Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
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04-03-2011, 11:37 PM
Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
Texas has long been a hotbed of controversy on immigration issues. And a proposed immigration bill in the Texas state House is sure to raise more than a few eyebrows. The bill would make hiring an "unauthorized alien" a crime punishable by up to two years in prison and a $10,000 fine, unless that is, they are hired to do household chores.

Yes, under the House Bill 2012 introduced by a tea party favorite state Rep. Debbie Riddle -- who's been saying for some time that she'd like to see Texas institute an Arizona-style immigration law -- hiring an undocumented maid, caretaker, lawnworker or any type of houseworker would be allowed. Why? As Texas state Rep. Aaron Pena, also a Republican, told CNN, without the exemption, "a large segment of the Texas population" would wind up in prison if the bill became law.

"When it comes to household employees or yard workers it is extremely common for Texans to hire people who are likely undocumented workers," Pena told the news giant. "It is so common it is overlooked."

Jon English, Rep. Riddle's chief of staff explained that the exemption was an attempt to avoid "stifling the economic engine" in Texas, which today is, somewhat ironically, celebrating its declaring independence from Mexico in 1836.

"Excepting household workers from a anti-immigration laws renders the law impotent and self-contradictory, just like the current U.S. immigration policy, of which it is almost a perfect microcosm," legal ethics writer Jack Marshall wrote on his blog. "It guarantees a measure without integrity that sends a mixed enforcement message and does nothing to stop the long-standing deplorable 'we don't want you but somebody has to do those menial jobs' attitude that has paralyzed our immigration policy for decades."

Rep. Riddle made headlines last year when she claimed unnamed FBI officials had told her that pregnant women from the Middle East were traveling to America as tourists to give birth, and then raising their children to be terrorists who could later enter the U.S. freely as citizens -- so-called "terror babies," a devious offshoot of "anchor babies." She became somewhat infamous on the web when she stumbled repeatedly in a CNN interview about the claims, complaining later that host Anderson Cooper's line of questioning was more intense than she had prepared for.

"They did not tell me you were going to grill me on specific information that I was not ready to give to you tonight," Riddle said when Cooper pressed her for more details. "They did not tell me that, sir."

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05-03-2011, 12:26 PM
RE: Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
That is one of the funniest things I've seen in a very long time. Thanks for posting that.

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05-03-2011, 12:44 PM
 
RE: Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
Gotta love politics. Illegal immigration, with exception for those to rich to care for their own house, because after all if they deported the maids who's going to seek out and destroy the cobwebs and dust bunnies? Undecided
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05-03-2011, 01:16 PM
RE: Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
(05-03-2011 12:26 PM)BnW Wrote:  That is one of the funniest things I've seen in a very long time. Thanks for posting that.

Yeah, but they are actually serious about that.

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05-03-2011, 01:46 PM
RE: Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
(05-03-2011 01:16 PM)Kar98 Wrote:  Yeah, but they are actually serious about that.

That's what makes it so funny.

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05-03-2011, 04:03 PM
 
Everything's bigger in Texas! Even Political BS
It's actually a typo on the OP. It's not H.B 2012. Rather, it's H.B. 1202.

One wonders how many maids Ms.Riddle has in her domestic employ?
What isn't going to be funny is if the Bill actually does pass. Turning illegals into indentured servants is the Texas way! Rolleyes

Meanwhile, there's no unemployed people nor single citizen mom's that would love to have the jobs currently born on the backs of illegals. That's why there's welfare, so they can all get by with a modicum of contempt afforded from those who chance to stand behind such folks, when they're buying groceries with a food stamp card, as baby sits in the cart seat playing with the toy mommy bought 2nd hand from Goodwill, while praying to an invisible friend in the process that things will get better for both her and her little treasure.
Yeah, that's funny as hell. What's a laugh riot is it was the vote that gave power to the mind that thought the punch line made for a great House Bill that effectively says American society, at least in Texas, has grown accustomed to depending on illegals for certain menial tasks.
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05-03-2011, 04:15 PM
RE: Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
The underpaid can stay because the filthy rich are too f&%$ing cheap to pay the maids a fair wage. Sounds like politics to me. Oh, I thought politics was spelled B-U-L-L-S-H-I-T.

When I find myself in times of trouble, Richard Dawkins comes to me, speaking words of reason, now I see, now I see.
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06-03-2011, 11:49 AM
RE: Proposed Texas immigration law contains convenient loophole for ‘the help’
(04-03-2011 11:37 PM)trillium13 Wrote:  Texas has long been a hotbed of controversy on immigration issues. And a proposed immigration bill in the Texas state House is sure to raise more than a few eyebrows. The bill would make hiring an "unauthorized alien" a crime punishable by up to two years in prison and a $10,000 fine, unless that is, they are hired to do household chores.

Yes, under the House Bill 2012 introduced by a tea party favorite state Rep. Debbie Riddle -- who's been saying for some time that she'd like to see Texas institute an Arizona-style immigration law -- hiring an undocumented maid, caretaker, lawnworker or any type of houseworker would be allowed. Why? As Texas state Rep. Aaron Pena, also a Republican, told CNN, without the exemption, "a large segment of the Texas population" would wind up in prison if the bill became law.

"When it comes to household employees or yard workers it is extremely common for Texans to hire people who are likely undocumented workers," Pena told the news giant. "It is so common it is overlooked."

Jon English, Rep. Riddle's chief of staff explained that the exemption was an attempt to avoid "stifling the economic engine" in Texas, which today is, somewhat ironically, celebrating its declaring independence from Mexico in 1836.

"Excepting household workers from a anti-immigration laws renders the law impotent and self-contradictory, just like the current U.S. immigration policy, of which it is almost a perfect microcosm," legal ethics writer Jack Marshall wrote on his blog. "It guarantees a measure without integrity that sends a mixed enforcement message and does nothing to stop the long-standing deplorable 'we don't want you but somebody has to do those menial jobs' attitude that has paralyzed our immigration policy for decades."

Rep. Riddle made headlines last year when she claimed unnamed FBI officials had told her that pregnant women from the Middle East were traveling to America as tourists to give birth, and then raising their children to be terrorists who could later enter the U.S. freely as citizens -- so-called "terror babies," a devious offshoot of "anchor babies." She became somewhat infamous on the web when she stumbled repeatedly in a CNN interview about the claims, complaining later that host Anderson Cooper's line of questioning was more intense than she had prepared for.

"They did not tell me you were going to grill me on specific information that I was not ready to give to you tonight," Riddle said when Cooper pressed her for more details. "They did not tell me that, sir."

This makes perfect sense to me. Why would a state like Texas outlaw the next best thing to slavery?
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