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26-11-2012, 12:04 PM (This post was last modified: 26-11-2012 06:25 PM by ghostexorcist.)
Primate news
I already have a thread in which I post incoming discoveries about Mars. I figured that I would do the same with apes as it ultimately reflects upon our physiology, behavior and psychology. I will also post any less current stuff that I happen upon.

* http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...132908.htm (Chimpanzees and Bonobos May Reveal Clues to Evolution of Favor Exchange in Humans)

* http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...151311.htm (Evidence of a 'Mid-Life Crisis' in Great Apes)

* http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...113458.htm (New Brain Gene Gives Us Edge Over Apes, Study Suggests)

* http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/scien...a/1703107/ (Chimps' gut bugs look similar to human ones)

* http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...201124.htm (Humans, Chimpanzees and Monkeys Share DNA but Not Gene Regulatory Mechanisms)

* http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...090954.htm (Primate of the Opera: What Soprano Singing Apes On Helium Reveal About the Human Voice)

This last one I am currently reading. It is very interesting because it has implications towards the evolution of our own problem solving skills. The full text may not be available for too much longer, though. I have the brief PDF if anyone is interested in reading it.

* http://www.springerlink.com/content/8211...lltext.pdf (Deactivation of snares by wild chimpanzees)
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26-11-2012, 03:12 PM
RE: Primate news
(26-11-2012 12:04 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  This last one I am currently reading. It is very interesting because it has implications towards the evolution of our own problem solving skills. The full text may not be available for too much longer, though. I have the brief PDF if anyone is interested in reading it.

* http://www.springerlink.com/content/8211...lltext.pdf (Deactivation of snares by wild chimpanzees)

The chimps of Bossou, Guinea don't have a 100% deactivation rate, but they all (at least the males) know how the snares are constructed and what areas to grab and what areas to avoid. The authors suggest this community's lone ability to deactivate the snares is a product of cultural knowledge that has been past down through the generations. They apparently have lived in closer proximity to human settlements than any other chimp community. Other bodies of chimps have a much higher occurrence of snare injuries, suggesting they have yet to figure out how the device works.
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07-12-2012, 03:11 PM
RE: Primate news
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...6.htm65988 (Monkey Business: What Howler Monkeys Can Tell Us About the Role of Interbreeding in Human Evolution)
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08-12-2012, 01:31 AM
Primate news
Why do monkeys fling poo?

"All that is necessary for the triumph of Calvinism is that good Atheists do nothing." ~Eric Oh My
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09-12-2012, 07:39 PM
RE: Primate news
(08-12-2012 01:31 AM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why do monkeys fling poo?

I can only assume it's because poo is a readily available weapon.
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09-12-2012, 07:49 PM
Primate news
(09-12-2012 07:39 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(08-12-2012 01:31 AM)Erxomai Wrote:  Why do monkeys fling poo?

I can only assume it's because poo is a readily available weapon.

That makes sense, I suppose. Consider

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11-12-2012, 10:44 PM
RE: Primate news
This is a German illustration of a chimpanzee from 1765. It's not news, but I figure people might be interested in what early depictions of our cousin looked like. Some Christians may reject the idea that we are related to chimps, but it's obvious their human-like behavior was noticed as far back as the 18th-century. He looks like a hairy old man out for a stroll with his walking stick.

[Image: 1765illustrationofachim.jpg]
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13-12-2012, 12:00 PM
RE: Primate news
Western chimpanzees--those that make spears, sleep in caves, and lounge in water (things eastern and central chimps don't do)--might be a separate species.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/gues...es-of-pan/
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16-12-2012, 06:48 PM
RE: Primate news
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...084933.htm (Rhesus Monkeys Cannot Hear the Beat in Music)

Here is an interesting conclusion from the article:

Quote:These research results are in line with the vocal learning hypothesis, which suggests that only species who can mimic sounds share the ability of beat induction. These species include several bird and mammal species, although the ability to mimic sounds is only weakly developed, or missing entirely, in nonhuman primates.
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31-12-2012, 03:50 PM (This post was last modified: 31-12-2012 07:10 PM by ghostexorcist.)
RE: Primate news
It is commonly quoted that humans and chimps shear nearly 99% of our respective DNA. This is based on the shear number of similar genes. However, this number does not take into account gene duplication and the specific proteins produced by these similar genes. If these are accounted for, the number is more like 94%. This new figure is based on a new method of measurement that was reported in a 2006 paper. I would actually like to see this method used on all other figures. For instance, the results of the Bonobo genome project shows we share 98.7% of our DNA. I'm sure this number would be more like 93 point something percent since the project showed bonobos and chimps share 99.6% of their DNA.

You can learn about the new figures in the following articles:

* http://www.scientificamerican.com/articl...e-gap-wide
* http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Ado...ne.0000085

Some creationist/I.D. bloggers have caught into this new figure and have been focusing on the new figure of 6% genetic difference. They intentionally do this to misdirect their readers from the fact that we still share more genes with chimps than any other animal on the planet. I've even seen some people try to lull themselves into a false sense of security by claiming a true 99% or even 100% match in DNA would not mean that we are related to chimps. According to their delusional way of thinking, this just means god used the same genes to make humans and chimps from scratch. That's just like saying I'm not related to my parents because god created all of us from scratch. However, I'm sure these same Christians would resort to a paternity test if some lady was trying to say they were the father of her child.
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