Psychology of Religious Faith
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14-09-2011, 08:47 PM
Psychology of Religious Faith
Religion, in my view and many others, is a mental-health disorder which causes individuals to feel an inflation of self-worth, power,(telepathy) and a greater understanding of ‘everything.’ I find this to be dangerous because the adverse effects way out the positive effects: Simplistic thinking, inability to doubt or question religious doctrines, judgmental attitudes, and the overall view of cosmic holy wars (crusades).

To me and many others, religion is one thing: Grandiose Delusional Personality Disorder.

When I imagine a world without religion, I see a world of greater appreciation because we would live for the present moment and not in the future. A-lot of religious people believe that this life doesn’t matter because the real life starts after the only life that we know of ends. Religion has only destroyed humanity . . . that’s upsetting because life is incredibly beautiful. We have so much to live for and when we do die, we rest in peace.

I have one question that I could like to raise: In a world of different dangerous religious faith, how could we escape wars?

Just to inform everyone, I am a newbie on this forum board, but I already love the open-minded conversations. It feels enlightening to be a part of a group who doesn’t tell me that I am going to burn in hell for all of eternity.


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15-09-2011, 09:06 PM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
While I agree with the premise that Religion is dangerous, so is every ideology that is interpreted in an extreme fashion. It is to my belief that some people simply need religion and faith, because they have nothing more. For instance, the homeless and those with these massive sentences who essentially have nothing left to live for, religion is the anecdote towards their light-less tunnel.

Religion is a bronze age belief system that suited it's primitive science. These days, we actually have answers but a lot of people will remain forever complacent with simply saying "God did it", without having to do any diligent research into the matter. (See: The God Of The Gaps).

I don't believe that religion is a mental-health disorder, as that would be an insult to people with mental-health disorders across the world. As I stated previously, for a time when science did not exist, they needed answers and religion was a convenient source.

As with politics, sexuality and personal attributes, people (children especially) should be left to find out what they believe in for themselves. As Doug Stanhope said, if religion were invented today (and you hadn't heard of it before) would you buy it?

No, when it comes to the psychology of religions faith all you need to know is that some people want to think for themselves yet others are inherently credulous and believe what authority wants them to believe.
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16-09-2011, 09:22 PM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
(15-09-2011 09:06 PM)Crucify This! Wrote:  While I agree with the premise that Religion is dangerous, so is every ideology that is interpreted in an extreme fashion. It is to my belief that some people simply need religion and faith, because they have nothing more. For instance, the homeless and those with these massive sentences who essentially have nothing left to live for, religion is the anecdote towards their light-less tunnel.

Religion is a bronze age belief system that suited it's primitive science. These days, we actually have answers but a lot of people will remain forever complacent with simply saying "God did it", without having to do any diligent research into the matter. (See: The God Of The Gaps).

I don't believe that religion is a mental-health disorder, as that would be an insult to people with mental-health disorders across the world. As I stated previously, for a time when science did not exist, they needed answers and religion was a convenient source.

As with politics, sexuality and personal attributes, people (children especially) should be left to find out what they believe in for themselves. As Doug Stanhope said, if religion were invented today (and you hadn't heard of it before) would you buy it?

No, when it comes to the psychology of religions faith all you need to know is that some people want to think for themselves yet others are inherently credulous and believe what authority wants them to believe.

I really enjoyed reading your reply and I wholeheartedly take your advice. Saying that it is a mental health disorder may be a little harsh; nevertheless, it is a delusional reality.

Yes, it is a bronze age mythTongue

Take care
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16-09-2011, 09:46 PM (This post was last modified: 16-09-2011 09:49 PM by Mark Fulton.)
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
(16-09-2011 09:22 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(15-09-2011 09:06 PM)Crucify This! Wrote:  While I agree with the premise that Religion is dangerous, so is every ideology that is interpreted in an extreme fashion. It is to my belief that some people simply need religion and faith, because they have nothing more. For instance, the homeless and those with these massive sentences who essentially have nothing left to live for, religion is the anecdote towards their light-less tunnel.

Religion is a bronze age belief system that suited it's primitive science. These days, we actually have answers but a lot of people will remain forever complacent with simply saying "God did it", without having to do any diligent research into the matter. (See: The God Of The Gaps).

I don't believe that religion is a mental-health disorder, as that would be an insult to people with mental-health disorders across the world. As I stated previously, for a time when science did not exist, they needed answers and religion was a convenient source.

As with politics, sexuality and personal attributes, people (children especially) should be left to find out what they believe in for themselves. As Doug Stanhope said, if religion were invented today (and you hadn't heard of it before) would you buy it?

No, when it comes to the psychology of religions faith all you need to know is that some people want to think for themselves yet others are inherently credulous and believe what authority wants them to believe.

I really enjoyed reading your reply and I wholeheartedly take your advice. Saying that it is a mental health disorder may be a little harsh; nevertheless, it is a delusional reality.

Yes, it is a bronze age mythTongue

Take care

Hi freeatheism, welcome! Congratulations on your post. I agree with you 100%. I learnt about " religious trauma syndrome" a term coined by a Californian psychologist, Marlene Winnell. Have a look at her website.

You might learn a little more from two of my blogs too.
http://www.markfulton.org/christianity-a...al-society
http://www.markfulton.org/the-psychologi...ristianity

Re "In a world of different dangerous religious faith, how could we escape wars?"
I would say the answer lies in employing genuine empathetic communication
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16-09-2011, 10:09 PM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
(16-09-2011 09:46 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 09:22 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(15-09-2011 09:06 PM)Crucify This! Wrote:  While I agree with the premise that Religion is dangerous, so is every ideology that is interpreted in an extreme fashion. It is to my belief that some people simply need religion and faith, because they have nothing more. For instance, the homeless and those with these massive sentences who essentially have nothing left to live for, religion is the anecdote towards their light-less tunnel.

Religion is a bronze age belief system that suited it's primitive science. These days, we actually have answers but a lot of people will remain forever complacent with simply saying "God did it", without having to do any diligent research into the matter. (See: The God Of The Gaps).

I don't believe that religion is a mental-health disorder, as that would be an insult to people with mental-health disorders across the world. As I stated previously, for a time when science did not exist, they needed answers and religion was a convenient source.

As with politics, sexuality and personal attributes, people (children especially) should be left to find out what they believe in for themselves. As Doug Stanhope said, if religion were invented today (and you hadn't heard of it before) would you buy it?

No, when it comes to the psychology of religions faith all you need to know is that some people want to think for themselves yet others are inherently credulous and believe what authority wants them to believe.

I really enjoyed reading your reply and I wholeheartedly take your advice. Saying that it is a mental health disorder may be a little harsh; nevertheless, it is a delusional reality.

Yes, it is a bronze age mythTongue

Take care

Hi freeatheism, welcome! Congratulations on your post. I agree with you 100%. I learnt about " religious trauma syndrome" a term coined by a Californian psychologist, Marlene Winnell. Have a look at her website.

You might learn a little more from two of my blogs too.
http://www.markfulton.org/christianity-a...al-society
http://www.markfulton.org/the-psychologi...ristianity

Re "In a world of different dangerous religious faith, how could we escape wars?"
I would say the answer lies in employing genuine empathetic communication

Thank you so much! I absolutely love Free thinking forum boards because I can express myself in ways that I cannot do on a day to day basis. I am a psychology major in my second year of college and I have already upset most of my classmates for my beliefs--- Not a surprise.

I also attended 10 out-reach programs, but no matter how good of a person I am; I am disliked for my atheistic views.

I appreciate the feedback and I will definitely check out your blogs.

By the way, you should check out this book:
[Image: varieties-of-anomalous-experience-id-155...;amp;ty=69]
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16-09-2011, 10:30 PM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
(16-09-2011 10:09 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 09:46 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 09:22 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(15-09-2011 09:06 PM)Crucify This! Wrote:  While I agree with the premise that Religion is dangerous, so is every ideology that is interpreted in an extreme fashion. It is to my belief that some people simply need religion and faith, because they have nothing more. For instance, the homeless and those with these massive sentences who essentially have nothing left to live for, religion is the anecdote towards their light-less tunnel.

Religion is a bronze age belief system that suited it's primitive science. These days, we actually have answers but a lot of people will remain forever complacent with simply saying "God did it", without having to do any diligent research into the matter. (See: The God Of The Gaps).

I don't believe that religion is a mental-health disorder, as that would be an insult to people with mental-health disorders across the world. As I stated previously, for a time when science did not exist, they needed answers and religion was a convenient source.

As with politics, sexuality and personal attributes, people (children especially) should be left to find out what they believe in for themselves. As Doug Stanhope said, if religion were invented today (and you hadn't heard of it before) would you buy it?

No, when it comes to the psychology of religions faith all you need to know is that some people want to think for themselves yet others are inherently credulous and believe what authority wants them to believe.

I really enjoyed reading your reply and I wholeheartedly take your advice. Saying that it is a mental health disorder may be a little harsh; nevertheless, it is a delusional reality.

Yes, it is a bronze age mythTongue

Take care

Hi freeatheism, welcome! Congratulations on your post. I agree with you 100%. I learnt about " religious trauma syndrome" a term coined by a Californian psychologist, Marlene Winnell. Have a look at her website.

You might learn a little more from two of my blogs too.
http://www.markfulton.org/christianity-a...al-society
http://www.markfulton.org/the-psychologi...ristianity

Re "In a world of different dangerous religious faith, how could we escape wars?"
I would say the answer lies in employing genuine empathetic communication

Thank you so much! I absolutely love Free thinking forum boards because I can express myself in ways that I cannot do on a day to day basis. I am a psychology major in my second year of college and I have already upset most of my classmates for my beliefs--- Not a surprise.

I also attended 10 out-reach programs, but no matter how good of a person I am; I am disliked for my atheistic views.

I appreciate the feedback and I will definitely check out your blogs.

By the way, you should check out this book:
[Image: varieties-of-anomalous-experience-id-155...;amp;ty=69]

Hi....isn't it a shame that you are disliked because you are an atheist! I'm sure you don't dislike Christians because they are Christians! This is an example of the intolerance of others that is promoted in the bible. I think this needs to be pointed out to Christians.

Thanks for the link to the book. At $250 for a new copy, $88 plus second hand, not available as an ebook, I'll probably give it a miss. I'm not sure why some authors put such high prices on their stuff.

People's delusions and hallucinations I usually don't find particularly interesting, but am I missing something important that this book tells?
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16-09-2011, 11:20 PM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
(16-09-2011 10:30 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 10:09 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 09:46 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 09:22 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(15-09-2011 09:06 PM)Crucify This! Wrote:  While I agree with the premise that Religion is dangerous, so is every ideology that is interpreted in an extreme fashion. It is to my belief that some people simply need religion and faith, because they have nothing more. For instance, the homeless and those with these massive sentences who essentially have nothing left to live for, religion is the anecdote towards their light-less tunnel.

Religion is a bronze age belief system that suited it's primitive science. These days, we actually have answers but a lot of people will remain forever complacent with simply saying "God did it", without having to do any diligent research into the matter. (See: The God Of The Gaps).

I don't believe that religion is a mental-health disorder, as that would be an insult to people with mental-health disorders across the world. As I stated previously, for a time when science did not exist, they needed answers and religion was a convenient source.

As with politics, sexuality and personal attributes, people (children especially) should be left to find out what they believe in for themselves. As Doug Stanhope said, if religion were invented today (and you hadn't heard of it before) would you buy it?

No, when it comes to the psychology of religions faith all you need to know is that some people want to think for themselves yet others are inherently credulous and believe what authority wants them to believe.

I really enjoyed reading your reply and I wholeheartedly take your advice. Saying that it is a mental health disorder may be a little harsh; nevertheless, it is a delusional reality.

Yes, it is a bronze age mythTongue

Take care

Hi freeatheism, welcome! Congratulations on your post. I agree with you 100%. I learnt about " religious trauma syndrome" a term coined by a Californian psychologist, Marlene Winnell. Have a look at her website.

You might learn a little more from two of my blogs too.
http://www.markfulton.org/christianity-a...al-society
http://www.markfulton.org/the-psychologi...ristianity

Re "In a world of different dangerous religious faith, how could we escape wars?"
I would say the answer lies in employing genuine empathetic communication

Thank you so much! I absolutely love Free thinking forum boards because I can express myself in ways that I cannot do on a day to day basis. I am a psychology major in my second year of college and I have already upset most of my classmates for my beliefs--- Not a surprise.

I also attended 10 out-reach programs, but no matter how good of a person I am; I am disliked for my atheistic views.

I appreciate the feedback and I will definitely check out your blogs.

By the way, you should check out this book:
[Image: varieties-of-anomalous-experience-id-155...;amp;ty=69]

Hi....isn't it a shame that you are disliked because you are an atheist! I'm sure you don't dislike Christians because they are Christians! This is an example of the intolerance of others that is promoted in the bible. I think this needs to be pointed out to Christians.

Thanks for the link to the book. At $250 for a new copy, $88 plus second hand, not available as an ebook, I'll probably give it a miss. I'm not sure why some authors put such high prices on their stuff.

People's delusions and hallucinations I usually don't find particularly interesting, but am I missing something important that this book tells?

Well, you seem to have a well-rounded understanding of psychology, but I would like to inform you that The Varieties of Anomalous Experiences is a relatively new book; published in 2008 by the American Psychology Association.

It describes the range of human experience very well, but it is expensive.

I am about to read the blogs now and I will throw you some positive feedback!
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16-09-2011, 11:30 PM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
(16-09-2011 11:20 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 10:30 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 10:09 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 09:46 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  
(16-09-2011 09:22 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  I really enjoyed reading your reply and I wholeheartedly take your advice. Saying that it is a mental health disorder may be a little harsh; nevertheless, it is a delusional reality.

Yes, it is a bronze age mythTongue

Take care

Hi freeatheism, welcome! Congratulations on your post. I agree with you 100%. I learnt about " religious trauma syndrome" a term coined by a Californian psychologist, Marlene Winnell. Have a look at her website.

You might learn a little more from two of my blogs too.
http://www.markfulton.org/christianity-a...al-society
http://www.markfulton.org/the-psychologi...ristianity

Re "In a world of different dangerous religious faith, how could we escape wars?"
I would say the answer lies in employing genuine empathetic communication

Thank you so much! I absolutely love Free thinking forum boards because I can express myself in ways that I cannot do on a day to day basis. I am a psychology major in my second year of college and I have already upset most of my classmates for my beliefs--- Not a surprise.

I also attended 10 out-reach programs, but no matter how good of a person I am; I am disliked for my atheistic views.

I appreciate the feedback and I will definitely check out your blogs.

By the way, you should check out this book:
[Image: varieties-of-anomalous-experience-id-155...;amp;ty=69]

Hi....isn't it a shame that you are disliked because you are an atheist! I'm sure you don't dislike Christians because they are Christians! This is an example of the intolerance of others that is promoted in the bible. I think this needs to be pointed out to Christians.

Thanks for the link to the book. At $250 for a new copy, $88 plus second hand, not available as an ebook, I'll probably give it a miss. I'm not sure why some authors put such high prices on their stuff.

People's delusions and hallucinations I usually don't find particularly interesting, but am I missing something important that this book tells?

Well, you seem to have a well-rounded understanding of psychology, but I would like to inform you that The Varieties of Anomalous Experiences is a relatively new book; published in 2008 by the American Psychology Association.

It describes the range of human experience very well, but it is expensive.

I am about to read the blogs now and I will throw you some positive feedback!

Ok...thanks! Feel free to give me negative feedback too! LOL I want to make these blogs as good as I can. I value your opinion, particularly as you are studying psychology at university. If you can be a bit more specific as to why I might learn from this book I might buy a second hand copy.
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16-09-2011, 11:50 PM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
Code:
Belief in and worship of a creator also strongly correlates with higher early adolescent pregnancy. Teenage birth rates are two to dozens of times higher in the US. than the other countries, despite their higher rate of abortion. In my opinion the reason for the high rate of adolescent pregnancy and abortion is probably because Christians typically refuse to educate adolescents about contraception.

No democracy in this study was shown to have strong religiosity and comparatively high rates of societal health in the parameters measured. The opposite is true. Only the more secular, pro-evolution democracies came closest to achieving a standard of living that features the lowest rates of lethal crime, juvenile-adult mortality, sex-related health issues and abortion. The three least theistic democracies-Japan, France, and Scandinavia-also have the three best figures in these regards. None of the strongly secularized, pro-evolution democracies experienced high levels of measurable dysfunction.


Mark. . . I agree with you 100%. If we look at all the countries that have less than 2% atheists, we soon find out that they have been fighting the most war among themselves. Most of out Nobel Prize winners, and scientists are all atheists. America's national IQ would drop dramatically.

Keep up the good work man!
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17-09-2011, 01:53 AM
RE: Psychology of Religious Faith
(16-09-2011 11:50 PM)FreeAtheism Wrote:  
Code:
Belief in and worship of a creator also strongly correlates with higher early adolescent pregnancy. Teenage birth rates are two to dozens of times higher in the US. than the other countries, despite their higher rate of abortion. In my opinion the reason for the high rate of adolescent pregnancy and abortion is probably because Christians typically refuse to educate adolescents about contraception.

No democracy in this study was shown to have strong religiosity and comparatively high rates of societal health in the parameters measured. The opposite is true. Only the more secular, pro-evolution democracies came closest to achieving a standard of living that features the lowest rates of lethal crime, juvenile-adult mortality, sex-related health issues and abortion. The three least theistic democracies-Japan, France, and Scandinavia-also have the three best figures in these regards. None of the strongly secularized, pro-evolution democracies experienced high levels of measurable dysfunction.


Mark. . . I agree with you 100%. If we look at all the countries that have less than 2% atheists, we soon find out that they have been fighting the most war among themselves. Most of out Nobel Prize winners, and scientists are all atheists. America's national IQ would drop dramatically.

Keep up the good work man!

Thankyou! I assume you are in USA? I am Australian. Did my comments about social problems in USA come across as being bigoted? If so I'll have to look at my wording. Thanks for your time.
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