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01-02-2013, 10:08 AM
RE: Primate news
* http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...--+Apes%29 (Bonobos Predisposed to Show Sensitivity to Others)

WOW! How hard is it to get that our propensity toward empathy is hardwired.... even a chimp knows it!?! Shy

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
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01-02-2013, 01:05 PM
RE: Primate news
(01-02-2013 10:08 AM)kim Wrote:  * http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...--+Apes%29 (Bonobos Predisposed to Show Sensitivity to Others)

WOW! How hard is it to get that our propensity toward empathy is hardwired.... even a chimp knows it!?! Shy

One of the co-authors, a world famous primatologist, is coming out with a book next month called The Bonobo and the Atheist: In Search of Humanism Among the Primates. The main point is to show that morals are in-born, so I'm sure he will touch upon the natural empathy of our primate cousins. The only draw back I see is that, although he is an atheist, the author Frans de Waal is not a big fan of the Neo-Atheist movement.
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11-02-2013, 08:30 PM
RE: Primate news
I'm currently reading a book on Chimpanzee culture for my class on biological anthropology. This sentence explains the odd effects of habituating primates with foodstuffs (the emphasis is mine):

Quote:At Wamba, the superabundance of sugar-cane may have led to high frequencies of food-sex orgies of bonobos.

The scenario paints a pretty picture doesn't it? I'm glad I am reading this in my house because I'm pretty sure I would have been thrown out of the library for laughing so loud.
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11-02-2013, 10:30 PM
RE: Primate news
(11-02-2013 08:30 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  I'm currently reading a book on Chimpanzee culture for my class on biological anthropology. This sentence explains the odd effects of habituating primates with foodstuffs (the emphasis is mine):

Quote:At Wamba, the superabundance of sugar-cane may have led to high frequencies of food-sex orgies of bonobos.

The scenario paints a pretty picture doesn't it? I'm glad I am reading this in my house because I'm pretty sure I would have been thrown out of the library for laughing so loud.


That certainly is a pretty picture, Mr. Ghost Exorcist.

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
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11-02-2013, 10:57 PM
RE: Primate news
(11-02-2013 10:30 PM)Free Thought Wrote:  That certainly is a pretty picture, Mr. Ghost Exorcist.

This news cast rams the point home (no pun intended) with censored bars and porn music:



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11-02-2013, 11:11 PM
RE: Primate news
(11-02-2013 10:57 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  
(11-02-2013 10:30 PM)Free Thought Wrote:  That certainly is a pretty picture, Mr. Ghost Exorcist.

This news cast rams the point home (no pun intended) with censored bars and porn music:




You certainly know how to find.. interesting.. stories.
To say the least.

Such odd apes.

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
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25-07-2013, 04:18 PM (This post was last modified: 25-07-2013 04:21 PM by ghostexorcist.)
RE: Primate news
It has been nearly 6 months since I last posted anything here. A lot of stuff has happened since then. I, however, don't feel like posting all of what's happened. I'll just post a link to ape-related stuff on Science Daily. Feel free to browse through that. One new thing to report is that a new study has found that Oreopithecus, a fossil ape that lived in what would become Italy 7-9 million MYA, was not habitually bipedal. The study focused on the lumbar and sacrum regions of the spine. There are apparently too many differences between it and humans to support the notion they walked upright all of the time.

I am not too familiar with the species, well beyond the name, when it lived, and the unmistakable picture of the fossil (see below); but I have to admit I can understand why science once thought it was bipedal. A 2002 book I have on the primate fossil record says it has a "short lumbar region with robust vertebrae" and "short, broad illia..." That describes our morphology. I guess the devil is in the details.

[Image: 130725125447-large.jpg?1374775572]
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25-07-2013, 04:21 PM
RE: Primate news
I always enjoyed Karl Pilkington's explanation of the phrase 'Monkey Business'




"IN THRUST WE TRUST"

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06-08-2013, 11:06 AM
RE: Primate news
(25-07-2013 04:18 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  It has been nearly 6 months since I last posted anything here. A lot of stuff has happened since then. I, however, don't feel like posting all of what's happened. I'll just post a link to ape-related stuff on Science Daily. Feel free to browse through that. One new thing to report is that a new study has found that Oreopithecus, a fossil ape that lived in what would become Italy 7-9 million MYA, was not habitually bipedal. The study focused on the lumbar and sacrum regions of the spine. There are apparently too many differences between it and humans to support the notion they walked upright all of the time.

I am not too familiar with the species, well beyond the name, when it lived, and the unmistakable picture of the fossil (see below); but I have to admit I can understand why science once thought it was bipedal. A 2002 book I have on the primate fossil record says it has a "short lumbar region with robust vertebrae" and "short, broad illia..." That describes our morphology. I guess the devil is in the details.

[Image: 130725125447-large.jpg?1374775572]

More stuff about Oreopithecus...

http://news.discovery.com/animals/strang...130805.htm

It turns out the human-like qualities of the lumbar and pelvis regions were actually just artifacts from the fossil being crushed over time. It also had a weird backward-facing toe (like a bird). It is related to us, just not directly. It's more of a distant cousin.
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16-08-2013, 01:48 PM
RE: Primate news
This the first documented case of swimming and diving in apes. This is amazing because their dense structure usually makes them sink like a rock and drown. The behavior was learned as the two individuals studied were raised around humans.

The Science Daily write up:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...--+Apes%29

The full article:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.10...22338/full

What's funny is that Footers are using this as proof that Bigfoot can swim.



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