Professional passion, improvement, and my confession.
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10-06-2016, 07:44 PM
RE: Professional passion, improvement, and my confession.
(10-06-2016 01:00 PM)Adrianime Wrote:  Well, I have a secret. I don't even tell most friends because I think there is a chance it could impact my professional future. But I often come here to TTA to expose myself for the "terrible person" that I really am. So why stop now?

My secret isn't anything big, I suspect many feel the same, even if they don't say it. But here it goes.

I find professional improvement beyond the scope of "necessary" to be a waste of time. I like to get stuff done. Give me a task and I'll do it. Tell me to build something, and I'll build it. Give me a problem, I'll solve it. I actually enjoy doing so. Even if I've seen the problem 100 times before, I still like solving it. Yet there are those who do continuing education for no perceivable benefit (like getting your masters in CS after you have already been a developer for years). Or seem enthusiastic about reading up on the latest tech, or attending some convention, or listening to a "talk". If it's required by your work, fine, whatever. But when people just willfully do this stuff, or spend time learning skills that might very well never be used. Frankly I don't get it. It seems like a waste of time.

But in the professional world, it seems like having this sentiment is viewed very poorly. "How could you not have a passion to continue improving yourself?" "Isn't it all the new blah blah blah exciting...?"

It's like no, it's not really exciting. Just give me stuff to do, and I'll do it. I'm interested in the work only as far as I find it interesting to build solutions to solve problems. Beyond learning the tools that are available to me to do my work, I'm really not that interested "improving myself" (professionally).

To clarify, I mean that beyond the scope of my job. If I choose to switch to a different technology, of course I would want to learn the new tech and get up to speed with it. But until then, it's just unnecessary to me.

It kind of reminds me of that interview question, "where do you see yourself 5 years from now?" I'm just thinking, "You know what, I just want to get hired and do work for you and see if I enjoy it." But of course an answer like that isn't really acceptable.

---
A small personal note. I've been constantly pushed by my managers in my jobs. Always complimenting me and telling me they want to keep putting me on bigger and bigger things. As such, nearly everytime I master a "type" of work, I get whooshed up the ladder involuntarily and put on a bigger scale. Then I look back at my co-workers who are doing what I used to do and I'm just thinking, "you lucky bastards, that was my job." A while back, my manager approached me saying he thought I could take over this team someday. I flat out said (in a very polite, playful, and friendly manner) no, I'm not interested in a management position.

I should be grateful, and I guess I am, as it has boosted my resume greatly and resulted in very nice raises and promotions. But there seems to be a disconnect between capability and desire for me. Sure, I might be capable of doing a whole bunch of stuff. But that's not what I necessarily want. I find completing a whole bunch of simple (relatively speaking) tasks more rewarding than completing a few very complex tasks. But I feel it would be professional idiocy to ever admit that at work. It seems like I have an unacceptable stance. If you don't want to improve, there must be something wrong with you.

Shoot, I just like getting my work done.

Can anybody relate? I know, I know. I'm messed up.

I'd hire you in a heart beat.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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11-06-2016, 06:21 AM
RE: Professional passion, improvement, and my confession.
Just never confuse your job with your life.

...

Those are the sorry bastards that wind up with ulcers, heart attacks, and finish with lots of regrets.

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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11-06-2016, 07:06 AM
RE: Professional passion, improvement, and my confession.
(10-06-2016 01:00 PM)Adrianime Wrote:  Well, I have a secret. I don't even tell most friends because I think there is a chance it could impact my professional future. But I often come here to TTA to expose myself for the "terrible person" that I really am. So why stop now?

My secret isn't anything big, I suspect many feel the same, even if they don't say it. But here it goes.

I find professional improvement beyond the scope of "necessary" to be a waste of time. I like to get stuff done. Give me a task and I'll do it. Tell me to build something, and I'll build it. Give me a problem, I'll solve it. I actually enjoy doing so. Even if I've seen the problem 100 times before, I still like solving it. Yet there are those who do continuing education for no perceivable benefit (like getting your masters in CS after you have already been a developer for years). Or seem enthusiastic about reading up on the latest tech, or attending some convention, or listening to a "talk". If it's required by your work, fine, whatever. But when people just willfully do this stuff, or spend time learning skills that might very well never be used. Frankly I don't get it. It seems like a waste of time.

But in the professional world, it seems like having this sentiment is viewed very poorly. "How could you not have a passion to continue improving yourself?" "Isn't it all the new blah blah blah exciting...?"

It's like no, it's not really exciting. Just give me stuff to do, and I'll do it. I'm interested in the work only as far as I find it interesting to build solutions to solve problems. Beyond learning the tools that are available to me to do my work, I'm really not that interested "improving myself" (professionally).

To clarify, I mean that beyond the scope of my job. If I choose to switch to a different technology, of course I would want to learn the new tech and get up to speed with it. But until then, it's just unnecessary to me.

It kind of reminds me of that interview question, "where do you see yourself 5 years from now?" I'm just thinking, "You know what, I just want to get hired and do work for you and see if I enjoy it." But of course an answer like that isn't really acceptable.

---
A small personal note. I've been constantly pushed by my managers in my jobs. Always complimenting me and telling me they want to keep putting me on bigger and bigger things. As such, nearly everytime I master a "type" of work, I get whooshed up the ladder involuntarily and put on a bigger scale. Then I look back at my co-workers who are doing what I used to do and I'm just thinking, "you lucky bastards, that was my job." A while back, my manager approached me saying he thought I could take over this team someday. I flat out said (in a very polite, playful, and friendly manner) no, I'm not interested in a management position.

I should be grateful, and I guess I am, as it has boosted my resume greatly and resulted in very nice raises and promotions. But there seems to be a disconnect between capability and desire for me. Sure, I might be capable of doing a whole bunch of stuff. But that's not what I necessarily want. I find completing a whole bunch of simple (relatively speaking) tasks more rewarding than completing a few very complex tasks. But I feel it would be professional idiocy to ever admit that at work. It seems like I have an unacceptable stance. If you don't want to improve, there must be something wrong with you.

Shoot, I just like getting my work done.

Can anybody relate? I know, I know. I'm messed up.

That seems to be a lot of superfluous gloating. Yea you should always try to do your best on any job you have. And?

I really get a lip twitch reading things like this because while there is nothing wrong with giving yourself credit for what you do, I find far too often when many who talk like this end up looking down at others below them, and that does not benefit society at all. There will always be those who desire to move up, and that is fine. But any chain in a multi class system is as only as strong as it's weakest link and we don't do enough currently to insure the economic stability of the middle class and working poor. I don't care where you end up, that is on you, and as much credit as you should give yourself, no, you did not do it all by yourself.

It is literally physically impossible to do everything by yourself. Don't put yourself down for not being perfect, and don't chase other's ideas of what you think you should do. Most are lucky if they end up with good pay and people they can work with. It certainly is a plus if you end up doing what you enjoy. But I really still hate how far too much of society sells chasing titles and status as being more important than the economic stability of more.

Poetry by Brian37(poems by an atheist) Also on Facebook as BrianJames Rational Poet and Twitter Brianrrs37
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