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17-09-2015, 08:53 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:45 AM)itsnotmeitsyou Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 08:27 AM)jennybee Wrote:  Um, Octapulse, about that foraging group... Tongue

I should clarify, he foraged and ate the mushrooms separate from the group, not while we were with her. Foraging is pretty safe if you actually know what you're doing. This guy followed us around for a few weeks and then decided he was an expert in what mushrooms were ok.

I'm sure Octapulse is smarter than that, being a mentat and all. Big Grin

There are old foragers and there are bold foragers. But there are none that are both

(22-08-2015 07:30 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  It is by will alone I set my brows in motion it is by the conditioner of avocado that the brows acquire volume the skin acquires spots the spots become a warning. It is by will alone I set my brows in motion.
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17-09-2015, 08:59 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:51 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 08:32 AM)yakherder Wrote:  even make you sick if you just handle them.

That is an outright myth I want to take the opportunity to bust right here. Not only can you handle a deadly mushroom without getting sick, you can even (gasp) taste one without any worries as long as you spit it out after tasting it. This freaks out the majority of people when you point it out, but it actually takes a large amount of toxic mushrooms to kill you (like multiple caps). Taste is one of the most helpful field indicators in identifying a species.

Hard to test a lot of the things you hear in a hobby that has the potential to be unforgiving to the trial and error technique Smile

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17-09-2015, 09:03 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:59 AM)yakherder Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 08:51 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  That is an outright myth I want to take the opportunity to bust right here. Not only can you handle a deadly mushroom without getting sick, you can even (gasp) taste one without any worries as long as you spit it out after tasting it. This freaks out the majority of people when you point it out, but it actually takes a large amount of toxic mushrooms to kill you (like multiple caps). Taste is one of the most helpful field indicators in identifying a species.

Hard to test a lot of the things you hear in a hobby that has the potential to be unforgiving to the trial and error technique Smile

I know, it tends to be an impermeable stigma barrier

(22-08-2015 07:30 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  It is by will alone I set my brows in motion it is by the conditioner of avocado that the brows acquire volume the skin acquires spots the spots become a warning. It is by will alone I set my brows in motion.
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17-09-2015, 09:04 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
Fluid dynamics Drooling

"Allow there to be a spectrum in all that you see" - Neil Degrasse Tyson
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17-09-2015, 09:06 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 08:46 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 08:11 AM)yakherder Wrote:  First off, I must apologize for not being too familiar with the official names. In Alaska and Washington, my stepfather just showed me which ones were edible and referred to them by what are obviously their less scientific nicknames. Since coming to Qu├ębec and spending a lot of time in the sticks in Vermont, I've been using a site called Northern Bushcraft that has a lot of information. I'd say about half the ones here I recognize from Washington, but there's a few new ones.

Which ones I look for kind of depends on my reason for going. If I'm alone, I'll look for the ones I'm most likely to enjoy eating. If I'm taking my son, he doesn't really care about that. He just likes the ones that look weird.

Lion's mane and bear's head tooth just came into season here, and my son loves finding those because it gives him an excuse to stare up at the trees. Hen of the woods is also just starting to show up and I use it in strips to make something resembling a mock meat, which my girlfriend appreciates being a vegetarian. Same with various varieties of jelly ear, which appear off and on throughout the year, often after a couple heavy rains.

My son is also fascinated with the big white roundish looking ones we call puffballs. Though most of the puffballs we come across I can identify as edible, I've taught my son to avoid them for now because there are some very similar looking ones which are quite dangerous. He's catching on quick, but he's not even 4 yet so I'll play it safe for now Smile

Another cool looking one my son is fascinated with are indigo milk caps, probably because he thinks the idea of blue mushrooms is neat. There are other common caps that grow off and on throughout the year. Not as interesting, but a good consolation prize if we don't find what we're looking for.

So yeah there's a lot up here. Late summer and fall (i.e. right now and for the next couple months) is by far the best time for foraging mushrooms around here, but there's almost always something to look for.

No problem, a lot of foragers use the common names rather than the scientific. I love puffballs, especially Lycoperdum perlatum (gem studded puffball). I would love to find an indigo milky! No luck yet. Still looking for chickens and hens with no luck either. Lion's mane is supposed to be really yummy! Definitely on my list to try. I often see people finding them inside hollowed logs or trees so don't just look up, but in as well!

Wow, just googled an indigo mushroom --those look really cool! I've never knew they even existed. What do they taste like? How would you eat something like that? Like a portobello burger?

[Image: Lactarius-indigo-2.jpg]

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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17-09-2015, 09:10 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 09:04 AM)ClydeLee Wrote:  Fluid dynamics Drooling

I got interested in this when I worked in the aeronautics industry. A few of our turbine engineers were very helpful in explaining things, but damn do fluids act strangely under extreme circumstances. Thumbsup

Excuse me, I'm making perfect sense. You're just not keeping up.

"Let me give you some advice, bastard: never forget what you are. The rest of the world will not. Wear it like armor, and it can never be used to hurt you." - Tyrion Lannister
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17-09-2015, 09:12 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
I would like to learn more about astronomy, now that I am out country and can see the stars much better than I could in the city.

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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17-09-2015, 09:12 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 09:06 AM)jennybee Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 08:46 AM)Octapulse Wrote:  No problem, a lot of foragers use the common names rather than the scientific. I love puffballs, especially Lycoperdum perlatum (gem studded puffball). I would love to find an indigo milky! No luck yet. Still looking for chickens and hens with no luck either. Lion's mane is supposed to be really yummy! Definitely on my list to try. I often see people finding them inside hollowed logs or trees so don't just look up, but in as well!

Wow, just googled an indigo mushroom --those look really cool! I've never knew they even existed. What do they taste like? How would you eat something like that? Like a portobello burger?

[Image: Lactarius-indigo-2.jpg]

Not a very strong taste really. A little bitter like most mushrooms. There aren't exactly a lot of indigo cap specific recipes floating around out there, but generally speaking a cap is a cap in regards to how you eat it. The gills on these ones are a little weird to handle, but it's all the same in your stomach Smile I rarely find them in large enough quantities to satisfy a recipe, though.

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17-09-2015, 09:15 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 09:12 AM)yakherder Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 09:06 AM)jennybee Wrote:  Wow, just googled an indigo mushroom --those look really cool! I've never knew they even existed. What do they taste like? How would you eat something like that? Like a portobello burger?

[Image: Lactarius-indigo-2.jpg]

Not a very strong taste really. A little bitter like most mushrooms. There aren't exactly a lot of indigo cap specific recipes floating around out there, but generally speaking a cap is a cap in regards to how you eat it. The gills on these ones are a little weird to handle, but it's all the same in your stomach Smile

When I make a portobello burger, I scrape out the gills with a spoon, so it's not so earthy tasting. Is that considered uncouth in the foraging community? Tongue

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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17-09-2015, 09:20 AM
RE: Post your quirky scientific interests here
(17-09-2015 09:15 AM)jennybee Wrote:  
(17-09-2015 09:12 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Not a very strong taste really. A little bitter like most mushrooms. There aren't exactly a lot of indigo cap specific recipes floating around out there, but generally speaking a cap is a cap in regards to how you eat it. The gills on these ones are a little weird to handle, but it's all the same in your stomach Smile

When I make a portobello burger, I scrape out the gills with a spoon, so it's not so earthy tasting. Is that considered uncouth in the foraging community? Tongue

Nah that's fine. it's just that with indigo caps, the initial appearance is just the beginning of their weirdness. This colored latex like fluid leaks out when you cut them or scrape the gills, which is probably unnerving if you're not expecting it, and yet another reason why my son likes these ones lol. It's perfectly safe, though.

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