Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
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07-02-2013, 07:00 AM
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
(06-02-2013 03:34 AM)bemore Wrote:  I think people have been traveling the world for a long time. There are enough ancient maps to back it up from all over the world.

Wheres the conspiracy though?
No conspiracy, just skepticism while I would love to rush to the decision that the Romans visited america (and I mean I would REALLY love that) I must remain skeptical of the situation. I will broaden my research on this later on. Hopefully i can find some counter arguments if there are any to be found of these claims. Some may not be important enough to try and argue over. I do suspect that a lot of the one supporting a 'jewish' discovery of america to be hoaxes, largely in part of the Mormons and their fundamentalism/extremism that I doubt they'd have much of a problem setting up hoaxes.

However if it's true that large amounts of amphoraes were discovered off the coast of Brazil and their government halted all underwater exploration after that it would support the notion of the Roman discovery of America. In my experience, people who make it illegal to investigate things are usually trying to cover something up.
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07-02-2013, 07:14 AM
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
The Jews, who were being hounded out of the promised land for being too fat, paid a Nazi to row them over to North America regularly, for weight loss clinic visits When they got here, they started plotting to blow up anything they could find. The fat Jews discovered Merica, and then sold it back to the Indians, and told then not to tell anyone, and then made up the Columbus story to cover their deeds. Then Ferdinand and Isabella went to Germany, and set up the ovens, and camps, and put camophlage over them, and they were not discovered until the 1940's, and it's really the Spanish royalty who planned it all, and they blamed it on the Germans, who threw, (actually launched) the Kensington Rune Stone form a secret Nazi base, and it flew ALL the way to Minnesotam and landed in the farmer's field. It's true. Every word of it.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

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07-02-2013, 10:39 AM
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
I saw a television program on History2 which had some convincing evidence that there were Englishmen ( at least one, but almost certainly more) who had visited America, and ventured as far as the American south-west a couple of hundred years before the Vikings. I wish I remembered the programs name and the details, but I don't.

Anyway, what appears to be a tombstone of an Englishmen has been found at an archeological site complete with twelfth or thirteenth century runes and a English name (not Christian name). It is entirely possible that it is a hoax, but if it is it is a damn good one. The family name which is on the stone just happens to die out around the same time in England as when this guy was buried. The runes are also changed around this time. The only thing that doesn't completely jive is the stone wasn't weathered, but it was obvious that 'treasure-hunters' had been digging out the cave. If it were buried this would explain the lack of weathering.

I'm not 100% convinced, but it is enough evidence to make me question.

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08-02-2013, 12:31 AM
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
Well, if you adhere to the "Out of Africa" theory of the spread of homo sapiens, then the whole world, including America, was discovered by primitive Africans some 50000 or so years ago.
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08-02-2013, 01:00 AM (This post was last modified: 08-02-2013 01:04 AM by Nappa.)
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
(07-02-2013 10:39 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  I saw a television program on History2 which had some convincing evidence that there were Englishmen ( at least one, but almost certainly more) who had visited America, and ventured as far as the American south-west a couple of hundred years before the Vikings. I wish I remembered the programs name and the details, but I don't.

Anyway, what appears to be a tombstone of an Englishmen has been found at an archeological site complete with twelfth or thirteenth century runes and a English name (not Christian name). It is entirely possible that it is a hoax, but if it is it is a damn good one. The family name which is on the stone just happens to die out around the same time in England as when this guy was buried. The runes are also changed around this time. The only thing that doesn't completely jive is the stone wasn't weathered, but it was obvious that 'treasure-hunters' had been digging out the cave. If it were buried this would explain the lack of weathering.

I'm not 100% convinced, but it is enough evidence to make me question.
I think the englishman in question might be Madoc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madoc

I remember reading about him in one of the sites I visited. Although archeologists should be seriously questioning if other people had contact with the American continents they seem to be uninterested, or even a little reluctant to the idea.

Though they were unable to refute the norse discovery of Vinland, and so they simply had to accept this they, love portraying as a 'failed' discovery. Go figure.

Personally it's not that hard to imagine a roman trading vessel getting lost at sea, or even roman exploration of the vast and seemingly endless sea to the west of their empire.
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08-02-2013, 01:35 AM
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
(08-02-2013 01:00 AM)Nappa Wrote:  
(07-02-2013 10:39 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  I saw a television program on History2 which had some convincing evidence that there were Englishmen ( at least one, but almost certainly more) who had visited America, and ventured as far as the American south-west a couple of hundred years before the Vikings. I wish I remembered the programs name and the details, but I don't.

Anyway, what appears to be a tombstone of an Englishmen has been found at an archeological site complete with twelfth or thirteenth century runes and a English name (not Christian name). It is entirely possible that it is a hoax, but if it is it is a damn good one. The family name which is on the stone just happens to die out around the same time in England as when this guy was buried. The runes are also changed around this time. The only thing that doesn't completely jive is the stone wasn't weathered, but it was obvious that 'treasure-hunters' had been digging out the cave. If it were buried this would explain the lack of weathering.

I'm not 100% convinced, but it is enough evidence to make me question.
I think the englishman in question might be Madoc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madoc

I remember reading about him in one of the sites I visited. Although archeologists should be seriously questioning if other people had contact with the American continents they seem to be uninterested, or even a little reluctant to the idea.

Though they were unable to refute the norse discovery of Vinland, and so they simply had to accept this they, love portraying as a 'failed' discovery. Go figure.

Personally it's not that hard to imagine a roman trading vessel getting lost at sea, or even roman exploration of the vast and seemingly endless sea to the west of their empire.
No, the chap in questions first name was "rough" though written in runes, however his Christian name is unknown (it has been speculated that it may be Peter). Unfortunately I cannot recollect his last name though it may have started with an "H" using the Roman alphabet.

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08-02-2013, 02:57 AM
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
Nappa, no one likes Columbus. Except third graders and the uneducated. He was a nasty, brutish man who discovered the Americas by accident. I seriously doubt any academicians are defending him seriously. What you're probably seeing is caution when claims are made with scanty evidence. The Viking discovery of North America is well documented with several lines of evidence including historical and archeological. So it is widely accepted as truth in the scientific and historical communities. It's even been in a documentary on Discovery, the bastion of all truth and knowledge ( Hobo ).

Claims of Romans and Englishmen do not have good supporting evidence. Until significant evidence is presented, the default position is skepticism.

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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08-02-2013, 05:31 PM
RE: Pre-viking European 'discovery' of America?
(08-02-2013 01:00 AM)Nappa Wrote:  
(07-02-2013 10:39 AM)Dark Light Wrote:  I saw a television program on History2 which had some convincing evidence that there were Englishmen ( at least one, but almost certainly more) who had visited America, and ventured as far as the American south-west a couple of hundred years before the Vikings. I wish I remembered the programs name and the details, but I don't.

Anyway, what appears to be a tombstone of an Englishmen has been found at an archeological site complete with twelfth or thirteenth century runes and a English name (not Christian name). It is entirely possible that it is a hoax, but if it is it is a damn good one. The family name which is on the stone just happens to die out around the same time in England as when this guy was buried. The runes are also changed around this time. The only thing that doesn't completely jive is the stone wasn't weathered, but it was obvious that 'treasure-hunters' had been digging out the cave. If it were buried this would explain the lack of weathering.

I'm not 100% convinced, but it is enough evidence to make me question.
I think the englishman in question might be Madoc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madoc

I remember reading about him in one of the sites I visited. Although archeologists should be seriously questioning if other people had contact with the American continents they seem to be uninterested, or even a little reluctant to the idea.

Though they were unable to refute the norse discovery of Vinland, and so they simply had to accept this they, love portraying as a 'failed' discovery. Go figure.

Personally it's not that hard to imagine a roman trading vessel getting lost at sea, or even roman exploration of the vast and seemingly endless sea to the west of their empire.
Who on God's green earth is They? Are you talking about archaeologists? There is some semblance of mainstream accepted archaeology but even in the field there is always different ideas and with degrees of consensus.

You talk as if their is a Columbus loving coalition that were so disappointed to have to give in to Viking discovery, what is your reason for this attitude or is it just your personal view expressed in your words.

"Allow there to be a spectrum in all that you see" - Neil Degrasse Tyson
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