was fascinating to see how much of the world around us is edible. Unfortunately, she stopped doing the group when one guy thought he had learned everything she knew and got himself killed by eating bad mushrooms. Sadcryface

Um, Octapulse, about that foraging group... Tongue
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17-09-2015, 08:32 AM (This post was last modified: 17-09-2015 08:39 AM by yakherder.)
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
That's why I have my son avoid the puffballs Tongue There are some mushrooms which are easily identifiable as safe. There are others that are also safe but have like 3 other cousins that look almost the same but for a few subtle characteristics and can kill you, or even make you sick if you just handle them.

Edit: Another common thing with mushrooms are types that are okay if eaten on their own but become toxic if consumed with alcohol. Weird shit.

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17-09-2015, 08:45 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:27 AM)jennybee Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 08:25 AM)itsnotmeitsyou Wrote:  Many years ago, I knew a woman that was an expert at foraging. We'd go out in a group and gather wild plants and mushrooms for salads and such. It wasn't always the tastiest stuff, but it was fascinating to see how much of the world around us is edible. Unfortunately, she stopped doing the group when one guy thought he had learned everything she knew and got himself killed by eating bad mushrooms. Sadcryface

Um, Octapulse, about that foraging group... Tongue

I should clarify, he foraged and ate the mushrooms separate from the group, not while we were with her. Foraging is pretty safe if you actually know what you're doing. This guy followed us around for a few weeks and then decided he was an expert in what mushrooms were ok.

I'm sure Octapulse is smarter than that, being a mentat and all. Big Grin

Excuse me, I'm making perfect sense. You're just not keeping up.

"Let me give you some advice, bastard: never forget what you are. The rest of the world will not. Wear it like armor, and it can never be used to hurt you." - Tyrion Lannister
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17-09-2015, 08:46 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:11 AM)yakherder Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 07:10 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  That's awesome! You don't have to get balls deep into the science of it in order to forage safely but some of it does help with identification such as using a microscope to view the shape of the spores. Have you ever tried to ID a red Russula? There are 20 different species and impossible to ID without a microscope. What guide book are you using? I started out with the Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms but I have found many mistakes in it since becoming more knowledgeable about mycology. It can be tricky. Mycologists are constantly re-classifying species in to differing genus such as Lepista nuda (wood blewit) becoming Clitocybe nuda. Some guides will attribute species which are continent-specific to local species which creates confusion (you can see that with the attribution of Amanita ceasarea to Amanita Jacksonii here in the U.S.). I started out wanting to forage to eat them, but my interest in eating them has diminished over the years ( unless we are talking about the more favorable species such as Craterellus cornucopiodes, Morchella esculenta, Cantherellus (any), Grifola frondosa, Laetiporus sulpherus, Pleurotus ostreatus, etc,.). What are your favorite go to species for foraging?

First off, I must apologize for not being too familiar with the official names. In Alaska and Washington, my stepfather just showed me which ones were edible and referred to them by what are obviously their less scientific nicknames. Since coming to Québec and spending a lot of time in the sticks in Vermont, I've been using a site called Northern Bushcraft that has a lot of information. I'd say about half the ones here I recognize from Washington, but there's a few new ones.

Which ones I look for kind of depends on my reason for going. If I'm alone, I'll look for the ones I'm most likely to enjoy eating. If I'm taking my son, he doesn't really care about that. He just likes the ones that look weird.

Lion's mane and bear's head tooth just came into season here, and my son loves finding those because it gives him an excuse to stare up at the trees. Hen of the woods is also just starting to show up and I use it in strips to make something resembling a mock meat, which my girlfriend appreciates being a vegetarian. Same with various varieties of jelly ear, which appear off and on throughout the year, often after a couple heavy rains.

My son is also fascinated with the big white roundish looking ones we call puffballs. Though most of the puffballs we come across I can identify as edible, I've taught my son to avoid them for now because there are some very similar looking ones which are quite dangerous. He's catching on quick, but he's not even 4 yet so I'll play it safe for now Smile

Another cool looking one my son is fascinated with are indigo milk caps, probably because he thinks the idea of blue mushrooms is neat. There are other common caps that grow off and on throughout the year. Not as interesting, but a good consolation prize if we don't find what we're looking for.

So yeah there's a lot up here. Late summer and fall (i.e. right now and for the next couple months) is by far the best time for foraging mushrooms around here, but there's almost always something to look for.

No problem, a lot of foragers use the common names rather than the scientific. I love puffballs, especially Lycoperdum perlatum (gem studded puffball). I would love to find an indigo milky! No luck yet. Still looking for chickens and hens with no luck either. Lion's mane is supposed to be really yummy! Definitely on my list to try. I often see people finding them inside hollowed logs or trees so don't just look up, but in as well!

(22-08-2015 07:30 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  It is by will alone I set my brows in motion it is by the conditioner of avocado that the brows acquire volume the skin acquires spots the spots become a warning. It is by will alone I set my brows in motion.
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17-09-2015, 08:51 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:32 AM)yakherder Wrote:  even make you sick if you just handle them.

That is an outright myth I want to take the opportunity to bust right here. Not only can you handle a deadly mushroom without getting sick, you can even (gasp) taste one without any worries as long as you spit it out after tasting it. This freaks out the majority of people when you point it out, but it actually takes a large amount of toxic mushrooms to kill you (like multiple caps). Taste is one of the most helpful field indicators in identifying a species.

(22-08-2015 07:30 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  It is by will alone I set my brows in motion it is by the conditioner of avocado that the brows acquire volume the skin acquires spots the spots become a warning. It is by will alone I set my brows in motion.
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