Programmer Checkin
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14-04-2017, 01:53 PM
RE: Programmer Checkin
I don't know if it counts as programming, but when I'm making books and articles for clients, I use a markuplanguage kalled TeX. I work in a editor (WinEdt), store the code to disk and compiles from the editor. I can then make postscript and pdf's from the compiled file. For publishing on different platforms.

The one, true, and real Harvey

Bene vixit, bene qui latuit
René Descartes
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14-04-2017, 02:04 PM (This post was last modified: 14-04-2017 02:13 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Programmer Checkin
(14-04-2017 01:53 PM)Harvey Wrote:  I don't know if it counts as programming, but when I'm making books and articles for clients, I use a markuplanguage kalled TeX. I work in a editor (WinEdt), store the code to disk and compiles from the editor. I can then make postscript and pdf's from the compiled file. For publishing on different platforms.

LaTeX is used a lot by old school (and a lot of new school for that matter) researchers. I don't use it myself but I know it has data structures (lists , maybe others), variables, functions/macros and conditionals. (Don't think it has iteration or other program flow control but I could certainly be wrong about that, it has functions and conditionals so it might support recursion.) Sounds like programming to me. Hell anyone putting formula cells into Excel is programming. At this point I would consider just about everyone who has a cellphone a programmer whether they even realize it or not. I remember when programmers were special, now everybody's one. Makes me proud. Means the programmers done good, did their job right. Thumbsup

#sigh
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14-04-2017, 04:15 PM
RE: Programmer Checkin
(14-04-2017 02:04 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(14-04-2017 01:53 PM)Harvey Wrote:  I don't know if it counts as programming, but when I'm making books and articles for clients, I use a markuplanguage kalled TeX. I work in a editor (WinEdt), store the code to disk and compiles from the editor. I can then make postscript and pdf's from the compiled file. For publishing on different platforms.

LaTeX is used a lot by old school (and a lot of new school for that matter) researchers. I don't use it myself but I know it has data structures (lists , maybe others), variables, functions/macros and conditionals. (Don't think it has iteration or other program flow control but I could certainly be wrong about that, it has functions and conditionals so it might support recursion.) Sounds like programming to me. Hell anyone putting formula cells into Excel is programming. At this point I would consider just about everyone who has a cellphone a programmer whether they even realize it or not. I remember when programmers were special, now everybody's one. Makes me proud. Means the programmers done good, did their job right. Thumbsup

I actually use it for homework. I had a bit of a relearning curve, but once I got over that, I actually like how it makes me slow down and think through my proofs, and then my homework looks really nice and legible. I use a site called overleaf.com, and it's awesome, because I can work on it from anywhere, and I've even gotten to class, realized I forgot to print out my homework, and just emailed it to my prof from my phone right there before class starts. The future is magic. (I just started grad school last fall after being out of college for nearly 15 years.)
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15-04-2017, 07:54 AM
RE: Programmer Checkin
I use LaTeX. I quite like it. Makes putting documents together a breeze. Everyone I work with insists on Word though Weeping

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If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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15-04-2017, 09:15 AM
RE: Programmer Checkin
I used LaTeX in the mid- to late eighties, but found it easier to modify TeX-code, and make my own definitions and macros using plain TeX. I could more easily write the code I needed to implement the layouts I had made for various projects for the different publishing houses. I'm now running a very old version of Y&Y TeX, but will set up a new machine running MiKTeX during the summer.

When I have set up a machine to work flaslessly, I don't easily change or update anything.

I don't have many clients left, beeing a nursing student, but I still do all the typography for the math journal Mathematica Scandinavica, owned and published by the five nordic mathematical societies. And then there is the odd book, now and then. Mostly new editions of titles published earlier.

The one, true, and real Harvey

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René Descartes
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16-04-2017, 02:23 PM
RE: Programmer Checkin
Another programmer here Smile Web programmer actually. I use VB.NET for my work. I actually would have preferred using C# as I prefer the syntax (and I remember some cases when I needed to translate code from C# to VB and it wasn't possible in VB), but using VB was an easier and more natural choice as we moved from ASP/vbscript to .NET 10 years ago.

SQL Server for the database. I agree, Microsoft has some very good IDEs for programmers, which is why I don't hold any grudge against them for having ever created Internet Explorer.

I used php/mysql in my previous job, and I still use it for side projects.
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17-04-2017, 02:17 PM
RE: Programmer Checkin
In the past I've dabbled in Python, C#, and PHP.

I've created a few small applications in Java before my employer took away my ability to code in it (not an approved language, is it?). I've used VB to create some handy-dandy macros that I use pretty much daily. I've used a bit of PowerShell, too, and will probably have to keep leaning on that since I can't develop in a major OOP language (not in my job description, so I get no IDE and no dev environment to make tools that make my job easier- arggghh).

Right now I do a lot of Oracle PL/SQL, batch files, etc. for my ETL work.
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08-07-2017, 03:00 PM
RE: Programmer Checkin
I have found app development nirvana. In it's latest attempt to take over the world by branding the look-and-feel of every app, Google has developed a set of design guidelines for developing rich user experiences called material design. Of course xaml, being by far the most legible and comprehensible style markup language, has an open-source implementation - MaterialDesign.Themes you can grab from Visual Studio's NuGet package manager. Now I can make hip shiny apps like the cool kids!

Oh and Visual Studio 2017's out and it's got "edit and continue" for xaml. No more dicking around with the designer and going through multiple debug sessions to see your UI changes. Debug once, change the xaml, see the changes. It's fucking badass productive.

#sigh
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08-07-2017, 04:25 PM
RE: Programmer Checkin
(08-07-2017 03:00 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  I have found app development nirvana. In it's latest attempt to take over the world by branding the look-and-feel of every app, Google has developed a set of design guidelines for developing rich user experiences called material design. Of course xaml, being by far the most legible and comprehensible style markup language, has an open-source implementation - MaterialDesign.Themes you can grab from Visual Studio's NuGet package manager. Now I can make hip shiny apps like the cool kids!

Oh and Visual Studio 2017's out and it's got "edit and continue" for xaml. No more dicking around with the designer and going through multiple debug sessions to see your UI changes. Debug once, change the xaml, see the changes. It's fucking badass productive.

When I have the data, I plan on installing 2017. Since I re installed my windows machine I've been stuck with only using my linux box which I'm mostly using Vim to program in at the moment (since I'm doing C and C# that's good enough for now)

DLJ Wrote:And, yes, the principle of freedom of expression works both ways... if someone starts shit, better shit is the best counter-argument.
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